The Countdown to 2017’s Sexiest Man Alive Reveal Is On! Today’s Hot Guy: Kumail Nanjiani

It’s the most wonderful time of the year: the 2017 Sexiest Man Alive will be revealed on Tuesday, Nov. 14! Ahead of the big day, we’re counting down with a handful of hot Hollywood stars who earned spots in the pages of the issue.

Sexiest Husband Kumail Nanjiani, 39, saw his star rise this year with the debut of his film The Big Sick, based on the true story of his relationship with now-wife Emily V. Gordon. But it’s not just her devotion to her — he proposed shortly after she awoke from a medically induced coma just months into their courtship — that makes him sexy, it’s his humor, too.

A tech guy on Silicon Valley, “I did have a tech job for real,” he tells PEOPLE. “For five years in Chicago. I was very bad at it.

“For me, the sexiest part about being a tech guy was leaving the job and not being a tech guy anymore. Even porns don’t have tech guy scenarios: it’s always pizza guys and plumbers. Those are sexy professions. A tech guy would just show up, say, ‘Did you try restarting it?’ and leave before anything really exciting happened. Nobody wants to see that.”

Check out yesterday’s sexy man of the day, 50 Cent. And come back to PEOPLE on Tuesday, Nov. 14, to find out who’s been crowned 2017’s Sexiest Man Alive!


PEOPLE.com

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The Countdown to 2017’s Sexiest Man Alive Reveal Is On! Today’s Hot Guy: 50 Cent

It’s the most wonderful time of the year: the 2017 Sexiest Man Alive will be revealed on Tuesday, Nov. 14! Ahead of the big day, we’re counting down with a handful of hot Hollywood stars who earned spots in the pages of the issue.

PEOPLE’s Sexiest Triple Threat, rapper/actor/producer 50 Cent, defines sexy as having confidence.

“I think a lot of a man’s confidence is connected to his accomplishments,” the 42-year-old Power star tells PEOPLE. “I don’t think men are as sexy as women are until we’re successful and it’s publicly noted. But if you can have the confidence to just be yourself … you’ll say things that make women laugh, know they like having you around because your energy is just good. It’s you being you versus you trying to be something.”

What also gives him confidence is being a father to his son, 5-year-old Sire.

“He’s the most important person in my life,” the rapper, né Curtis Jackson, explains. “He’s my motivation.”

Check out yesterday’s sexy man of the day, Kofi Siriboe. And come back to PEOPLE on Tuesday, Nov. 14, to find out who’s been crowned 2017’s Sexiest Man Alive!


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BBC Sound of 2017 countdown kicks off with Nadia Rose in fifth place

The BBC’s Sound of 2017 countdown launches, with witty rapper Nadia Rose taking fifth place.
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GT Countdown Top Ten Dogs

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We’re so proud of these pooches we couldn’t go on any longer without counting them down. Who are mankind’s greatest gaming friends?
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GT Countdown Top Ten Metal Gear Games

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As the legacy of Hideo Kojima’s Metal Gear comes to a close, we look back fondly at the best of an elite franchise in gaming.
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GT Countdown Top Ten Metal Gear Games

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As the legacy of Hideo Kojima’s Metal Gear comes to a close, we look back fondly at the best of an elite franchise in gaming.
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GT Countdown Top Ten Straight Up Villains

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Some villains are misunderstood; these are not. We may love to hate them, but we still hate them a lot.
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GT Countdown Top Ten Final Fantasy Jobs

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There are lots of ways to make a living while saving the world in Final Fantasy, but what trade is tops? Weighing both utility and nostalgia we look back at our favorite jobs in the long-running RPG franchise.
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Countdown to Zero

Just before the predictable pyrotechnics of a July 4 weekend, something exploded, maybe or maybe not unpredictably. It was a rocket from SpaceX, the current version of a space-dream factory, meant to resupply the International Space Station. The Falcon 9 clears the tower. Vehicle propulsion is still nominal. It is on course and on track. Then it bursts in air.

And so it became the third such resupply mission to fail in recent months. Is it more than a failure, but also a metaphor of our times? Ambitions that, even in their smallness, can’t be realized?

As with so many others of a certain generation, I was caught up in the great space adventure, the high calling. Lots of black-and-white TV images: Mercury, a demonstration project around the notion that we could launch Americans into space; Gemini, with its space-based maneuvers meant to pave the way to moonshots; and Apollo, which realized the ultimate challenge and provided the ultimate images. It was a July night in 1969, and the moon looked different. It had been brought down to Earth. The spectacle on the small screen (and it really was a small screen) featured the first pair of moon walkers, their footsteps marking the zenith of spaceflight’s heroic age.

Onward (though not outward) from Apollo to the space shuttle. In its earliest phase, the shuttle seemed a natural extension — the heroic age making way for the familiar feats of a Space Transportation System. Spaceflight would be ordinary and inexpensive.

Whatever the shuttle program accomplished, it hardly provided the cheap-and-easy avenue to space. It did provide an avenue for me to experience a space-related thrill. It was April 1981, and I was at Kennedy Space Center for the inaugural launch. I was working as a writer and editor for Lafayette College. I had discovered (after searching pretty relentlessly) an alumnus who was a member of the ground crew; this could be quite a day-in-the-life account, quite the college pride booster. So I was duly accredited as a member of the press. There were the inevitable stalled countdown clocks, the inevitable grumblings from the assembled press corps, and finally the controlled explosion.

For some reason, more than the sight of the whole contraption leaving the pad — surprisingly tentatively at first — I remember the roar of that blastoff. It was the sound of unworldly power. The sound of the future.

Somewhere in the outer limits of my home storage, I found an old issue of Lafayette’s alumni magazine with my description of the central character of launch day: “The shuttle — a strange and wonderful creature, with its stubby nose, delta-shaped wings, bulky fuel tank, and candle-like pair of booster rockets — looked like an extravagant fantasy, a particularly inviting and imaginative attraction from nearby Disneyland.” The shuttle seemed to be a step to something else, to the next challenging chapter of exploration, maybe a Martian venture. Instead, after the last launch, in July 2011, the surviving shuttles were allocated as museum pieces, destined to be displayed like gigantic, immobilized insects. And that was it. If the idea of humans pushing farther and farther into space was no longer a fantasy, it would feel like a closed chapter.

I have a memory from the heroic space age: shaking the hand of Neil Armstrong, a gawky and ghostly presence in that flickering TV image from 1969. Fourteen years later, in 1983, he was at Lafayette to deliver the commencement address. As it happened, my writing portfolio at the college extended to such down-to-earth events. I’ve since gone back to look at my published summary of the ceremony. This was Armstrong the company man, always his preferred persona, not Armstrong the adventurer.

The highest purpose of education, Armstrong told the graduates, is to enable you to give. Today I wonder: What about the gift of something to dream about? Something like space-faring? Armstrong’s address must have been a debris field of clichés. Life’s noblest goal is to leave the world better than you found it, he said. Ah, yes, maybe just stick with the goal of leaving the world and projecting yourself into the beyond. Wouldn’t that act, in its very audaciousness, spark excitement around the world and, indeed, make it better?

I wanted poetry from the first man on the moon. Norman Mailer memorably portrayed Armstrong as the very definition of laconic. Here’s Mailer quoting Armstrong’s halting description — or defense — of the impending moonshot: “‘I think we’re going,’ he said, and paused, static burning in the yaws of his pause, ‘I think we’re going to the moon because it’s in the nature of the human being to face challenges.'”

Today I’m challenged to imagine what I said to that human being around that handshake. Nice job, Neil, in living out the dream? Thanks for appearing so coolly competent, so self-assured, so tranquil, as you maneuvered your way onto Tranquility Base? Oh, by the way, do you ever feel hemmed in by your earthbound life? What do you think about on a cloudless autumn night with that big, glowing moon high above you, reminding you, beckoning you, taunting you?

We no longer have space-age heroes, but we have space-age chronicles. (To say nothing of the genre of science fiction; Jules Verne’s 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon is seen as inspiring the early rocket makers.) A couple of new titles appeared this past spring. One is Beyond: Our Future in Space, whose author, Chris Impey, is a university distinguished professor and deputy head of the astronomy department at the University of Arizona. Impey imagines a bright space-based future, with space elevators replacing clunky launch vehicles, solar sails as aids to propulsion, the “greening” of alien planets, the rampant commercialization of space, and the first baby born off Earth.

Impey’s earthbound discussion is just as interesting, particularly his musings on the human imperative to explore. “After tens of thousands of generations on the African savanna, we spread across the Americas in a few hundred,” he writes. “This rapid, purposeful exploration of new worlds is in its way as dramatic in terms of leaving our comfort zone and embracing the unknown as our decision to leave the Earth when we developed the technology to do so.” Psychologists, he tells us, have found that humans are unique in the way they connect play and imagination: After children develop the necessary motor skills, imagination kicks in, and they’re led to investigate the physical environment.

It may be too much to say we’re hardwired for exploration; after all, it can also be an evolutionary advantage to veer away from dangerous and disruptive thrill seeking. But there are traits that favor adventurousness, and those traits are self-reinforcing: Successful nomads encounter new sources of food; the best users and makers of tools come up with new tools and novel applications of existing tools. So are we natural boundary breakers, including the boundary that leads us into space?

It’s a different story, one about retreating from rather than breaking through boundaries, that Margret Lazarus Dean tells in Leaving Orbit: Notes from the Last Days of American Spaceflight. Dean, an associate professor of English at the University of Tennessee, talks to technicians, astronauts and space enthusiasts. She is on the scene leading up to the shuttle’s last days. Her book is a pursuit of this question: “What does it mean that we have been going to space for fifty years and have decided to stop?” Her answer, in part, is: “Maybe it’s only a fantasy that the explorers of the past were met with better funding and smoother travels. Maybe they all had to beg for money; they all found themselves doing less than had been planned, less than had been hoped for.”

Dean says it’s temptingly simplistic to romanticize the past, including the heroic past of spaceflight. “When we think about the Apollo project now, we think of it as being a time when all Americans were united behind a project they could take pride in. The fact is that Americans were slowly falling out of love with Apollo right from the beginning.”

Even before the first moonwalk, she points out, only about a third of Americans so loved the idea that they thought the moon project was worth the cost. At the same time, a clear majority of Americans throughout the 1960s said they approved of Apollo. You can’t really bring those views into alignment. For that matter, you can’t really reconcile Tranquility Base on the moon and landing zones in Vietnam — the world rejoicing, the world fracturing, all at once. In Dean’s view, uneasiness about the cost of spaceflight has always been paired with widespread positive feelings about spaceflight. As she puts it: “Hugely wasteful; hugely grand. Adjust the focus of your eyes and the same project goes from being the greatest accomplishment of humankind to a pointless show of misspent wealth.”

Today’s space-related feelings are hardly strong enough to rise to the level of ambivalence; it’s more a pervasive attitude of resignation or, as Dean suggests, a feedback loop of low expectations and low returns. We elect representatives who underfund NASA, and then we blame NASA for its lack of vision. We’re left with “a simple and frustratingly predictable pattern.” NASA comes up with a grand plan for getting to Mars, or for getting back to the moon, or for building a space station, or for traveling to an asteroid. The plan is called too ambitious, or certainly too expensive. “In that rare instance when a plan is approved, it’s always in a scaled-back way, always a compromise of the original lofty vision.”

Dean suggests a correlation between America’s self-confidence, as expressed in the heroic space age, and the “voicey” quality that came, around the same time, with the New Journalism. The New Journalists didn’t exactly invent creative nonfiction. But with their overt borrowing of novelistic techniques, they helped attach it to an age of new forms, new possibilities, new exuberance.

Two of those New Journalists drew on spaceflight, and they earn a place in Dean’s book, as well as in her creative nonfiction teaching. One was Mailer, whose Of a Fire on the Moon, from 1970, centers on the moonshot (and on Mailer himself). He writes about the odd melding of technology and the tropics in America’s Florida spaceport, the presumably “holy task” shared by NASA’s workers, and his own readiness to accept a curious “legend” around Neil Armstrong. In a recurring dream, Armstrong supposedly was able to hover over the ground if he held his breath. “It was beautiful because it might soon prove to be prophetic, beautiful because it was profound and it was mysterious, beautiful because it was appropriate to a man who would land on the moon.”

At one point, Mailer describes Armstrong and his fellow astronauts as forming “the core of some magnetic human force called Americanism, patriotism, or Waspitude.” Wolfe, of course, has a pithier term for all of that, captured in his title The Right Stuff, published in 1979.

Wolfe has always been interested in illuminating big cultural moments through character studies. In The Right Stuff, his interest was a cultural moment of anxiety and possibility. America was surging, but the Soviet threat was looming. The competition was on, and a competition needed competitors worthy of its significance.

“As to just what this ineffable quality was… well, it obviously involved bravery,” he writes. “But it was not bravery in the simple sense of being willing to risk your life.” In the context of Cold War-fueled patriotism, the idea was that “a man should have the ability to go up in a hurtling piece of machinery and put his hide on the line and then have the moxie, the reflexes, the experience, the coolness, to pull it back in the last yawning moment — and then to go up again the next day, and the next day, and every next day, even if the series should prove infinite — and, ultimately, in its best expression, do so in a cause that means something to thousands, to a people, a nation, to humanity, to God.”

Today it seems presumptive to bring God’s sensibilities into the picture. But with or without divine sanction, the very notion of spaceflight seems to reside more comfortably in history than in the present — or in the future. Maybe it resides with the “space tourists” who pay between $ 20 million and $ 40 million each to leave Earth for ten days or so and go to the ISS, via Russia’s Soyuz vehicle. Astronaut Chris Hadfield refers to them in An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth. Hadfield — who earned some degree of social media fame with his floating astronaut cover of David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” — calls the ISS “every science fiction book come true, every little kids’ dream realized: A large, capable, fully human creation orbiting up in the universe.” A claim of astronomical dimensions.

Hadfield, in the book, pays due respect to “the desire to explore” that’s “in our DNA.” He emphasizes the role of the International Space Station as “a testing ground,” a place to figure out “how to make a spaceship that’s fully self-contained so we can safely venture farther into the universe, and how to keep human beings healthy while doing that.” Is today’s prime directive, though, to venture farther, or to define ourselves within 140 characters?

Near the end of Beyond, Chris Impey writes, hopefully: “We stand at the edge of a vast cosmic shore. We’ve dipped our toes into the water and found it bracing but inviting. Time to jump in.”

That’s one kind of dream — a big, bold jump akin to Neil Armstrong’s hovering over whatever is earthbound. Then there’s the dream recounted by Margaret Lazarus Dean. She’s sitting with Mailer, Wolfe and others, the scribes of space faring. They’re tiny figures seated in the vastness of Kennedy Space Center’s Vehicle Assembly Building. “We wait on our folding chairs. We are waiting for something to happen, but we wait and wait and it never gets started.”

I look to see what’s happening at NASA, according to its website. There’s mention of an astronaut preparing to spend a year in orbit, perhaps in a challenge to Hadfield’s pseudo-celebrity. A perfectly circular explanation: He’ll be up there for a long stretch so we can better understand what it’s like to be up there for a long stretch. ISS, his habitat, is the third-brightest object in the sky, says the website. ISS: “Off the Earth, for the Earth,” as NASA has it. But what, exactly is that bright object for, and where, exactly, will it take us?

Finally, I land on this, a statement by NASA’s administrator: “I am deeply disappointed that the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee does not fully support NASA’s plan to once again launch American astronauts from U.S. soil as soon as possible.” There we have it: a trajectory from the right stuff, the audaciousness that fired up the space age, to a hoped-for launch of some kind of vehicle, for some kind of purpose, around some kind of timeline — as soon as possible.

Robert J. Bliwise is editor of Duke Magazine and teaches magazine journalism at Duke University. He has written for The American Scholar and The Chronicle of Higher Education, among other publications.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Arts – The Huffington Post
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E3 2015 Countdown to E3: GT Live Coverage Details

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It’s almost showtime! We’ll be live streaming all week; from the first press conference to a special GT Live Friday night.
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E3 2015 Countdown to E3: Ubisoft

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We’ve already seen The Division, Rainbow Six, and the next Assassin’s Creed. What other surprises could Ubisoft be hiding within their E3 2015 Press Conference?
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E3 2015 Countdown to E3: Warner Bros. Interactive

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With Batman, Mad Max, and all the brands LEGO Dimensions is mixing together, WB is escorting some big friends to E3. Will their games be good enough to bring these popular properties to life?
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GT Countdown Top Ten Konami Franchises

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Everyone’s got opinions about Konami this year, but what are the franchises they should fight the hardest to hang onto. We fondly recall their greatest work dating all the way back to the NES.
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60 Minute Countdown to the Perfect Wedding

60 Minute Countdown to the Perfect Wedding


This is it! The countdown to the biggest day of your life starts right here with The Wedding Fairy’s international series of best-selling e-guides to planning a perfect wedding stress free and on budget. Knowing where to start in putting together the biggest day of your life can often be a daunting task, but luckily The Wedding Fairy has done all the hard work for you, so all you need to do is sit back, relax and soak up every second of this ultimate wedding day checklist, also known as the big day bible. In just 60 minutes you will be armed with all the information and everything you need to make your big day simply unforgettable – without feeling overwhelmed or bogged down in unnecessary detail. Yes, in just one hour you will know exactly what you need to do and when your wedding all sorted in a lunch break! This is the essential e-book every bride-to-be needs, not just for peace of mind, but more importantly to spark the imagination and get the creative juices flowing. So what’s inside? Well, firstly The Wedding Fairy will take you through his three planning fundamentals of budget potentially saving you thousands in cash, how to prepare for the planning process in general and ways to create a stand-out wedding day look without breaking the bank and that’s all before the big breakdown even commences! Next up it’s onto the countdown itself starting with a clear plan of action for sourcing your dream venue and how to spend wisely to make your cash go further. From this point, we move into finding all your suppliers (flowers, cake, stationery, transport, entertainment etc) and of course picking the dress! On top of this we have the grooms outfit to sort, wedding favours to design, the all important speeches to plan, a honeymoon destination to choose and technical details to consider such as insurance and the legalities of planning a wedding. Also included is The Wedding Fairy’s guide to all your essential questions with tips for making the wedding weather-proof,

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E3 2015 Countdown to E3: Activision / Blizzard

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Guitar Hero, Black Ops III and Tony Hawk are making headlines, and even Blizzard is making an appearance. What else can we expect from Activision at the show?
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E3 2015 Countdown to E3: Bethesda

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The publisher of DOOM, Dishonored, and Fallout are kicking off the E3 press conference season a day early. Do they have enough on deck to justify their own event?
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The Baby Name Countdown: 140,000 Popular And Unusual Baby Names

The Baby Name Countdown: 140,000 Popular And Unusual Baby Names


A classic, the baby name countdown (over 120,000 copies sold) is now fully revised and updated for the first time in a decade. Featuring more names than any other guide and based on more than 2.5 million birth records, the book includes brand-new data, a new introduction, a revised section on the most popular baby names of the past year and decade, and updated popularity ratings throughout. Discover at a glance the most popular given names from each decade of the 20th and 21st centuries, meanings and origins of the 3,000 top names, and thousands of rare and exotic monikers. Whether your taste in names is trendy, traditional, or international, The Baby Name Countdown is the ideal resource for every parent searching for the perfect name.
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GT Countdown Top Ten Live Action Trailers

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Bringing a video game world to life isn’t as easy as it looks. Believe it or not, there are 10 live-action trailers that actually make their games look good. Lights! Camera! Countdown!
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The Baby Name Countdown

The Baby Name Countdown


A classic, the baby name countdown (over 120,000 copies sold) is now fully revised and updated for the first time in a decade. Featuring more names than any other guide and based on more than 2.5 million birth records, the book includes brand-new data, a new introduction, a revised section on the most popular baby names of the past year and decade, and updated popularity ratings throughout. Discover at a glance the most popular given names from each decade of the 20th and 21st centuries, meanings and origins of the 3,000 top names, and thousands of rare and exotic monikers. Whether your taste in names is trendy, traditional, or international, The Baby Name Countdown is the ideal resource for every parent searching for the perfect name.

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GT Countdown Top Ten Canceled Games

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These incredible ideas will never get made and it kills us. We almost wish we had never heard about them in the first place.
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The Baby Name Countdown: 140,000 Popular and Unusual Baby Names

The Baby Name Countdown: 140,000 Popular and Unusual Baby Names


A classic, the baby name countdown (over 120,000 copies sold) is now fully revised and updated for the first time in a decade. Featuring more names than any other guide and based on more than 2.5 million birth records, the book includes brand-new data, a new introduction, a revised section on the most popular baby names of the past year and decade, and updated popularity ratings throughout. Discover at a glance the most popular given names from each decade of the 20th and 21st centuries, meanings and origins of the 3,000 top names, and thousands of rare and exotic monikers. Whether your taste in names is trendy, traditional, or international, "The Baby Name Countdown" is the ideal resource for every parent searching for the perfect name.
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GT Countdown Top Ten Robots

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Sometimes, when you need a friend, you have to build one. We assemble all the greatest creations in video games and determine who is the most loyal and effective.
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Countdown to Baby: Answers to the 100 Most Asked Questions about Pregnancy and Childbirth

Countdown to Baby: Answers to the 100 Most Asked Questions about Pregnancy and Childbirth


Offering a valuable collection of questions most commonly asked by her patients, Dr. Warhus provides straightforward answers to issues that almost every pregnant woman has on her mind. Questions run the gamut from how to cope with morning sickness, indigestion, and acne to the pros and cons of C-sections, the risks of pre-eclampsia and hypertension, and managing pain during labor. Topics covered include selecting the best doctor; the benefits of midwives; the role of a doula in the birthing process; treatments for morning sickness; over-the-counter medications for colds and headaches; restrictions to exercise; advances in 3D and 4D ultrasounds; and labor concerns.

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GT Countdown Top Ten Mispronounced Words in Gaming

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No matter how you choose to say these words, they’re pronounced wrong more often than any others in this industry. Here is our earnest effort to set things straight.
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What Adam Pally Can Say About The ‘Happy Endings’ Countdown Clock

Last month, the long-dormant Twitter account run by the writers of “Happy Endings” shared a cryptic link that sent fans to a page featuring a countdown clock. “It’s almost a new day,” reads the site, with time ticking down to April 1, aka April Fools’ Day.


But despite the fact that the clock could be an elaborate ruse, fans of the canceled series were tantalized by the possibility of a renaissance. “The thought that ‘Happy Endings’ might actually be resurrected is probably the most ah-mah-zing thing I’ve heard in a long time,” wrote Natalie Abrams at Entertainment Weekly. “I need to know what this means. I’m, like, stress-vomiting with anticipation,” tweeted TVLine staff editor Andy Swift.

In the weeks since the @happywrites account posted the link, many have speculated that some kind of second life for the show could materialize. (After the tweet, the account also followed streaming services Netflix, Amazon and Yahoo Screen.)

Former “Happy Endings” stars Damon Wayans Jr. and Adam Pally left their respective regular roles on “New Girl” and “The Mindy Project,” while Eliza Coupe’s show “Benched” was canceled. And while other “Happy Endings” cast members Casey Wilson, Zachary Knighton and Elisha Cuthbert are currently involved in different series, none of those shows have been picked up for future seasons. What does it all mean?

“I can’t tell you anything,” Pally told The Huffington Post during an interview at South by Southwest to promote his new film, “Night Owls,” which debuted at the festival on Friday. “I know as much as you.”

But after Pally was pressed to provide some concrete information by his “Night Owls” co-star, Rosa Salazar, he did offer one tidbit.

“I’ll tell you this: I know the origin of that ‘Happy Endings’ countdown clock was not intended to be where it is headed,” he said. “That’s as much as I can give you.”

Check back on Monday for more from Pally and Salazar on “Night Owls.” This year’s South by Southwest Film Festival runs until March 21.
Comedy – The Huffington Post
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Jimmy Fallon Explains The Reason For Netflix’s Countdown Between Episodes

Have you ever wondered why Netflix has that countdown between episodes? Well, that worrisome thought will never interrupt your binge-watching again.

While writing his weekly “Thank You Notes,” Jimmy Fallon finally explained the reason for the streaming service’s timer. Apparently, Netflix does it just to mess with us. The company knows we’re going to keep watching, and they want us to know that they know.

For the record, Netflix does give you the option to opt out of automatically playing the next episode. It’s currently available on a number of devices.

But if you haven’t heard, the new season of “House of Cards” is coming out next month, and Netflix has plans to premiere up to 20 new shows or new seasons of original shows a year. So really, why bother?

“The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” airs weeknights at 11:35 p.m. ET on NBC.
Comedy – The Huffington Post
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Cinderella Official Sneak Peek – Countdown to Midnight (2015) – Helena Bonham Carter Movie HD

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Cinderella Official Sneak Peek – Countdown to Midnight (2015) – Helena Bonham Carter Movie HD

A live-action retelling of the classic fairy tale about a servant step-daughter who wins the heart of a prince.

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Darwin Awards Countdown to Extinction Book: 9780525951919

Darwin Awards Countdown to Extinction Book: 9780525951919


Darwin Awards Countdown to Extinction Book: The Darwin Awards is a pop culture phenomenon. Honoring those who improve the species by accidentally removing themselves from it, The Darwin Awards countdown (to human extinction) is well under way-and we won’t exit this mortal coil without one last laugh
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