Tiffany Opens Concept Store in Tokyo’s Center of Youth Culture

Tiffany Gets Catty: Tiffany & Co. opened a new concept store in Tokyo Friday, the first of its kind in Japan. Unlike the upscale locales of many of its other stores, this one is located between the youth centers of Shibuya and Harajuku, on what is known as Cat Street. A pedestrian thoroughfare that is a popular shopping destination, the street is mainly home to outdoor and athletic brand stores, used clothing shops and stores dedicated to lower-priced diffusion lines of luxury brands.
The Tiffany store occupies an entire building with 5,059 square feet of floor space spread across six split levels. Its design and displays show whimsy and creativity, all while relying on only two colors: white and Tiffany blue.
Just inside the entrance is a vending machine selling perfumes, the lower level has two instant customization corners where customers can get their own drawings or messages engraved onto jewelry and immediately take it home, and there is a permanent Tokyo-themed photo booth. The top level has Japan’s first Tiffany café, a casual eatery based on a retro American diner, complete with vinyl booth seating and hot dogs on the menu. A spokesman for the brand said that while the company

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A Pop Culture Shock After the Trip of a Lifetime

Our 52 Places Traveler thought she could rely on downloads as armor against the unknowns of global travel. That’s not how it went down.
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Viacom Launches Spark Internal Summit With Eye on Corporate Culture

Viacom will roll out an ambitious internal corporate initiative dubbed Spark that aims to engage and energize the company’s 10,000 employees with an expansive slate of conference-style programming. Viacom president-CEO Bob Bakish calls Spark “a multi-market next generation town hall.” The sessions kick off Tuesday with a 50-minute Q&A with Bakish and Viacom vice chair […]

Variety

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How Mister Rogers’ Life of Quiet Grace Turned Him Into an Unlikely Pop Culture Hero 16 Years After His Death

'Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood, Fred RogersFred Rogers isn’t your typical pop culture icon.
As the host of the long-running PBS children’s program Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, he wasn’t slick or sarcastic, hip or…

E! Online (US) – TV News

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At a glance: Pullman, Packham among culture figures in New Year Honours

A look at some of the leading arts and entertainment figures recognised for their achievements.
BBC News – Entertainment & Arts

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Backstreet’s Back (on Tour) and More: 6 Things to Know From the Week in Pop Culture

What you need to know from today’s TV, music and movie news.
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Orson Welles’ Final Movie and More: 7 Things to Know From the Week in Pop Culture

What you need to know from this week’s TV, music and movie news.
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Bella Thorne’s Cats, Big Bird and More: Your Week in Pop Culture

What you need to know from this week’s TV, music and movie news.
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Perry Ellis Supports Hispanic Culture With Cubavera Art Project

Perry Ellis International Inc. took its mind off Thursday’s shareholders’ vote to go private by occupying itself with creative pursuits.   
National Hispanic Heritage Month may have ended Oct. 15, but that hasn’t stopped the company from observing its Latin American roots. Its Cubavera men’s wear brand keeps the party going with a live auction of original commissioned artworks through Nov. 1, within its multifaceted campaign #CubaveraIcons. Three works by Gustavo Novoa, Alexander Mijares and Edward Granger, who previously created custom guayaberas at a live painting event and has collaborated with Hermès and Ralph Lauren, premiered on the brand’s and artists’ web sites and social media channels before their live auction on Paddle8.com.
PEI president and chief executive officer Oscar Feldenkreis said the artists were each chosen for their unique style. “They represent a multicultural mix, again in line with the Cubavera brand, which has translated across demographics and has grown into a staple for a multicultural and multigenerational consumer,” he said.
The only parameters for the artists were to draw inspiration from the collection. Novoa zeroed in on its signature prints and PEI’s home base in Miami with a painting of Florida panthers primping in tropical shirts. Titled the Front Runners, his work starts at $ 3,500

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How to Disconnect From ‘Always On’ Work Culture

In our ‘Always On’ world, colleagues text and email us at all hours, expecting a quick response. But with these strategies, you can be happily out of reach—and not out of a job.
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"Manifest" Stars Josh & Melissa Play 'Pop Culture Plane Game'

Josh Dallas & Melissa Roxburgh from NBC's missing plane series put their knowledge to the test about all the aircraft drama to ever exist in pop culture. Watch!
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Juicy Couture Pokes Fun at Influencer Culture in New Campaign

Juicy Couture is getting in line with social media standards, tongue-in-cheek.
The brand unveiled today its fall 2018 global campaign: a play on influencer culture that features seven models posing as “influencers.” Photographed in New York City by Stas May, the images include a tag line that reads “paid partnership with Juicy Couture,” as well as the models’ Instagram handles and #JuicyAd.

Nisaa Pouncey in Juicy Couture’s Fall 2018 campaign. 
Courtesy Image

The #JuicyAd campaign pokes fun at influencer culture, specifically how the majority of influencer posts are now paid for by a brand. The models featured are Nisaa Pouncey (@nisaapouncey), Devon Lee Carlson (@devonleecarlson), Ashley Shoemaker (@ashley.shoemakerr), Charlene Almarvez (@charlenealmarvez), Issa Lish (@issallen), Tanya Kizko (@tanyakizko) and @reltubatokad. Their followings range in size from a few thousand to nearly 400,000.

Issa Lish in Juicy Couture’s fall 2018 campaign. 
Courtesy Image

Influencer culture continues to reach new heights. Last week, RewardStyle announced a forthcoming coffee-table book on influencers due out in September. Simultaneously, anti-influencer accounts like Gelcream are emerging, swearing off #SponCon in the process.
Still, data shows that influencers are more powerful than ever, and brands are facing increased competition to work with the top ones. Juicy Couture is the latest to get in on the action —

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Gucci and Frieze Commission Films on Eighties Youth Culture

MILAN — Gucci and Frieze have commissioned Turner Prize winner Jeremy Deller and filmmaker and visual artist Josh Blaaberg to create films to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Second Summer of Love, the explosion of electronic music and youth culture that took place in 1988 in the U.K. and across Europe.
In particular, the Second Summer of Love series will explore Acid House’s impact on international contemporary culture, retracing its origins from the Italian disco scene of the mid-Eighties to rave’s role in rebuilding British identity, passing through the adoption of European synth sounds in the house and techno cultures of Chicago, Detroit and New York.
Deller will present “Everybody in The Place: An incomplete history of Britain 1984-1992,” which investigates the social changes that reshaped 1980s Britain through rare and unseen archive materials, mapping the journey from protest movements to abandoned warehouse raves. The footage will include images of an A-level politics class discovering these stories for the first time, showing the perspective of a generation which considers the facts already an ancient history.

A still from Jeremy Deller’s movie “Everybody in the Place: An Incomplete History of Britain 1984-1992.” 
Courtesy Photo

Blaaberg combines fiction and archival footage in its “Distant Planet: The six chapters of

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Dystopia, Apocalypse, Culture War: 2018 or 1968?

The upheaval of 50 years ago is hardly history at the movies — from zombies to concerns about male-dominated Hollywood, what happened continues to reverberate.
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material culture: Who Bought Sylvia Plath’s Stuff?

A tartan kilt, fishing rod and dragon pendant were among items auctioned recently by the poet’s daughter, Frieda Hughes.
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McKayla Maroney Says ‘Messed Up’ Gymnastics Culture Made Her Rely on Abuser Larry Nassar for Food

As McKayla Maroney trained at the 2012 London Olympics, she says it was now-convicted child molester Larry Nassar who would sneak food to her when the strict coaches weren’t looking — and used the “messed up” gymnastics culture as a way to further manipulate.

“I think I would’ve starved at the Olympics if I didn’t have him bring me food,” Maroney, 22, told NBC News, in an excerpt of an interview that aired on Today Thursday morning, adding that she felt like she “needed” Nassar. “Your coaches are just always watching you. And wanting to keep you skinny. There’s just other things about the culture that are also messed up that he used against us.”

Maroney says the former USA Gymnastics doctor would “buy me a loaf of bread” in an effort to groom her and take advantage of the unhealthy conditions.

The former Olympian spoke to Savannah Guthrie in her first-ever television interview about the abuse for a Dateline special airing this Sunday evening. The special also features the first-ever TV interview with famed gymnastics coaches Bela and Martha Karolyi about the Nassar scandal. An excerpt of Maroney’s interview also aired on Today Wednesday morning.

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“He told me he was going to do a checkup on me, and that was the first day I was abused,” the Olympian said in the clip that aired Wednesday morning, alleging that Nassar molested her hundreds of times. “ every time I saw him.”

RELATED: Olympian McKayla Maroney Says Child Molester Larry Nassar Abused Her ‘Hundreds’ of Times

Officials with USA Gymnastics and the U.S. Olympic Committee have praised Maroney for her bravery. USA Gymnastics apologized to the athletes in a statement and said officials are “committed to doing everything we can to prevent this from happening again.”

Maroney initially revealed the alleged abuse in an October Twitter post, writing then that the abuse lasted until she left the sport.

“He said that nobody would understand this and the sacrifice that it takes to get to the Olympics, so you can’t tell people this,” Maroney recalled to NBC. “He didn’t say it in a way that was mean or anything like that.

“I actually was like, ‘That makes sense. I don’t want to tell anybody about this.’ And I didn’t believe that they would understand.”

Maroney isn’t the only athlete to open up about the conditions in the sport that enabled the child molester. In March, Olympic gymnast Aly Raisman described the famous Karolyi Ranch as “disgusting” and told the Washington Post that there was a culture of fear at the world-famous training camp. Raisman has also filed suit against the USOC and USA Gymnastics, alleging that the organizations failed to implement safeguards at the Karolyi ranch, leaving the gymnasts vulnerable to abuse at Nassar’s hands.

“The shower smelled like eggs, and we would bring sandals to wear because it was so disgusting,” Raisman told the Post. “After you showered you were like, ‘I almost feel dirtier than before.’ ”

She added: “Nobody wanted to be the one who was difficult. Now that I’m away from the sport it makes me so angry that we were afraid to ask for soap.”

Earlier this year, the disgraced former gymnastics doctor received lengthy sentences in Michigan’s Eaton and Ingham counties for sexually abusing girls and women for several years. In both hearings, several victims read emotional impact statements to the court.

Nassar has been called “the most prolific child molester in history.”

More than 250 women and girls have accused Nassar of assault, including gymnasts Aly RaismanSimone BilesMcKayla Maroney and Gabby Douglas.


PEOPLE.com

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Jean Touitou on A.P.C. and French Culture

PARIS — Jean Touitou is taking A.P.C. to the catwalk this season. “I feel ready for it now,” he says.
The designer has been known to tinker with presentation formats — staff modeled clothing in a store on one occasion while professional models grooved to music at a cabaret on another.
The freedom is, no doubt, one perk of remaining independent, which Touitou has insisted on over the decades.
A.P.C. was one of the earliest labels to establish itself in the now-thriving field of contemporary French brands, serving those who want style without an overblown price tag.
Speaking in the cozy, book-lined meeting room of his Paris headquarters — Touitou calls it “my oval office” — he reflected on the brand’s longevity and hinted at future expansion.
He also relayed his doubts about artificial intelligence and explained how he got the secret behind a raw Japanese denim used by the brand — it didn’t happen overnight.
WWD: Do you think that A.P.C. exists because of the larger conglomerates or in spite of them — has it been difficult to carve out a space for your brand?
Jean Touitou: We are not doing the same work at all. Last Saturday, my son took me to a restaurant that had

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Adidas Panel Talks Basketball Culture in Fashion

Refinement of just what defines streetwear is now emerging with the segment’s continued rise, and a panel of designers drawing inspiration from the court sought to tackle basketball’s influence on fashion as much of Los Angeles gears up for Sunday’s NBA All-Star Game.
Adidas, while plenty of its crew prepped for its 747 Warehouse event, on Thursday evening took over sneaker store Nice Kicks and an adjacent parking lot in downtown Los Angeles to celebrate the launch of its Boost You Wear shoe collaboration with local label Bristol Studio.
A panel featuring Bristol cofounder and creative director Luke Tadashi, Eric Emanuel of his own namesake label and Adidas’ Brooklyn Creator Farm vice president and creative director Denis Dekovic led a thoughtful conversation on basketball’s reemerging influence on fashion.
“I think basketball for a little while got a little bit cold and there was no excitement,” Tadashi said. “We’re at a time right now where it’s almost a renaissance, where players are able to express themselves, especially walking through the tunnel [before a game] so they can show you how they look off the court. It’s exciting to see.”
Emanuel recalled watching Allen Iverson, noting the athlete as a style icon.
“You’re starting to see people

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Here’s What Was Happening in Pop Culture When Paris Hilton Released Her First (and Only) Album

Paris Hilton, 2006Nothing in this world matters today except one thing…
Paris Hilton released new music.
Yes, the 36-year-old DJ dropped “I Need You” just in time for Valentine’s…

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E!'s 12 Days of Pop Culture

There's only 12 days until Christmas, so let's take a look at 2017's best pop culture gifts and enjoy it to the tune of "12 Days of Christmas."
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Denmark’s Underdog City: A Travel Guide to Scandinavia’s Newest Capital of Culture

Copenhagen hogs the spotlight, but for radical Danish architecture, cutting-edge food and plenty of hygge, head to Aarhus.
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The Culture Is Changing, With Feminist Cheese

All across America, cheese making is a great way to trot away from the male herd.
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Books of The Times: ‘Sticky Fingers’ Captures Rolling Stone’s Jann Wenner and the Culture He Helped Create

The biographer Joe Hagan understands why a rock magazine editor matters to the history of the 20th century.
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For Amazon, Can Two Headquarters Still Equal One Culture?

In planning Amazon’s second headquarters, CEO Jeff Bezos faces a new challenge: how to maintain the online retail giant’s carefully cultivated culture when he can’t be in two places at once.
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Traditions Revived at a Tribal Culture Camp

An ancient ceremonial practice of regalia is flourishing anew. For the Yurok Indians it is art — and a conduit to the spirit world.
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How Peaches Became A Pop Culture ‘Fetish’

Both Selena Gomez and Lana Del Rey recently made reference to the fleshy fruit. But why?
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How Peaches Became A Pop Culture ‘Fetish’

Both Selena Gomez and Lana Del Rey recently made reference to the fleshy fruit. But why?
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Are Millennials Destroying Pop Culture? Short Answer: No.

Our resident Old Guys™ debate technology with a Certified Millennial™.

Lifestyle – Esquire

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Africa’s Gabonese Culture Is About to Have Its Fashion Moment

Designer Teddy Ondo Ella is bringing his country’s aesthetic to the world.

Style – Esquire

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Have We Become An Angry Dating Culture?

I’m seeing a really disturbing trend out there.

I want you to take this time right now to read every single word that I’m writing.

I don’t want you to glance through this article, because if you’re single, this is by far the most important thing you've ever read in your life.

I’m going to start off with this:

How frustrated are you now in your dating life?

If you can write that down right now, write the one word that describes how you feel in your dating life right now.

Over the last couple of years, I’ve noticed a really disturbing trend when it comes down to dating.

The word that we used to have a long time ago, before the flood of Internet dating sites and dating apps and social media validation.

And all these ridiculous ways to get lost in cyber world.

The word that people used to use in dating was a magical word, it was called hope.

People got excited about finding a new mate.

People got excited about finding a new partner.

People went out and actually talked to one another.

If you’re a woman reading this article right now, I want you to think, when was the last time a man came over and approached you and flirted with you?

If you’re a man reading this, I want you to think, when was the last time you actually walked over and actually took a dare and flirted with a woman?

I want you to also ask yourself this question: when you're out in public, how often do you look at your cell phone?

Everybody is angry right now because everybody is escaping.

We’ve become a dating culture – especially in the western world – of people who are swiping and hoping that they’ll stumble across the right photo, the right picture, the perfect person.

Dating has become a paradoxic choice. It’s almost like shopping on Amazon.com for stereo equipment.

You take a look, you read the reviews and you see if – after reading reviews from random strangers – this is the perfect thing for you. And don’t even get me started on how dating is only a review away. Pretty soon there’s going to be a review site, a major one, a major breakthrough where people will post about their exes, and then you’re going to find out the truth about everybody and the next thing you know, it’s going to feed this dating anger even more.

Let’s even get more honest with today. When was the last time you went out on a date with somebody and didn’t Google them ahead of time so you can have a preconceived story about what you think they are due to somebody else’s opinion of them on Google?

Or maybe an article they wrote because well, in today’s neurotic world, we can go deeper and deeper into the void.

It used to be this magical moment: boy meets girl.

Boy asks girl out, actually calls her on a thing called the telephone, not a texting device. Your iPhone is a phone, people, not an iText.

There would be this anticipation. There would be nerves.

At the end of the date, you’d wonder if you liked each other, you’d do a post-date re-cap with your friends and you’d give that person another chance.

Now, there’s no post-date re-cap anymore. It’s either a yes or a no immediately. You don’t think about it because when you do. You go back into the illusional, delusional world of swipe dating.

Because we always know there’s going to be something better, because that’s the way we’ve been programmed.

And this is why people are so frustrated. People are frustrated and angry. Women are angrier than ever before.

I know this factually. I’ve been coaching women for a long time and as the years go by, women get more and more angry.

They feel like they are running out of time.

I'm in my 30's, when am I going to have my children, when am I going to meet that guy?

I'm in my 40's, I haven't met him yet. When am I going to find the man that I'm supposed to marry and live happily ever after.

I'm in my 50's and I'm running out of time. I'm not going to be pretty for a long time and all men want is younger women.

It just goes on and on and on. Women have this accelerator down they feel like they have no time left in the world, that they are just aging at 100 miles per hour and they get angry and pissed off that nobody is seeing their beauty, so they are forced to date the men they don’t want to date.

People are angry out there.

If you ask people how they feel about dating, most people will say they hate it.

To me, I’d ask why do you hate dating? It’s an opportunity to meet someone you’ve never met before. It’s so amazing because it gives you an opportunity to have the relationship you’ve never had.

If you’re not open, how do you expect to even meet somebody? And yet, we do all of these ridiculous things, pretending we’re open.

Swiping. Social media posting. We have this illusion of a social life. No wonder people hate dating, because we’re not getting anywhere!

We’re like bald snow tires in a snow storm. We just spin and spin and spin and get nowhere, and then when we finally do find somebody…

We try to hit the accelerator button down and try to get to a relationship as quickly as possible so we can avoid the thing that we truly hate: dating.

Folks, you’ve got to lose the anger to find love. Period. End of story. End of rant.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Weddings – The Huffington Post
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Heath Ledger’s Thoughts On ‘Macho Bulls**t Culture’ Should Inspire Us All

Heath Ledger wasn’t one to fall by the wayside. He was constantly pushing himself to be better, learn more and grow within an industry that typically only opens its gates for a select number of artists. 

In “I Am Heath Ledger,” the new documentary airing on Spike Wednesday night, viewers get a glimpse into Ledger’s personal goings-on and what he hoped to accomplish, not just as an actor, but as a “multidimensional artist,” before his tragic and untimely death at age 28 in January 2008. 

“The end game, ultimately, for Heath was to produce and direct feature films, and that passion was leading to some amazing opportunities for him and would have been something incredible for him to fulfill,” director Derik Murray told HuffPost in a sit-down interview following the Tribeca Film Festival premiere of “I Am Heath Ledger” last month. 

Matt Amato, Ledger’s friend who co-founded the production company The Masses with him, echoed that statement to HuffPost, explaining Ledger was ready “to flip the paradigm of this male-driven, macho bullshit culture that we’re drowning in” with his directorial debut, “The Queen’s Gambit,” which was sadly never made. The movie, based on the book of the same name, would have told the story of a woman who struggles with alcohol addiction as she works her way into the chess championships. 

“Matt and many of the [’I Am Heath Ledger’] cast would talk about the fact that Heath would be as interested in what the role had to offer as he was to who the director was,” Murray said of Ledger’s decision to take on certain projects. “He would look at those directors and he would be very much present during the filming and be learning from them each step of the way. He talked about how his passion was to be a director with ‘Queen’s Gambit,’ but it wasn’t to be.” 

Below, Murray, co-director Adrian Buitenhuis, and Amato talk with HuffPost about their documentary and Ledger’s craft, constantly alluding to the fact that everyone can learn a little something from the actor, who left this world far too soon. 

Congratulations on the premiere. Looks like it was a wonderful night. 

Derik Murray: I think what made the Tribeca premiere really special for all of us was that the family was there and many of the close friends that were interviewed for the movie. For many of them, that was the first time they saw the movie and so there was a lot of anticipation on our part as to how that would go ― not fearful, just anticipation — but it was fabulous. Everybody loved the movie.

Had Heath’s family been given the chance to see the film beforehand? 

DM: We showed Heath’s family a rough cut, frankly for the purposes of talking about archive and pulling more material together and making sure we had some of the facts straight. But also, with the trust we built with them, we wanted to extend that [option], so we showed them the rough cut and that was a very emotional experience for them. They called us at 1 o’clock in the morning, very emotional about the movie and very much at the state of mind that they had no idea what it was going to be — they couldn’t really visualize it — but the message loud and clear to us was that it was Heath. It really captured his spirit.

Matt, I’m truly sorry for your loss. This couldn’t have been necessarily easy for you. What was this film process like?

Matt Amato: I’m just coming out of the end of a six-month journey, and I’m relieved. The important thing for me was the family, and they love it, and now it’s about the audience’s feelings about the movie. It exists now for the audience and I hope it’s inspiring for young people to not waste a minute of their life — to really, live, live, live.

What did you want an audience member to leave the theater or a viewing of this film thinking or feeling?

Adrian Buitenhuis: I definitely wanted people to be inspired. Inspired to see what you can do in your life and what you’re capable of. And also to show someone who, even if they gained a lot of success ― at least in Heath’s case ― [didn’t] forget about his friends or his family and kept them really close. It’s a nice testament to how to have relationships in your life. He made everyone close to him feel special in a way. He never looked down on anyone, from what I can tell making the film, and was inspiring his friends to be better and they were inspiring him. To see him as an artist and his work, and being able to work with his work, was really great.

He’s kind of like a director of the movie in a way, because it’s a lot of his photography and footage that’s shown throughout.

DM: We’ve been talking about this for quite some time, is that Heath, in many ways when making the film, would direct the storyline with all the footage that came forward to us. We’ve been calling him a director/co-director/partner all the way through.

How did you go about gathering the photos and footage Heath captured?

DM: When we first started doing the research, we realized Heath was much more than just this star of his generation or his acting ability — he was a multidimensional artist. When we learned that, we did some research on Matt’s involvement and his relationship with Heath and The Masses and, in that world, Heath was in partnership creatively with Matt, in business, and doing some amazing work with music videos and working with various artists, and that was something that Heath was very passionate about. The end game, ultimately, for Heath was to produce and direct feature films together, and that passion was leading to some amazing opportunities for him and would have been something incredible for him to fulfill.

On the footage, through Matt, we had access to these music videos and then Matt was kind enough to open the door to some of the content that Heath had filmed and also content that had been filmed of Heath through his personal journey. That then basically started a dialogue with the family about the content that they might have through the estate and then friends stepped forward and provided us with their content, as well. So it was really a community effort that brought all that content together that you now see on the screen that captures Heath in an amazing way, through his own lens.

For those who only know Heath as an actor, it really opens those doors for you to see him as a human being.

MA: Yes, he was pretty wonderful. We talked a lot about directing and what we’d do if we moved forward with our company together … Heath’s vision was an authentic vision. We were going on to make “The Queen’s Gambit,” which would’ve been his first movie, and I’m sure he was going to nail that. He was going to be working with his favorite cinematographer, Ed Lachman, who does amazing work with Todd Haynes. Heath was so turned on by how Todd works with Ed and he got a lot of clues about how we should work. He was not impressed with big money movies. He really liked how Todd worked with his producer, Christine Vachon, and all the sets and locations. A lot of times when Heath would do a movie, he would just completely drop off the map, because when you’re making a movie you have to stay focused and it’s like a 24-hour day, but I knew that he’d resurface when he was done. But with “I’m Not There,” he called me every day, like, “Man, we did that! And we did this! Oh my God, we’re making art!” He was just so thrilled to be working with Todd Haynes. So, as directors, we were very against the hierarchy kind of thing. When we did our music videos together with the crew, we would be the ones to go to Home Depot and get the mops and the brooms and get food for craft service, so when the crew would arrive, they’d see us doing that stuff …

DM: Heath Ledger on craft service!

AB: That was probably a mean craft service.

MA: Yeah, he really cared about people. But then, once we got there, we would work to his max. Then, he would never really care about people’s complaints, you know, because we had set the bar. His energy and passion is something I think about all the time when I have a camera in my hands. Heath really kicks my butt.

It seems he inspires you to this day. 

MA: I was working on the day he died, on a Bon Iver video in Wisconsin. I didn’t know what to do at that point — the world was just kind of turned upside down in one moment. I really thought long and hard about what I was so supposed to do — stay or go to LA or New York? And I thought to myself, “Well, what would Heath want me to do?” He wants me to shoot with a camera and create something beautiful, that’s what he wants me to do. He doesn’t want me to stop and worry and be sad. So from the moment he died, he was kicking my butt, and he still does it. He gives me the energy to work harder, to explore camera angles and shots, to push myself to make something as excellent as it could possibly be.

The whole thing about Heath’s intelligence and his growth, each movie he did he became smarter — he was really absorbing everything. And that was big for a young person to not come off as a know-it-all or be threatened. He wanted to know. And that curiosity allowed him to be open and get really, really smart. I believe that by the time he died, he was quite brilliant. 

His energy and passion is something I think about all the time when I have a camera in my hands, Heath really kicks my butt.
Matt Amato on Heath Ledger

It would have been nice to see what “The Queen’s Gambit” could have been.

MA: Hopefully we’ll make “Queen’s Gambit.” We’ll do it in St. Louis, with Ed Lachman. St. Louis has now become the chess capital of the world … My little work co-op is right around the corner and there’s the world’s largest chess piece there, and it’s the Queen. It’s like right there, and I look at it and I’m like, “I’m no dummy! I can see the sign!” It’s about a young women, and we really wanted to flip the paradigm of this male-driven, macho bullshit culture that we’re drowning in. I feel like our culture really needs nurturing in this way and we need to be reflective and look at people and deal with people like this.

AB: You guys valued the fact that there was a big community of artists in LA who valued the stuff that didn’t have a place to come together.

MA: Yeah. Heath was ready to chuck LA for the next chapter. He wanted it to be in Brooklyn so he could be near [his daughter with Michelle Williams] Matilda. He was ready to leave all that behind. 

I loved that the film focused on his life and his art at the end, rather than the media circus that surrounded his death.

DM: It’s interesting because we’re doing, and have been doing, a lot of work of this kind where we work with the families and estates. But this film, when the assembly was coming together, there was all sorts of media clips that were helpful in moving the story forward, but Heath’s footage really just kind of took a hold, took a different spirit, and said, “This is the path we’re going to go down.” It was clear that the media footage was completely in contrast with who Heath was. We already learned in the film that it was something he wasn’t comfortable with, so you’re really seeing the true Heath in these one-on-ones or sit-down interviews. As we started pulling those out and letting it breathe, and giving more space to Heath to tell the story, the film really became and transformed itself into the film it is today.

MA: And music was really important to me. I really wanted to flood this production with music. Music that he was responsive to. I wanted music to sail us over the sad parts ― because music can do that, it does transcend. Bon Iver is one of the greatest musicians in the world today and to have his music in our movie is such a gift.

DM: Two fabulous Ben Harper songs are in the film, we’ve got two Bon Iver songs — they’re there for a purpose and a reason, and they’re beautiful. Their compliment to the story is incredible.

MA: Mia Doi Todd, Carlos Niño, Edward Sharpe. These were all people that Heath admired, and there were more to put in, but we had to stop some place.

AB: All the artists were so generous because either Heath had a big impact on their lives or they were just inspired to be a part of it and lend their music to the project. It was a real collective. The same way people brought the footage together, musicians were coming and saying, “Yeah this is important, let’s do this.” And that was great.

DM: That’s why the cast is so eclectic, you know, it’s not just driven by actors that were working with him on films. It has that music component to a significant degree.

To see the moving documentary on Heath Ledger’s life, tune in to Spike at 10 p.m. ET on Wednesday, May 17. 

 

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. 

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French Culture Minister Rewards Six Luxury Artisans

TRADE SKILL MASTERS: French Culture Minister Audrey Azoulay has bestowed the title of Knight of the Order of Arts and Letters to six artisans from French luxury firms, in an annual tradition designed to highlight exceptional skills and encourage young people to follow in their footsteps.
The four women and two men all work for member houses of French luxury goods trade association Comité Colbert, which is behind the initiative.
They are Nathalie Blaise, model maker at Baccarat; Arnaud Davenne, silversmith at Puiforcat; Jacqueline Deverchère, head of the weaving and jacquard atelier at Yves Delorme; Josette Gonnot, expert weaver at Hermès; Eric Lebel, cellar master at Champagne Krug, and Céline Vergne, head of the hand-painting and glazing ateliers at Les Faïenceries de Gien.
“This is the 21st century, but you belong to an ancient tradition. Since thousands of years, mankind has tried to enhance itself through creation and the transformation of matter into beauty,” Azoulay said in her speech, held in the ministry’s gilded reception room overlooking the Palais-Royal courtyard.
“You have succeeded in elevating technique and know-how to the highest level of mastery. You also cultivate the art of precision, of perfection and of the detail that makes all the difference,” she added.
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A Hushed Departure at the Met Museum Reveals Entrenched Management Culture

The museum formerly concentrated power and information in the hands of a few but is vowing to change.
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Creative People Are Saints In Artist’s Beautiful Homage To Culture

On March 16, President Donald Trump released his budget proposal for the fiscal year of 2018, which included plans to eliminate all funding for the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The news, though not quite a surprise, was a devastating blow for the countless Americans who cherish the necessity of creative expression and a vibrant cultural community.

New York-based artist Ventiko had already embarked upon her project “Phos Hilaron: From the Masses Rise the Saints” before Trump officially announced his agenda to slash the NEA and NEH. But Trump was certainly on the artist’s mind when she began to photograph beloved members of her creative community and frame them as patron saints. 

“The thing that really inspired me was the election,” Ventiko told The Huffington Post. “This series was the result of wanting and needing to take action. I had to reclaim my power. I’ve been blessed to know so many talented people and this was my chance to actually exalt them.” 

Ventiko enlisted 30 of her friends, collaborators and muses to serve as the subjects of her divine series. “I was brought up Jewish,” she explained, discussing her interest in religious imagery. “When I was younger, there wasn’t a lot of iconography in my moral teachings. I’ve always been drawn to the communication of morality through imagery and have played a lot with the subversion of symbolism.”

For the project, subject and artist collaborated to determine which “patron saint” the model would embody. The unorthodox roster of holy ones includes everything from “Patron Saint of Beauty” to “Patron Saint of Gender Fluidity” and “Patron Saint of Night Night.” The subjects donned full costumes and makeup to wholly personify each holy figure. 

Far from the traditional cast of holy saints, Ventiko’s creative idols are individuals of all ages, genders, races and styles. The fantastical series captures all the different ways people can embrace the holy spirit ― be that spirit of tea time or 5th Avenue. 

Ventiko then attached each image to a votive candle, and arranged the lot of them in Chinatown Soup gallery. Together, the illuminated portraits converge to form a divine altar with one foot in the New York art scene, the other in the sacred beyond. The glittering lights illuminate the ongoing importance of art-making in a time when the future of creative innovation is riddled with uncertainty. 

For the artist, however, the holy homages respond more to Trump’s agenda in general than the proposed elimination of the NEA. “I really wanted to showcase the beauty of difference and individuality,” Ventiko said. “It’s about owning our stories, owning our truths. Not ‘if you come from this place you are a terrorist,’ or separating people out with walls. There is room for all of us us to establish our identities and to be who we are.”

“Phos Hilaron: From the Masses Rise the Saints” runs until April 2, 2017 at Chinatown Soup in New York.

Tina Fey, Alec Baldwin, Mahershala Ali, Amy Poehler and a whole host of other stars are teaming up for Stand for Rights: A Benefit for the ACLU. Join us at 7 p.m. Eastern on Friday, March 31, on Facebook Live

You can support the ACLU right away. Text POWER to 20222 to give $ 10 to the ACLU. The ACLU will call you to explain other actions you can take to help. Visit www.hmgf.org/t for terms. #StandForRights2017

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Uber vows to end ‘brilliant jerks’ culture

Uber has admitted changes are needed at the scandal-ridden company, but have publicly supported embattled chief executive Travis Kalanick.
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The Culture of Digital Fighting Games

The Culture of Digital Fighting Games


This book examines the complex network of influences that collide in the culture of digital fighting games. Players from all over the world engage in competitive combat with one another, forming communities in both real and virtual spaces, attending tournaments and battling online via internet-connected home game consoles. But what is the logic behind their shared playstyle and culture? What are the threads that tie them together, and how does this inform our understanding of competitive gaming, community, and identity? Informed by observations made at one of the biggest fighting game events in the world – the Evolution Series tournament, or “EVO” – and interviews with fighting game players themselves, this book covers everything from the influence of arcade spaces, to the place of gender and ethnicity in the community, to the clash of philosophies over how these games should be played in the first place. In the process, it establishes the role of technology, gameplay, and community in how these players define both themselves and the games that they play.

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Shoes speak louder – T Culture – Women’s T-Shirt by Spreadshirt

Shoes speak louder – T Culture – Women’s T-Shirt by Spreadshirt

Women’s T-Shirt – Shoes speak louder than words. Great slogan tee by T Culture. – This relaxed fit classic offers plenty of room and is ideal for most body types. Perfect as an outer or under layer, this versatile t-shirt is a must-have for all wardrobes. 100% preshrunk cotton (deep heather color is 50% cotton/50% polyester and heather gray is 90% cotton/10% polyester) Fabric Weight: 5.4 oz (heavyweight) Double-stitched seams at shoulder, sleeve, collar and waist Durable and reliable Available in a wide variety of colors Imported; processed and printed in the U.S.A. + + + With hundreds of designs – Spreadshirt – is the online destination for your favorite tees. Many of our designs are available in mens, womens, youth, kids and baby sizes and come in a variety of different colors. Check our Rakuten store to see them all!

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Books of The Times: Review: ‘American Hookup’ Gives College Sex Culture a Failing Grade

Lisa Wade, a sociologist at Occidental College, has written a study depicting students’ sex lives as a mix of carnality and pervasive disappointment.
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Pilsen Food and Culture Tour in Chicago

Pilsen Food and Culture Tour in Chicago


Looking to get some insider knowledge on one of Chicago’s most vibrant neighborhoods? Look no further because this Pilsen Food and Culture Tour will have you feeling like a local in no time!The Pilsen neighborhood, on Chicago’s West Side, is undoubtedly one of Chicago’s best kept culinary and cultural secrets. This diverse area was originally inhabited by Czechs and Eastern Europeans, both working class and wealthy alike, who did not find themselves welcome in other Chicago neighborhoods. In the 1960’s, however, the area started to become Latino and is now home to some of the best Mexican food, art, and culture around. It is also home to an area known as the “Heart of Chicago,” Chicago’s oldest Italian neighborhood.For this food tour, you will learn about this budding neighborhood and its amazing cuisine from the most qualified guides out there… professional chefs! You will meet your guide at a central Chicago location and embark on your approximately 3.5-hour culinary adventure. Don’t worry about busting out the walking shoes either, for this tour you will be escorted throughout the city in a van with your group. Along the way, you may see beautiful street murals, Al Capone’s Unit at Cook County Jail, and St Paul’s Church. You’ll even pay a quick visit to the Mexican Museum of Art in between tastings!Some tastings may include:Chicago’s Best Italian Beef SandwichChicago’s Best TacosChicago’s Best Shrimpand more!There’s no better way to explore a neighborhood than to taste its cuisine. Make sure you come hungry, because the Pilsen Food and Culture Tour will not disappoint!
List Price: $ 132.00
Price: $ 132.00

Test Your 2016 Pop Culture News Knowledge

Taylor Swift, Tom Hiddleston2016 has sure been a year of “anything can happen”.
From the Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie divorce to Kim Kardashian’s frightening robbery to unexpected celebrity deaths which…

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Culture of the Internet

Culture of the Internet


As we begin a new century, the astonishing spread of nationally and internationally accessible computer-based communication networks has touched the imagination of people everywhere. Suddenly, the Internet is in everyday parlance, featured in talk shows, in special business “technology” sections of major newspapers, and on the covers of national magazines. If the Internet is a new world of social behavior it is also a new world for those who study social behavior. This volume is a compendium of essays and research reports representing how researchers are thinking about the social processes of electronic communication and its effects in society. Taken together, the chapters comprise a first gathering of social psychological research on electronic communication and the Internet. The authors of these chapters work in different disciplines and have different goals, research methods, and styles. For some, the emergence and use of new technologies represent a new perspective on social and behavioral processes of longstanding interest in their disciplines. Others want to draw on social science theories to understand technology. A third group holds to a more activist program, seeking guidance through research to improve social interventions using technology in domains such as education, mental health, and work productivity. Each of these goals has influenced the research questions, methods, and inferences of the authors and the “look and feel” of the chapters in this book. Intended primarily for researchers who seek exposure to diverse approaches to studying the human side of electronic communication and the Internet, this volume has three purposes: * to illustrate how scientists are thinking about the social processes and effects of electronic communication; * to encourage research-based contributions to current debates on electronic communication design, applications, and policies; and * to suggest, by example, how studies of electronic communication can contribute

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Art & Culture vs Extremism in Arab World

Promoting culture is imperative for Arabs given the destruction of, and war on, culture launched by extremist and terrorist groups in the Middle East/North Africa region, said Sultan Al Qassemi.

“Every single member of our community in the Arab world has a responsibility and has the ability today, thanks to mobile phones, to document and save culture in case it disappears,” Al Qassemi, founder of the Barjeeel Art Foundation, told me.

2016-12-04-1480836529-8887207-SultanAlQassemiAbuFadil.jpg
Sultan Al Qassemi (Abu-Fadil)

And it’s not limited to elites, he insisted.

Al Qassemi was attending Kuwait-based Nuqat’s conference boosting innovation, promoting entrepreneurship, uncovering censorship, and serving as a teaching platform.

This year’s three-day conference was entitled “The Seventh Sense: Powering the Creative Economy.”

Al Qassemi spoke on the Arab world’s rich history in culture, and promoted the notion of cultural diplomacy, but admitted funding in general remained a hindrance to supporting the arts.

2016-12-04-1480836663-8446815-ScreenshotofBarjeelFoundationhomepage.jpg
Screen shot of Barjeel Foundation home page

He said Kuwait was a frontrunner in establishing art museums.

Al Qassemi, a noted patron of the arts from the United Arab Emirate of Sharjah where he set up his foundation, is a Renaissance man.

He is a columnist and commentator on Arab affairs whose articles have been published in the Guardian, CNN, The Independent, and Foreign Policy, and is a successful businessman to boot

But his passion is to save everything from lullabies to poetry, to music, to paintings and sculptures.

In his Nuqat presentation, Al Qassemi said challenges facing the creative economy in the Arab Gulf region included copyrights, the artist as master, and the lack of respect for intellectual property rights.

“Challenges facing the registration of intellectual property rights mean waiting at least a year to do so,” he noted, pointing to the high cost incurred by a creative person who has to register in each separate country.

Additionally, cyber crime laws are not properly developed to halt intellectual property right theft and there is no Arabic language website to handle the matter.

2016-12-04-1480836715-2574421-AlQassemionArabartandcultureAbuFadil.jpg
Al Qassemi on Arab art and culture (Abu-Fadil)

Another major hitch is the burden of social and religious censorship, the closure of exhibitions deemed too provocative in Arab Gulf countries, and petrified educational systems, said the outspoken Al Qassemi.

His foundation’s mission is to promote art by artists from the Arab world through local and international exhibitions.

Al Qassemi, who is also the co-director of the Dubai Global Art Forum that gathers artists, curators, musicians and writers to exchange and debate ideas on chosen themes, recently gave a talk at the Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt on the political undertones of iconic 20th Century artworks in the Arab world.

The subject: artworks as tools of soft power and propaganda by various Arab governments, including the Baathist regimes of Syria and Iraq, and the pan-Arabist government of Egypt’s Gamal Abdel Nasser, Ahram Online reported.

His talk coincided with the Barjeel Foundation’s opening of the Hurufiyya: Art and Identity exhibition on letterism.

2016-12-04-1480836818-2870093-Screenshotof22PoliticsinModernArabArt22poster.jpg
Screen shot of “Politics in Modern Arab Art” poster

The dynamic Al Qassemi rattled off a list of exhibitions to me that Barjeel was promoting from the end of 2016 through 2017, including the show in Alexandria, Egypt, as well as contemporary and modern art events in Tehran, Amman, Paris and Washington, DC.

I asked if Tehran wasn’t a sensitive topic given the tension between certain Arab countries and Iran, and the complicated geopolitics of the region.

His reply:
“Tehran is, and will remain forever, our neighbor. We here in the Gulf don’t have an issue with the Iranian people. We have a huge disagreement with the Iranian government. But it doesn’t mean that this should stand in the way of people-to-people, even commercial, exchange.”

Cultural exchange and tourism are probably among the most important things that bind people, he said.

“I think this helps to calm the atmosphere, even if governments disagree, so this is something that we have to keep in mind,” he explained.

The Nuqat conference was followed by four days of intensive workshops including designing and producing Arabic fonts using the Glyphs app, knowing one’s customer to improve one’s business, food in motion videography, Sadu-inspired product design from tapestries, boosting one’s employability in the creative industry, and creative problem solving skills in leadership.

2016-12-04-1480836923-5166173-TarekAtrissiexplainsthemechanicsoffontcreationAbuFadil.jpg
Tarek Atrissi explains the mechanics of font creation (Abu-Fadil)

Nuqat is a non-profit organization dedicated to the development of creativity in the Arab world.

I attended the first two workshops featuring Lebanese graphic design, typography, calligraphy and lettering expert Tarek Atrissi, and, Syrian entrepreneurship, design thinking and business management trainer Yara Al Adib.

“I’m interested in how typography becomes part of the visual language,” Atrissi said, adding that one can create compositions and visuals without resorting to pictures.

2016-12-04-1480836995-8428669-CreatingArabicfontsAbuFadil.jpg
Creating Arabic fonts (Abu-Fadil)

Atrissi said the Arab brand was becoming cool again and that common factors in the Arab world were language and change, with the complexity of culture in every aspect of design.

For Yara Al Adib, designers must know their customers to improve their businesses.

Unfortunately, many designers focus more on the creative side of their projects and neglect business requirements that keep them financially viable. Communicating about, and marketing, designers’ brands is almost an afterthought.

2016-12-04-1480837049-7912843-YaraAlAdibrighthelpstraineeswedcreativitywithentrepreneurshipAbuFadil.jpg
Yara Al Adib (right) helps trainees wed creativity, entrepreneurship (Abu-Fadil)

“You have to be relevant digitally, but customer service should not be digital,” Al Adib said of the need for the human touch.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Arts – The Huffington Post
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A Tribe Called Red Honors First Nations Culture With ‘Powwow Step’

Mix the beats you usually associate with dancehall or dubstep with a pulsing combination of spoken word and traditional tribal sounds and you have the essential formula for what could be considered a subgenre of EDM ― now being referred to as “powwow step.”

The primary purveyors of powwow step are the members of an indigenous DJ trio called A Tribe Called Red. Formed in 2008 in Ottawa, Canada, the group consists of Bear Witness, 2oolman and DJ NDN. Together, their complex musical identity rests on positivity ― “A Tribe Called Red promotes inclusivity, empathy and acceptance amongst all races and genders in the name of social justice,” the group writes online.

Speaking directly to indigenous communities “living in a country that was forcefully colonized,” ATCR believes that indigenous people must define their identity on their own terms. Their third album, “We Are the Halluci Nation,” echoes the sentiment in a time when protests in North Dakota are bringing the concerns of the Standing Rock Sioux reservation to the forefront of national news. “This album is critical listening for everyone,” Pitchfork declared earlier this year, praising the trio’s “iconoclastic” politics.

This week, ATCR is premiering the video for a single off the record, titled “The Virus.” Described as “a defiant celebration of indigenous and oppressed cultures,” the song features activist/poet/rapper Saul Williams and the First Nations drum group Chippewa Travellers

“We are the Halluci Nation,” a disembodied voice bellows over a rumbling drum swarm in the video above, reciting the words of Santee Dakota poet John Trudell. “We are the evolution. A continuation. We are the Halluci Nation. Our DNA is of earth and sky. Our DNA is of past and future.”

To accompany the premiere of “The Virus,” poet Williams sent The Huffington Post the following statement:

When the first question arose it took the form of a virus. The virus was a hallucinogen. Walking on water wasn’t built in a day. If plagiarism is a thing what do you call it on land? What does it mean to be true to your word? What does it mean to stand your ground? What does it mean to protect and serve? What does it mean when corporate interests encroach upon communal resources? What does it mean when we let the oligarchs of industry dig up the graves of First Nations to suck the blood beneath the bones and boil the profits in contaminated water?

We are the seventh generation. We are the protectors of this land, the protectors of water. We are not a conquered people. We will issue no warning. It will come thinly veiled or not veiled at all. The drum will beat. And you will hear it. There is no question.

Read about ATCR collaborator Tanya Tagaq on HuffPost Arts & Culture.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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A Guide to Finland’s Steamy Sauna Culture

One writer partakes in Finland’s oldest and most beloved tradition: A relaxing visit to the public sauna.
Allure
Jasmine Tookes accused of bleaching her skin on social media when a commenter posted on one of her Instagram videos featuring the Victoria’s Secret Fantasy Bra.
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Material Culture and Asian Religions

Material Culture and Asian Religions


Traditionally, research on the history of Asian religions has been marked by a bias for literary evidence, privileging canonical texts penned in ‘classical’ languages. Not only has a focus on literary evidence shaped the dominant narratives about the religious histories of Asia, in both scholarship and popular culture, but it has contributed to the tendency to study different religious traditions in relative isolation from one another. Today, moreover, historical work is often based on modern textual editions and, increasingly, on electronic databases. What may be lost, in the process, is the visceral sense of the text as artifact – as a material object that formed part of a broader material culture, in which the boundaries between religious traditions were sometimes more fluid than canonical literature might suggest. This volume brings together specialists in a variety of Asian cultures to discuss the methodological challenges involved in integrating material evidence for the reconstruction of the religious histories of South, Southeast, Central, and East Asia. By means of specific ‘test cases,’ the volume explores the importance of considering material and literary evidence in concert. What untold stories do these sources help us to recover? How might they push us to reevaluate historical narratives traditionally told from literary sources? By addressing these questions from the perspectives of different subfields and religious traditions, contributors map out the challenges involved in interpreting different types of data, assessing the problems of interpretation distinct to specific types of material evidence (e.g, coins, temple art, manuscripts, donative inscriptions) and considering the issues raised by the different patterns in the preservation of such evidence in different locales. Special attention is paid to newly-discovered and neglected sources; to our evidence for trade, migration, and inter-regional cultural exchange; and to geographical locales tha

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Shoes speak louder – T Culture – Women’s T-Shirt

Shoes speak louder – T Culture – Women’s T-Shirt


Women’s T-Shirt – Shoes speak louder than words. Great slogan tee by T Culture. – This relaxed fit classic offers plenty of room and is ideal for most body types. Perfect as an outer or under layer, this versatile t-shirt is a must-have for all wardrobes. 100% preshrunk cotton (deep heather color is 50% cotton/50% polyester and heather gray is 90% cotton/10% polyester) Fabric Weight: 5.4 oz (heavyweight) Double-stitched seams at shoulder, sleeve, collar and waist Durable and reliable Available in a wide variety of colors Imported; processed and printed in the U.S.A. + + + With hundreds of designs – Spreadshirt – is the online destination for your favorite tees. Many of our designs are available in mens, womens, youth, kids and baby sizes and come in a variety of different colors. Check our Rakuten store to see them all!

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Exploring Psychedelic Trance and Electronic Dance Music in Modern Culture

Exploring Psychedelic Trance and Electronic Dance Music in Modern Culture


The popularization and cult-like following of electronic music has provoked new relations between men and machines, art and technology, and modern shamans and disc jockeys. New technologies and multimedia tools have awakened neo-ritual practices through the emergence of Psychedelic Trance parties, evoking tribal experiences inspired by a new shamanism, mediated by high-tech guide elements. Exploring Psychedelic Trance and Electronic Dance Music in Modern Culture investigates the expansive scope of Electronic Music Dance Culture (EMDC), the rise of Psychedelic Trance culture, and their relationship with new digital platforms. Drawing from perspectives in sociology, anthropology, psychology, aesthetics and the arts, religious studies, information technologies, multimedia communication, shamanism, and ritualism, this book analyzes the impact of new technologies on individual and collective behaviors in cyberspace. This innovative reference source is ideal for use by academicians, researchers, upper-level students, practitioners, and theorists. Focusing on a variety of topics relating to sub-cultures, human behavior, and popular culture, this title features timely research on alternative culture, electronic music festivals, ethnography, music and religion, psychedelic drugs, Psytrance, rave culture, and trance parties.

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On-Demand Culture: Digital Delivery and the Future of Movies

On-Demand Culture: Digital Delivery and the Future of Movies


Paperback, Rutgers Univ Pr, 2013, ISBN13 9780813561097, ISBN10 0813561094

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The Culture of the Europeans (Text Only Edition)

The Culture of the Europeans (Text Only Edition)


A magisterial narrative account of the creation and consumption of all forms of ‘culture’ across the European continent over the last two hundred years. This compelling, wide-ranging and hugely ambitious book offers, for the first time ever, an integrated history of the culture produced and consumed by Europeans since 1800, and follows its transformation from an elite activity to a mass market – from lending libraries to the internet, from the first public concerts to music downloads. In itself a cultural tour de force, the book covers high and low culture, readers and writers, audiences and prima donnas, Rossini and hip hop, Verdi and the Beatles, Zola and Tintin, Walter Scott and Jules Verne, the serialised novel of the 19th-century as well as ‘Dallas’ and ‘Coronation Street’. Included in its vast scope are fairytales, bestsellers, crime and sci-fi, non-fiction, magazines, newspapers, comic strips, plays, opera, musicals, pop music, sound recording, films, documentaries, radio and television. A continent-wide survey, this majestic work includes discussions of rock music under communism, Polish and Danish bestsellers, French melodramas and German cabarets, fascist and Soviet cinema. It examines the ways culture travels – how it is produced, transformed, adapted, absorbed, sold and consumed; how it is shaped by audiences and politics, and controlled by laws and conventional morality; why some countries excel in particular genres. It examines the anxiety and attraction felt by Europeans towards American culture, and asks to what extent European culture has become Americanised. Stylishly written, devoid of jargon, this is global non-fiction narrative at its best. Note that it has not been possible to include the same picture content that appeared in the original print version.

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Popular Music in Evangelical Youth Culture

Popular Music in Evangelical Youth Culture


Christian churches and groups within Anglo-American contexts have increasingly used popular music as a way to connect with young people. This book investigates the relationships between evangelical Christianity and popular music, focusing particularly on electronic dance music in the last twenty years. Author Stella Lau illustrates how electronic dance music is legitimized in evangelical activities by Christians’ discourses, and how the discourses challenge the divide between the ‘secular’ and the ‘sacred’ in the Western culture. Unlike other existing books on the relationships between music cultures and religion, which predominantly discuss the cultural implications of such phenomenon, Popular Music in Evangelical Youth Culture examines the notion of ‘spirituality’ in contemporary popular electronic dance music. Lau’s emphasis on the sonic qualities of electronic dance music opens the door for future research about the relationships between aural properties of electronic dance music and religious discourses. With three case studies conducted in the cultural hubs of electronic dance music – Bristol, Ibiza and New York – the monograph can also be used as a guidebook for ethnographic research in popular music.

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A History of Evil in Popular Culture: What Hannibal Lecter, Stephen King, and Vampires Reveal About America [2 volumes]

A History of Evil in Popular Culture: What Hannibal Lecter, Stephen King, and Vampires Reveal About America [2 volumes]


Evil isn’t simply an abstract theological or philosophical talking point. In our society, the idea of evil feeds entertainment, manifests in all sorts of media, and is a root concept in our collective psyche. This accessible and appealing book examines what evil means to us. Includes the insights of scholars from widely different academic fields to inspect evil from various points of view, giving readers a broader perspective on the topic Compiles expert opinions from American, American expatriate, European, Asian, and Middle Eastern contributors Covers the portrayal of evil in many different forms of media-film, television, music, art, video games, literature, poetry-as well as in politics, current events, and the legal arena

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William Cobbett and Rural Popular Culture

William Cobbett and Rural Popular Culture


This is the first rural and cultural study of the great English countryman William Cobbett (1763-1835). It binds Cobbett’s radical career to his rural heritage and to the experiences and politics of agricultural workers during the early nineteenth century. As a radical, Cobbett’s first quest was to represent the hardships of the labouring poor, and he adopted the labourers’ cultural experiences and class consciousness as the basis of his political platform. He revolutionized press history by joining the ‘pedlar’s pack’, from where he dispensed his two-penny broadsheets along with other varieties of popular literature. The rural labourers understood Cobbett because he articulated their beliefs and values as expressed in their own folksongs and broadside ballads. They embraced Cobbett as a radical leader and as an educator, heeding his moral instruction, his treatises on cottage economy, and his prescriptions on the recovery of Old England. Cobbett lived and moved among the labourers, and knew their political or economic grievances; thus long before the ‘Captain Swing’ rising he forecast the date and patterns of the revolt. His predictions came to pass and he became the single most important leader of the insurrection. His position of authority in the villages carried him forward in the cause of the Great Reform Bill and the Old Poor Law, so that by the end of his eventful career he was the sole public exponent of the cottage charter. This is a major and original work on Cobbett, and represents a breakthrough in the study of rural popular culture and in Cobbett scholarship. It will appeal strongly to a wide range of social and political historians, and have much value for all those interested in the language of class, the evolution of the English language, and the history of journalism.
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Zombies, Vampires, and Philosophy: New Life for the Undead (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

Zombies, Vampires, and Philosophy: New Life for the Undead (Popular Culture and Philosophy)


Since 1968’s Night of the Living Dead, zombie culture has steadily limped and clawed its way into the center of popular culture. Today, zombies and vampires have taken over TV shows, comic books, cartoons, video games, and movies. Zombies, Vampires, and Philosophy drags the theories of famous philosophers like Socrates and Descartes into the territory of the undead, exploring questions like: Why do vampires and vegetarians share a similar worldview? Why is understanding zombies the key to health care reform? And what does “healthy in mind and body” mean for vampires and zombies? Answers to these questions and more await readers brave enough to make this fun, philosophical foray into the undead.
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Gym Culture Meets Planet Earth in This Pretty-Accurate Parody Video

Like antelopes at the watering hole.

Lifestyle – Esquire

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When Do Kids Learn ‘Fairness’? Culture May Matter, Study Finds

Experiment sheds light on how children in different countries react to being given more than their peers
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Reading Beyond the Book: The Social Practices of Contemporary Literary Culture

Reading Beyond the Book: The Social Practices of Contemporary Literary Culture


Literary culture has become a form of popular culture over the last fifteen years thanks to the success of televised book clubs, film adaptations, big-box book stores, online bookselling, and face-to-face and online book groups. This volume offers the first critical analysis of mass reading events and the contemporary meanings of reading in the UK, USA, and Canada based on original interviews and surveys with readers and event organizers.

The resurgence of book groups has inspired new cultural formations of what the authors call “shared reading.” They interrogate the enduring attraction of an old technology for readers, community organizers, and government agencies, exploring the social practices inspired by the sharing of books in public spaces and revealing the complex ideological investments made by readers, cultural workers, institutions, and the mass media in the meanings of reading.


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California Launches Effort Promoting Art and Culture Districts

Last week, Governor Jerry Brown signed into law Assembly Bill 189 , a measure empowering the California Arts Council to designate areas as Cultural Districts in a competitive application process.

Craig Watson, Director of the California Arts Council said, “The signing of AB 189, is great news for communities of all sizes, all across our state … (we will) play a central role in strengthening local communities through economic growth, increased tourism, and community cohesion. The resources we expect to bring together on a statewide level will strengthen existing districts and foster the development of new cultural hubs.”

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Governor Brown, Craig Watson, and of course, Assemblyman Richard Bloom (D-Santa Monica) who introduced AB 189, all undoubtedly see the connections between the arts and creativity and, in turn, between creativity and innovation and want California to continue to lead the nation in the development of theatrical films, television, cable and Internet programs, video games, high tech hardware and software goods and services which are the heart and soul of the new economy.

AB 189 charges the Council to formulate a plan to foster Art Districts throughout the state, thereby enhancing creativity, and in the process,reinventing the landscape of cities throughout the state. The Council, always looking at ways to enhance creativity in the schools and almost everywhere art is displayed, has now joined the movement to change communities too. They will, according to the legislation, “provide technical and promotional support to the districts, as well as collaborate with public agencies and private entities to maximize the benefits to the local and state economy.”

To date, 15 states have taken on a formalized State role in the creation of art and cultural districts. Together, they are leading the effort to transform America for the rapidly evolving creative economy.

According to the National Assembly of State Art Agencies, such “districts are special areas designated or certified by state governments, that utilize cultural resources to encourage economic development and foster synergies between the arts and other businesses. State cultural districts have evolved into focal points that feature many types of businesses, foster a high quality of life for residents, attract tourism and engender civic pride.”

Arts districts, usually found on the periphery of a city center, are intended to create a critical mass of art galleries, dance clubs, theaters, art cinemas, music venues, and public squares for performances. Often, such places also attract cafes, restaurants and retail shops.

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More and more however, cities are thinking about such districts as a way to insure the city attracts, nurtures and retains the creative workforce it needs to succeed in the new economy, an economy vitally dependent on creativity and innovation. As important as reinventing our systems of education, communities where people young and old spend more than half their day living and working, aspiring art and culture districts are essential to establishing vibrant and productive communities. Indeed, these places are the incubators of creativity.

Art and Culture Districts, says Theresa Cameron, formerly Local Arts Agency Services Program Manager of Americans for the Arts (AFTA), “have the potential — with their critical mass of art galleries, cinemas, music venues, public squares for performances, restaurants, cafes and retail shops — of attracting, and nurturing the creative workforce our cities need to succeed in the new economy.” Recently AFTA has created a website devoted to the “who, what and why” these districts are so important.

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As the geographical landscape of a city morphs into a larger metropolitan region–partly because of population growth, mostly out of economic necessity — what we call downtown becomes even more critical to the wealth and well-being of the people living in those communities. Few efforts to insure America’s success and survival in the new economy could be more important.

Arkansas, Colorado, Kentucky and Massachusetts are the most recent state agencies to establish such an initiative. Eight other states recognized such districts as tax free enterprises and have adopted similar efforts. The appointees to Art Councils, usually loyal friends of the elected Governor, don’t often take on issues of local economic development. But this seems to be changing, as many appointees are visionary leaders, action oriented, and making their voices heard.

States use a variety of tax incentives to encourage business development within local cultural districts. Examples of state incentives include sales, income, or property tax credits or exemptions for goods produced or sold within the district; or preservation tax credits for historic property renovations and rehabilitation. Maybe a state will offer an amusement or admission tax waiver for events within the district. All the plans vary and the funding is uniquely packaged to insure sustainability.

The “State Cultural District” designation from the Art Council seems to be enough for cities to apply, but you have to wonder what cities could do and whether smaller cities might apply if a little financial help were forthcoming. You have to wonder too, what might be possible if more organizations, chambers of commerce, economic development agencies and high tech companies in a region joined forces to help in the reinvention effort.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Arts – The Huffington Post
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Consumption, Media And Culture In South Africa: Perspectives On Freedom And The Public

Consumption, Media And Culture In South Africa: Perspectives On Freedom And The Public


This book is the first of its kind to bring together a collection of critical scholarly work on consumer culture in South Africa, exploring the cultural, political, economic, and social aspects of consumption in post-Apartheid society.From sushi and Japanese diplomacy to Queen Sophie''s writhing gown, from middle class Sowetan golfers to an indebted working class citizenry, from wedding websites to wedding nostalgia, from the liberation of consuming to the low wage labour of selling, the chapters in this book demonstrate a variety of themes, showing that to start with consumption, rather than ending with it, allows for new insights into long-standing areas of social research. By mapping, exploring and theorizing the diverse aspects of consumption and consumer culture, the volume collectively works towards a fresh set of empirically rooted conceptual commentaries on the politics, economics, and social dynamics of modern South Africa. This effort, in turn, can serve as a foundation for thinking less parochially about neoliberal power and consumer culture.On a global scale, studying consumption in South Africa matters because in some ways the country serves as a microcosm for global patterns of income inequality, race-based economic oppression, and hopes for the material betterment of life. By exploring what consumption means on the ''local'' scale in South Africa, the possibility arises to trace new global links and dissonances. This book was originally published as a special issue ofCritical Arts.
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End-of-Summer Pop Culture Sensations to Try Before Labor Day

Chances are that right now, your life involves a lot of between-season fashion quandaries (try finding a swimsuit for a late-August vacation right now—just try) and out-of-office auto responses. But against the sluggish end-of-summer odds,…


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Asian Popular Culture: New, Hybrid, and Alternate Media

Asian Popular Culture: New, Hybrid, and Alternate Media


New – Asian Popular Culture: New, Hybrid, and Alternate Media, edited by John A. Lent and Lorna Fitzsimmons, is an interdisciplinary study of popular culture practices in Asia, including regional and national studies of Japan, China, South Korea, and Australia. The contributors explore the evolution and intersection of popular forms (gaming, manga, anime, film, music, fiction, YouTube videos) and explicate the changing cultural meanings of these media in historical and contemporary contexts. At

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Reinterpreting Modern Culture: An Introduction to Friedrich Nietzsche’s Philosophy (Purdue University Press Series in the History of Philosophy)

Reinterpreting Modern Culture: An Introduction to Friedrich Nietzsche’s Philosophy (Purdue University Press Series in the History of Philosophy)


New – Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) presents himself several times as a physician of culture. He considers it his task to make a diagnosis of the culture of his age, to point to the latent or patent diseases, but also to the possibilities to overcome them. His diagnosis, prognosis, and prescriptions implied an overcoming of traditional interpretation of what is going on in the main domains of culture: knowledge, morality, religion, and art. This book presents Nietzsche’s thoughts on knowledge

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Ministers of Culture Visit Fondazione Prada

CULTURAL FIELD TRIP: On the occasion of the International Conference of Ministers of Culture, more than 150 guests, including ministers and ambassadors of 66 countries participating in the expo, visited the headquarters of Fondazione Prada in Milan on Friday.
The conference, entitled “Cultural Instruments of Dialogues among People,” was commissioned by the Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and is held at the Auditorium Expo 1 on Friday and Saturday.
To kickstart the conference, participants including Dario Franceschini, minister of heritage, cultural activities and tourism and Irina Bokova, general director of Unesco, visited the 204,514-square-foot art space, which currently exhibits “Serial Classic” by curator Salvatore Settis. The visitors were guided by designer and president of the foundation Miuccia Prada, architect Rem Koolhaas and Germano Celant, scientific and artistic superintendent of the foundation.

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Fashion, Culture and Identity By Fred Davis (Paperback)

Fashion, Culture and Identity By Fred Davis (Paperback)


Overview What do our clothes say about who we are or who we think we are? How does the way we dress communicate messages about our identity? Is the desire to be “in fashion” universal, or is it unique to Western culture? How do fashions change? These are just a few of the intriguing questions Fred Davis sets out to answer in this provocative look at what we do with our clothes and what they can do to us. Much of what we assume to be individual preference, Davis shows, really reflects deeper social and cultural forces. Ours is an ambivalent social world, characterized by tensions over gender roles, social status, and the expression of sexuality. Predicting what people will wear becomes a risky gamble when the link between private self and public persona can be so unstable. Product details Isbn-13: 9780226138091, 978-0226138091 Author: Fred Davis Publisher: The University of Chicago Press Publication date: 1994-06-01 About Wordery Wordery is one of the UK’s largest online booksellers. With millions of satisfied customers who enjoy low prices on a huge range of books, we offer a reliable and trusted service and consistently receive excellent feedback. We offer a huge range of over 8 million books; bestsellers, children’s books, cheap paperbacks, baby books, special edition hardbacks and textbooks. All our books are dispatched from the UK. Wordery offers Free Delivery on all UK orders, and competitively priced international delivery. #HappyReading

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Pop Culture Highs And Lows Of 2015 Thus Far

We were pretty bored around the midway point last year, but 2015 has given us more than enough to celebrate (and condemn). It’s been a wild six months, and pop culture is no exception. Our list of the peaks and troughs ranges from a heroic coming out and a record-smashing TV debut to an embattled comedian who just won’t go away and a divorce that leaves our hearts gone, baby, gone.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Arts – The Huffington Post
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William Cobbett And Rural Popular Culture

William Cobbett And Rural Popular Culture


This is the first rural and cultural study of the great English countryman William Cobbett (1763-1835). It binds Cobbett''s radical career to his rural heritage and to the experiences and politics of agricultural workers during the early nineteenth century. As a radical, Cobbett''s first quest was to represent the hardships of the labouring poor, and he adopted the labourers'' cultural experiences and class consciousness as the basis of his political platform. He revolutionized press history by joining the ''pedlar''s pack'', from where he dispensed his two-penny broadsheets along with other varieties of popular literature. The rural labourers understood Cobbett because he articulated their beliefs and values as expressed in their own folksongs and broadside ballads. They embraced Cobbett as a radical leader and as an educator, heeding his moral instruction, his treatises on cottage economy, and his prescriptions on the recovery of Old England. Cobbett lived and moved among the labourers, and knew their political or economic grievances; thus long before the ''Captain Swing'' rising he forecast the date and patterns of the revolt. His predictions came to pass and he became the single most important leader of the insurrection. His position of authority in the villages carried him forward in the cause of the Great Reform Bill and the Old Poor Law, so that by the end of his eventful career he was the sole public exponent of the cottage charter. This is a major and original work on Cobbett, and represents a breakthrough in the study of rural popular culture and in Cobbett scholarship. It will appeal strongly to a wide range of social and political historians, and have much value for all those interested in the language of class, the evolution of the English language, and the history of journalism.
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William Cobbett and Rural Popular Culture: WILLIAM COBBETT & RURAL POPULA

William Cobbett and Rural Popular Culture: WILLIAM COBBETT & RURAL POPULA


This is the first rural and cultural study of the great English countryman William Cobbett (1763-1835). It binds Cobbett''s radical career to his rural heritage and to the experiences and politics of agricultural workers during the early nineteenth century. As a radical, Cobbett''s first quest was to represent the hardships of the labouring poor, and he adopted the labourers'' cultural experiences and class consciousness as the basis of his political platform. He revolutionized press history by joining the ''pedlar''s pack'', from where he dispensed his two-penny broadsheets along with other varieties of popular literature. The rural labourers understood Cobbett because he articulated their beliefs and values as expressed in their own folksongs and broadside ballads. They embraced Cobbett as a radical leader and as an educator, heeding his moral instruction, his treatises on cottage economy, and his prescriptions on the recovery of Old England. Cobbett lived and moved among the labourers, and knew their political or economic grievances; thus long before the ''Captain Swing'' rising he forecast the date and patterns of the revolt. His predictions came to pass and he became the single most important leader of the insurrection. His position of authority in the villages carried him forward in the cause of the Great Reform Bill and the Old Poor Law, so that by the end of his eventful career he was the sole public exponent of the cottage charter. This is a major and original work on Cobbett, and represents a breakthrough in the study of rural popular culture and in Cobbett scholarship. It will appeal strongly to a wide range of social and political historians, and have much value for all those interested in the language of class, the evolution of the English language, and the history of journalism.
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Children, Technology and Culture

Children, Technology and Culture


Childhood is increasingly saturated by technology: from television to the Internet, video games to ‘video nasties’, camcorders to personal computers. Children, Technology and Culture looks at the interplay of children and technology which poses critical questions for how we understand the nature of childhood in late modern society. This collection brings together researchers from a range of disciplines to address the following four aspects of this relationship between children and technology: *children’s access to technologies and the implications for social relationships *the structural contexts of children’s engagement with technologies with a focus on gender and the family *the situatedness of children’s interactions with technological objects *the constitution of children and childhood through the mediations of technology This book represents a substantial contribution to contemporary social scientific thinking both about the nature of children and childhood, the social impacts of technologies and the various relationships between the two.

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Namibia – Culture Smart!

Namibia – Culture Smart!


Culture Smart! provides essential information on attitudes, beliefs and behavior in different countries, ensuring that you arrive at your destination aware of basic manners, common courtesies, and sensitive issues. These concise guides tell you what to expect, how to behave, and how to establish a rapport with your hosts. This inside knowledge will enable you to steer clear of embarrassing gaffes and mistakes, feel confident in unfamiliar situations, and develop trust, friendships, and successful business relationships. Culture Smart! offers illuminating insights into the culture and society of a particular country. It will help you to turn your visit-whether on business or for pleasure-into a memorable and enriching experience. Contents include:* customs, values, and traditions* historical, religious, and political background* life at home* leisure, social, and cultural life* eating and drinking* dos, don’ts, and taboos* business practices* communication, spoken and unspoken”Culture Smart has come to the rescue of hapless travellers.” Sunday Times Travel”. the perfect introduction to the weird, wonderful and downright odd quirks and customs of various countries.” Global Travel”.full of fascinating-as well as common-sense-tips to help you avoid embarrassing faux pas.” Observer”.as useful as they are entertaining.” Easyjet Magazine”.offer glimpses into the psyche of a faraway world.” New York Times

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Yogurt Culture: A Global Look at How to Make, Bake, Sip, and Chill the World’s Creamiest, Healthiest Food

Yogurt Culture: A Global Look at How to Make, Bake, Sip, and Chill the World’s Creamiest, Healthiest Food


Collects over one hundred flavorful recipes for each meal of the day using yogurt as an ingredient, including tomato, avocado, and cucumber salad, challah French toast, creamy beef curry, and goat cheese cheesecake.

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Reflections on Five Years of Blogging on HuffPost Arts & Culture

The past few weeks have been busy, so an important career milestone almost slipped by with my having noticed: May 13th was my “Five Year Blogaversary.” On that date in 2010 my first blog appeared on The Huffington Post. Titled “Picasso’s Recession-Proof Harem,” it appeared on HuffPost’s New York section, as the Arts page hadn’t opened yet. HuffPost Arts — now HuffPost Arts & Culture — officially opened a month later, on June 15, 2010, under the direction of its amazing founding editor, artist Kimberly Brooks.

“Picasso’s Recession-Proof Harem” was the first of a total of 259 blogs (this one included) that I have posted over a five-year span. That means I have averaged just under a blog a week over time. When I started, I had absolutely no idea that I was capable of writing so much or so often. Blogging has been a huge surprise for me: It has been a life-transforming experience and a door-opener.

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Ex-voto painting by Matthew Couper

Matthew Couper’s wonderful ex-voto painting, sent to me as a gift early in 2011, does a great job of capturing the spirit world of my newfound avocation. Seated productively at my computer, I’m connected by a grid of red circuitry to Mat Gleason — another early HuffPost Arts blogger — and also to an all-seeing eye, and to a painting by my mentor, the late Nathan Oliveira. A head by Jean-Michel Basquiat — another art world frenemy — rises over the floor tiles to my left, while my journalistic patron saintess, Arianna Huffington, raises a knowing eyebrow to my right. Christ, crucified for art, adds an additional touch of religiosity and devotion to the tableau.

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At work in my office

Matthew’s painting captures some of the imaginative and psychological forces that surround my interest in writing. A photo of me at work in my real office shows some interesting correspondences. I do spend a great deal of time leaning over my laptop, and a work by Nathan Oliveira — one of his “Tauromaquia” monotypes — does hang in front of me as I write. A large model plane that I built and put too much work into to actually fly hangs over my head, a reminder of a hobby of the past. The energy that I used to put into making things seems to all go into writing these days. After recently re-organizing a bookshelf in my office to contain all of the catalogs and books I have contributed to over the past few years, all the effort suddenly seemed tangible.

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Art catalogs and books

The following list contains some reflections, notes and comments from five years of blogging:

A few things I have learned:

Every word matters. You never know who is reading your blog. Every blog is important.

My favorite quote from an artist:

“The bravest thing in the world is to take a position without a pre-planned fall back.”

– Kyle Staver quoted in “A Brother Honored”

My favorite reader comment:

“Read it. Excellent. Loved the Mao.”

Steve Martin responding to my blog “I Don’t Deconstruct” on Twitter.

Blogging is different from other kinds of writing:

You wake up in the morning, drink your coffee, and blog about what you want to write about in the way that you want to.

Blogging is truly social:

I have never had so many friends. Oh, and a few frenemies too…

Something I need to do again:

The “Paintings and Palettes” and “Studio Visit” blogs were a lot of work, but a lot of fun too.

Click here for one…

A common misconception.

I have written predominantly about representational painters. For that reason, some people have come to think that I don’t care for other types of art. That isn’t true. I write about representational painting because there is simply so much good work out there that hasn’t gotten the attention that it deserves.

Humor is important:

You can say things with humor that you can’t say another other way. A list of my satires can be found at this link.

I’m often asked if I have a favorite artist:

Yes, it is the artist I am writing about at any given moment.

Artists need to have their stories told:

Interviewing artists has allowed me let artists tell their stories. An index of the 75 interviews I have conducted since 2010 can be found on my personal website.

http://www.johnseed.com/p/interviews.html

Some Acknowledgements:

I owe a great deal of thanks to Arianna Huffington, Kimberly Brooks, Kathleen Massara and Katherine Brooks (my editors). I owe even more to my wife Linda who has supported me, even when I have been writing when there is laundry that needs folding.

To my readers:

Thank you for reading. There is a lot left to write… more blogs are on the way.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Arts – The Huffington Post
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Polynesian Seafaring and Navigation: Ocean Travel in Anutan Culture and Society

Polynesian Seafaring and Navigation: Ocean Travel in Anutan Culture and Society


Without seafaring canoes, deep-sea sailing skills, and the ability to navigate by naked-eye observations of the stars and sea and bird life, there would have been no Polynesian people as we know them today. These islanders are as much a creation of their voyaging technology as they were creators of it. Had they and their ancestors not developed this technology and associated sailing and navigational skills, the ancestral Polynesians could never have ventured out into the middle of the pacific to find and settle so many islands and thereby develop into a sizable and culturally distinct people. There are a few out-of-the-way Polynesian islands where some facets of the old maritime tradition apparently survive today. One such island is Anuta, a tiny volcanic island which, though located within the Solomon Islands of Melanesia, is populated by Polynesians. Because of the small size of the island, its remoteness, and its lack of commercially viable resources, Anutans there still live close to the traditional pattern of their ancestors. They make and sail their canoes in more or less the same way that their ancestors did, and the sea so pervades their lives that much can be learned of the way Polynesians have adapted to their oceanic environment by looking at how Anutans interact with the sea. from the Foreword by Ben Finney, Professor of Anthropology, University of Hawaii. After fourteen months of field research in 1972-73 and an additional four months of field work with Anutans in the Solomon Islands capital of Honiara in 1983, Richard Feinberg here provides a thorough study of Anutan seafaring and navigation. In doing so, he gives rare insights into the larger picture of how Polynesians have adapted to the sea. This richly illustrated book explores the theory and technique used by Anutans in construction, use, and handling of their craft; the navigational skills still employed in interisland voyaging; and their culturally patterned attitudes toward the ocean and travel

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Libya – Culture Smart!

Libya – Culture Smart!


Culture Smart! provides essential information on attitudes, beliefs and behavior in different countries, ensuring that you arrive at your destination aware of basic manners, common courtesies, and sensitive issues. These concise guides tell you what to expect, how to behave, and how to establish a rapport with your hosts. This inside knowledge will enable you to steer clear of embarrassing gaffes and mistakes, feel confident in unfamiliar situations, and develop trust, friendships, and successful business relationships. Culture Smart! offers illuminating insights into the culture and society of a particular country. It will help you to turn your visit-whether on business or for pleasure-into a memorable and enriching experience. Contents include* customs, values, and traditions* historical, religious, and political background* life at home* leisure, social, and cultural life* eating and drinking* dos, don’ts, and taboos* business practices* communication, spoken and unspoken”Culture Smart has come to the rescue of hapless travellers.” Sunday Times Travel”. the perfect introduction to the weird, wonderful and downright odd quirks and customs of various countries.” Global Travel”.full of fascinating-as well as common-sense-tips to help you avoid embarrassing faux pas.” Observer”.as useful as they are entertaining.” Easyjet Magazine”.offer glimpses into the psyche of a faraway world.” New York Times

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Writing Egypt: History, Literature and Culture

Writing Egypt: History, Literature and Culture


The American University in Cairo Press, founded in 1960, celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2010. In half a century, the Press has grown from producing one or two books a year in the 1960s to its position today as the leading English-language publisher of the Middle East, with an annual
publication program of up to 100 new books, and a backlist catalog offering of over 1,000 publications.

To celebrate 50 years of excellence in publishing, Aleya Serour has drawn together extracts from some of the milestones among the fertile and diverse output of the AUC Press over five decades. Here is history, from Kent Weeks on ancient Thebes to Galal Amin on modern Egyptian society; culture, from
Bernard O''Kane on early Mamluk decorative arts to Azza Fahmy on jewelry for spirit appeasement; and the best of Arabic literature in translation, from Taha Hussein and Naguib Mahfouz to Alaa Al Aswany and Ahmed Alaidy. . . . And much more, giving a rounded picture of the cultural contribution of one
of the major players in Middle East publishing.
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History: Politics or Culture? Reflections on Ranke and Burckhardt

History: Politics or Culture? Reflections on Ranke and Burckhardt


Leopold von Ranke (1795-1886), generally recognized as the founder of the school of modern critical historical scholarship, and Jacob Burckhardt (1818-1897), the great Swiss proponent of cultural interpretation, are fathers of modern history-giants of their time who continue to exert an immense influence in our own. They are usually seen as contrasts, Ranke as representative of political history and Burckhardt of cultural history. In five essays, each flowing gracefully into the next, the distinguished historian Felix Gilbert shows that such contrasts are oversimplifications. Despite their interest in different aspects of the past, Ranke’s and Burckhardt’s views arose from common elements in the first half of the nineteenth century, the time in which they grew up and in which their first masterworks attracted such wide attention. This concise volume clarifies the beginnings of history as an autonomous discipline, while forcing us to examine our views on basic questions in historical scholarship. In the case of Ranke, relating his work to his times counteracts the current tendency to disregard the difference between the historical concepts of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. By focusing on this difference, Gilbert emphasizes the originality and novelty of Ranke’s ideas about history. Although Burckhardt is often portrayed as an intellectually lonely figure, this book reveals the importance of relating his thought to the intellectual trends of his time. Originally published in 1990.The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University P

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Yemen Women in Culture, Business & Travel

Yemen Women in Culture, Business & Travel


Women often occupy different roles in a foreign culture. Avoid offensive assumptions and behavior by understanding the position of women in Yemeni society: their legal rights; access to education and health care; workforce participation; and their dating, marriage, and family life.
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The 7 Famous Hats That Rocked Pop Culture

Hats are an under-appreciated accessory (unless you’re Kate Middleton, in which case they’re constantly celebrated). While they might not get a lot of shelf space in our own closets, they’ve commanded our collective attention plenty when it comes to pop culture, celebrity, and news moments.

jackie-kennedy-pillbox-hat
First Jackie Kennedy’s most iconic item? Easily the pillbox hat.

blossom-tv-show-hat
You’re not alone if your elementary school self had a fascination with floppy, flower-topped crusher hats. Credit goes to Mayim Bialik, who made the accessory all her own on Blossom.

monica-lewinsky-beret-hat
The most talked-about beret—ever—belonged to Monica Lewinsky.

stacey-dash-black-red-hat-clueless
Clueless had multiple hat moments, but top prize goes to Stacey Dash’s Dion, who brought it with bold colors and big shapes.

princess-beatrice-hat-kate-middleton-wedding
When Kate Middleton and Prince William got married, hats were everywhere. None received as much commentary as the one Princess Beatrice chose, which elicited comparisons to a certain part of the female anatomy.

pharrell-williams-grammys
Never has a hat been such a red carpet conversation-starter as the Vivienne Westwood number Pharrell chose for last year’s Grammys.

breaking-bad-walter-white-hat
The hat that caused the most recent buzz on TV belonged to Breaking Bad‘s Walter White, whose drug lord self depended on it for a full transformation from chem teacher.





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Zambia Women in Culture, Business & Travel

Zambia Women in Culture, Business & Travel


Women often occupy different roles in a foreign culture. Avoid offensive assumptions and behavior by understanding the position of women in Zambian society: their legal rights; access to education and health care; workforce participation; and their dating, marriage, and family life.
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Comic Book Culture

Comic Book Culture


What are super-devoted fans of comic books really like? What draws them together and energizes their zeal? What do the denizens of this pop-culture world have in common’this book provides good answers as it scrutinizes the fans whose profiles can be traced at their conventions, in pages of fanzines, on websites, in chat-rooms, on electronic bulletin boards, and before the racks in comic-book stores. They are a singular breed, and an absorbing interest in comic books (sometimes life-consuming) unites them. Studies have shows that the clustering, die-hard disciples of Star Trek have produced a unique culture. The same can be said of American enthusiasts of comic books. These aficionados range from the stereotypical fanboy who revels in the minute details of mainstream superhero titles like X-Men to the more discriminating (and downright snobbish) reader of idiosyncratic alternative comics like Eightball. Literate comics like Watchman, Radioactiv

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Initiatives in Art and Culture Hosting Annual Gold Conference

STAY GOLDEN: The Initiatives in Art and Culture will hold its fifth annual Gold Conference on Thursday, with a two-day schedule of conversations, panels and presentations. This year, the conference’s events will adhere to the official theme, “Gold: Transparency, Trends and Techniques.” “We have been overwhelmed by the fascinating recent developments in the gold industry, as we have been and continue to be with the history and legacy of this precious metal,” said IAC founder Lisa Koenigsberg of the theme. Topics that will be discussed over the conference’s many panels include “Designing for Millennials,” “Cutting Edge Technology and Its Potential,” Gold in Beauty: Body Adornment,” and “Jewelry Trends Driven by the Catwalk.” Speakers include Ana Khouri, Anita Ko and Daniel Brush. Sessions will take place at the City University of New York’s Graduate Center. The IAC will also host two cocktail events: a reception at the Aaron Faber Gallery on Thursday night to celebrate the gallery’s 40th anniversary, and a closing reception on Friday night held at Doyle & Doyle’s flagship store in the Meatpacking District.

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Racial Healing, Scandal and Popular Culture

“The stories we tell each other, the gossip we pass, and the media representation of events shape the meaning of our lives.” – -Rachel Godsil, Brianna Goodale, Perception Institute

The story of the brutal and untimely death of civil rights activist Jimmie Lee Jackson of Marion, Alabama, has been referenced in speeches, history books and news articles since that tragic day in 1965. But, when stories are told by a member of that community as in Ava DuVernay’s Selma film portrayal, the power of those authentic stories can touch hearts, open minds, mobilize masses and create opportunities for healing.

In the past two years, some of our nation’s most influential movies and television shows have dealt with racism and bias. From Fruitvale Station to Selma, Scandal to House of Cards, celebrated writers, actors and directors have brought these issues to the mainstream. This has all been accompanied by a drumbeat crescendo of news and analysis that goes beyond specific incidents to examine the roots of these issues and the trends that reinforce them.

For those of us who work for racial equity and healing each day, this is an encouraging trend and an opportunity, especially given Hollywood’s historical lack of support for people of color in front of and behind its cameras. As writers and producers become more diverse, they bring their own experiences, relationships and networks — resulting in well-crafted storylines with recognizable experiences.

These important pop culture moments may seem separate from our day-to-day lives, but stories matter. Research from the Perception Institute says that “culture plays an important role in reinforcing implicit bias, increasing our racial anxieties and undermining conversations about racial equality and opportunity.” And we also know that accurate, honest pop culture narratives can successfully combat stereotypes.

In just the past few weeks, the hit shows Scandal and House of Cards have addressed issues of race, while the 87th Annual Academy Awards became the subject of criticism for failing to include any black actors or directors and few others of color. On Scandal, we witnessed the gripping tale of an unarmed black teen fatally shot by a police officer and a father’s anguish when sitting over his son’s body calling out “He didn’t carry a knife” repeatedly to an ever-growing crowd. The protagonist, Olivia Pope, hired to help diffuse the situation, speaks truth to the police chief when he starts to ready the riot gear: “There is a dead child lying in the street in front of their homes. What would you do if there was a dead child, a child you knew, lying in the street in front of your home? The fact that they stand in groups and say things you do not like does not make them a mob … it makes them Americans.”

In true television fashion, justice comes swiftly when we learn that the knife was planted but not before the officer reveals his biases in a rant: “The truth is, those people in Rosemead have no respect for anything or anyone … Brandon Parker is dead because he didn’t have respect, because those people out there who are chanting and crying over his body, they didn’t teach him the right values.”

Those last few minutes say so much, an officer classifying entire swaths of a community, making a claim that a young child threatened his safety — and having that claim not be questioned, the chief having to be reminded that those gathered and grieving have the right to do so. It’s difficult for me to imagine how any viewer no matter what race would not have been moved by the pain generated in those moments. Importantly, if the media were able to capture the stories of parents, families and communities mourning the needless deaths of Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, Eric Gardner, Weinjian Lu, Rafael Ramos, Deah Shaddy Barakay, Yusor Mohammad and Razan Mohammad Abu-Salha and countless others, change might come about more swiftly.

Yet another timely example was how House of Cards used one its lead characters — the powerful and confident White House Chief of Staff “Remy” — to depict the horror, shame and powerlessness felt by so many men of color in the face of police bias. In a telling scene, Remy was pulled over by local police without apparent cause, arrested and slammed onto the hood of his vehicle just blocks from his post at the White House.

The trend is showing no signs of slowing down. The reactions to the Justice Department’s recent investigations, and the most recent high profile police killing of an unarmed black teen show that these issues will remain a part of the national conversation. Those reactions will continue to shape the stories we tell.

For five years, my colleagues at the W.K Kellogg Foundation, other foundations, our grantees and communities around the nation have generated tangible examples of what change looks like when people have the space to heal and work together for a better world. We embrace those who tell unvarnished stories about the impact of biases, the rich contributions of all people of color, and the benefits of an inclusive playing field. Pop culture is a forum where people are both entertained and enlightened. It simultaneously reflects the culture and pushes it forward. Let’s harness these moments by leveraging your water cooler conversations, social media platforms or mealtime discussions to highlight the impact of our unique stories. We can reimagine and refocus the narrative about people of color in this country, fostering a dialogue built on the equal and inherent value of all people, particularly men, women and children of color.
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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Selling God: American Religion in the Marketplace of Culture

Selling God: American Religion in the Marketplace of Culture


Religion in America is up for sale. The products range from a plethora of merchandise in questionable taste–such as Bible-based diet books (More of Jesus. Less of Me), Rapture T-shirts (one features a basketball game with half its players disappearing in the Rapture–the caption is "Fast Break"), and bumper stickers and Frisbees with inspirational messages–to the unabashed consumerism of Jim Bakker’s Heritage USA, a grandiose Christian theme park with giant water slide, shopping mall, and office complex. We tend to think of these phenomena–which also include a long line of multimillionaire televangelists and the almost manic promotion of Christmas giving–as a fairly recent development. But as R. Laurence Moore points out in Selling God, religion has been deeply involved in our commercial culture since the beginning of the nineteenth century. In a sweeping, colorful history that spans over two centuries of American culture, Moore examines the role of religion in the marketplace, revealing how religious leaders have borrowed (and invented) commercial practices to promote religion–and how business leaders have borrowed (and invented) religion to promote commerce. It is a book peopled by a fascinating roster of American originals, including showman P.T. Barnum and circuit rider Lorenzo Dow, painter Frederick Church and dime novelist Ned Buntline, Sylvester Graham (inventor of the Graham cracker) and the "Poughkeepsie Seer" Andrew Jackson Davis, film directors D.W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille, Norman Vincent Peale and Bishop Fulton J. Sheen. Moore paints insightful portraits of figures such as Mason Locke Weems (Weems’s marriage of aggressive marketing and a moral mission–in such bloody, violent tales as The Drunkard’s Looking Glass or God’s Revenge Against Adultery–was an important starting point of America’s culture industry), religious orator George Whitefield (who transformed church services into mass entertainment, using his acting talents to enthrall vast throngs of people), and Dwight Moody, a former salesman for a boot-and-shoe operation who founded a religious empire centered on the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago (and who advertised his meetings in the entertainment pages of the newspaper). Moore also shows how the Mormons pioneered leisure activities (Brigham Young built the famed Salt Lake Theater, seating 1,500 people, months before work on the Tabernacle started), how Henry Ward Beecher helped the ardent Protestant became the consummate consumer (explicitly justifying the building of expensive mansions, and the collecting of art and antique furniture, as the proper tendencies of pious men), and how the First Amendment, in denying religious groups the status and financial solvency of a state church, forced them to compete in the marketplace for the attention of Americans: religious leaders could either give in to the sway of the market or watch their churches die. Ranging from the rise of gymnasiums and
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Selling God: American Religion in the Marketplace of Culture

Selling God: American Religion in the Marketplace of Culture


Religion in America is up for sale. The products range from a plethora of merchandise in questionable taste–such as Bible-based diet books (More of Jesus. Less of Me), Rapture T-shirts (one features a basketball game with half its players disappearing in the Rapture–the caption is "Fast Break"), and bumper stickers and frisbees with inspirational messages–to the unabashed consumerism of Jim Bakker’s Heritage USA, a grandiose Christian theme park with giant water slide, shopping mall, and office complex. We tend to think of these phenomena–which also include a long line of multimillionaire televangelists and the almost manic promotion of Christmas giving–as a fairly recent development. But as R. Laurence Moore points out in Selling God, religion has been deeply involved in our commercial culture since the beginning of the nineteenth century. In a sweeping, colorful history that spans over two centuries of American culture, Moore examines the role of religion in the marketplace, revealing how religious leaders have borrowed (and invented) commercial practices to promote religion–and how business leaders have borrowed (and invented) religion to promote commerce. It is a book peopled by a fascinating roster of American originals, including showman P.T. Barnum and circuit rider Lorenzo Dow, painter Frederick Church and dime novelist Ned Buntline, Sylvester Graham (inventor of the Graham cracker) and the "Poughkeepsie Seer" Andrew Jackson Davis, film directors D.W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille, Norman Vincent Peale and Bishop Fulton J. Sheen. Moore paints insightful portraits of figures such as Mason Locke Weems (Weems’s marriage of aggressive marketing and a moral mission–in such bloodly, violent tales as The Drunkard’s Looking Glass or God’s Revenge Against Adultery–was an important starting point of America’s culture industry), religious orator George Whitefield (who transformed church services into mass entertainment, using his acting talents to enthrall vast throngs of people), and Dwight Moody, a former salesman for a boot-and-shoe operation who founded a religious empire centered on the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago (and who advertised his meetings in the entertainment pages of the newspaper). Moore also shows how the Mormons pioneered leisure activities (Brigham Young built the famed Salt Lake Theater, seating 1,500 people, months before work on the Tabernacle started), how Henry Ward Beecher helped the ardent Protestant became the consummate consumer (explicitly justifying the building of expensive mansions, and the collecting of art and antique furniture, as the proper tendencies of pious men), and how the First Amendment, in denying religious groups the status and financial solvency of a state church, forced them to compete in the marketplace for the attention of Americans: religious leaders could either give in to the sway of the market or watch their churches die. Ranging from the rise of gymnasiums an
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Japanese Drummers Bring the Culture of Sado Island Statestide

Unlike any musical group I’ve ever heard, Kodo is a group of Japanese drummers that perform on a worldwide scale but remain rooted in the local community and rich cultural traditions of Japan’s Sado Island. The group boasts international esteem and is known for their innovative recreation of the traditional Japanese performing arts. The group spends two-thirds of the year touring (four months in Japan, and four months internationally) counting over 5500 performances in 47 countries worldwide under the theme, “One Earth”. Kodo continues to break boundaries of expression with their unique and vibrant living art-form.

They have been bringing their work to the U.S. since 1975. And thankfully we have the privilege of seeing them again–this time in North America for the Kodo One Earth Tour: Mystery’s debut outside of Japan. This new production, Kodo One Earth Tour: Mystery, was created by its Artistic Director and Japanese Living National Treasure Tamasaburo Bando. The leading Kabuki actor and onnagata (actor specializing in female roles), Bando was a catalyst for Kodo to break new ground in taiko expression.

I had the chance to talk to the group and get a better idea of how they make this unique mix of old and new work. You can see Kodo’s incredible performance live now through the end of March.


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Photo credit: Takashi Okamoto

Steve Mariotti: How did Kodo get started?
Kodo:
In 1971, a handful of young men and women gathered on Japan’s Sado Island to form Sado no Kuni Ondekoza, a way for Japanese youth to learn traditional arts and crafts. They began to study and perform taiko, eventually taking the sound of the drum around the globe on world tours–all with the intention of financially supporting their arts program.

Members lived communally in an abandoned elementary school and spent much of their time practicing the taiko and training to run marathons. After debuting internationally in 1975, Ondekoza emerged as a professional performance group that became highly acclaimed among European and North American audiences. In 1981 the group changed its name to Kodo, with the singular mission of bringing Taiko to ears around the world while preserving various Japanese art forms on Sado Island.

SM: How is Kodo continuing these traditions today?
Kodo:
We are always looking for new ways to explore the profound subtleties of taiko. In the past ten years, this has meant that Kodo is exploring richer levels of stage expression. The Kodo Cultural Foundation supports both local and international activities through education outreach projects designed to give back to local communities.


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Photo credit: Takashi Okamoto

SM: How does Kodo manage its tours and performances?
Kodo:
Since the group’s debut at the Berlin Festival in 1981, Kodo has given over 3,700 performances on all five continents. This comes out to about a third of the year overseas, a third touring in Japan, and a third rehearsing and preparing new material on Sado Island.

As for performances, we stand by three principles to build each performance. Building a Kodo performance program begins with blending these three elements together amidst the sights and sounds of Sado Island. It is then forged into shape on the anvil of dedicated practice and rehearsal.

The first is that performances are based on traditional folk arts, learned from local practitioners throughout Japan. Our intention is not simply to replicate these historical arts. Instead, by reinterpreting and rearranging them for the stage, we strive to capture their universal spirit and energy as they filter through our bodies. Art forms rooted in the earth are developed through intimate relationships both between people and their art as well as between art and nature. Therein lie invaluable treasures rich with insights for people living in a bewildering age.


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Photo credit: Takashi Okamoto

Secondly, performances feature compositions by Kodo’s friends and mentors. These include composers Maki Ishii and Shinichiro Ikebe, Kabuki musicians RoetsuTosha and KiyohikoSemba, jazz pianist Yosuke Yamashita and Tamasaburo Bando.

The third element is that we use original works composed by Kodo members. In this case, Kodo’s members leverage their exposure to the rhythms and sounds of the many people and places they have visited as inspiration for their own creations.

SM: What is the process for joining Kodo?
Kodo:
Apprentices who hope to become performers or staff members will spend two years living together communally in what was once an abandoned schoolhouse. After this period, Apprentices who have been selected to become Junior Members spend one more year training and practicing in the hope that at the end of the year they will be chosen to become part of the Kodo organization.

Altogether there are currently about 100 members of Kodo, including 35 performing members including 6 junior members (27 men and 8 women) and 37 staff members. The performers range in age from 20 to 64 years old. We have 5 staff members from Sado Island. Our other members come from as far away as Hokkaido and Kyushu, and from everywhere in between.


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Photo credit: Takashi Okamoto

SM: What is the Kodo Apprenticeship program?
Kodo:
In a converted schoolhouse in Kakinoura on Sado Island, young people are trained, not just in musical technique but also in all matters of body and spirit. Beginning in April, apprentices live communally and train for two years. From this group, probationary members are selected to spend one year as junior members, and if they are successful, they then become full Kodo members.

Kodo seeks people of all backgrounds who are interested in becoming apprentices, and perhaps the next generation of Kodo players. Apprentices live together while they learn taiko, dance, song, and other traditional arts in the rich natural and cultural surroundings of Sado. We have some specific rules for living there: drinking alcohol, smoking, using a mobile phone and internet capable devices of any kind are prohibited during apprenticeship, and they are given the time to fully devote themselves to their lifestyle on Sado.

Upon completion of the program, apprentices hoping to become Kodo members may be selected to become probationary members. Probationary members spend an additional year training on the job and can become full-fledged Kodo members if they pass the final stage of selection.


2015-02-25-hekireki02_printphotocreditTakashiOkamoto.jpg

Photo credit: Takashi Okamoto

SM: How do members get recruited into the process, and what is daily life like once you are a member of Kodo?
Eri Uchida, member since 2010:
I started playing taiko in a local taiko group in Japan when I was sixteen, and then I moved to Canada to study abroad at a public high school. After I graduated from high school, I went back to Japan and decided that Kodo’s Apprentice Centre really was the best place to study.

On the day of a performance, I exercise near the hotel, eat a good breakfast, and see what kind of condition I am in that day. We create our daily rhythm by loading in and setting up the stage in a timely manner. While the technical crew take over the stage to set-up the lighting, we eat lunch, lightly exercise, and rehearse.

SM: What do you hope to accomplish during this North American tour?
EU:
This tour’s production, “Kodo One Earth Tour: Mystery,” features a lot of theatrical moments, so the timing and delivery are very important.I think the right “timing” may vary between different countries and environments. Therefore, it will be challenging to react accordingly and nail that “timing” in each performance. I want to make each performance the best performance for that particular place and audience. Also, the number of people playing taiko worldwide is on the rise and I think that the North American taiko community is very humble and constantly thinks about what taiko means to them. Interacting with them and performing for them makes me think about my own taiko playing, too.


2015-02-25-hekireki03_printphotocreditTakashiOkamoto.jpg

Photo credit: Takashi Okamoto

SM: What do you think the artistic vision is for this tour?
Yuta Sumiyoshi, Kodo member:
We started off by taking apart our production style and any fixed idea we had. We were constantly challenged to express ourselves as a single taiko performer and a Kodo member, without the traditional happi coats and hachimaki headbands. I believe one of Tamasaburo Bando’s vision for Kodo is to broaden theatrical expression by learning how to express delicate musicality instead of just hitting the drums with all our might. In addition to the beauty that is being portrayed for each individual when we play taiko to the fullest, we are asked to work through the beauty of performing arts as well.
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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Selling God: American Religion in the Marketplace of Culture

Selling God: American Religion in the Marketplace of Culture


Religion in America is up for sale. The products range from a plethora of merchandise in questionable taste–such as Bible-based diet books (More of Jesus. Less of Me), Rapture T-shirts (one features a basketball game with half its players disappearing in the Rapture–the caption is Fast
Break), and bumper stickers and Frisbees with inspirational messages–to the unabashed consumerism of Jim Bakker''s Heritage USA, a grandiose Christian theme park with giant water slide, shopping mall, and office complex. We tend to think of these phenomena–which also include a long line of
multimillionaire televangelists and the almost manic promotion of Christmas giving–as a fairly recent development. But as R. Laurence Moore points out in Selling God, religion has been deeply involved in our commercial culture since the beginning of the nineteenth century.
In a sweeping, colorful history that spans over two centuries of American culture, Moore examines the role of religion in the marketplace, revealing how religious leaders have borrowed (and invented) commercial practices to promote religion–and how business leaders have borrowed (and invented)
religion to promote commerce. It is a book peopled by a fascinating roster of American originals, including showman P.T. Barnum and circuit rider Lorenzo Dow, painter Frederick Church and dime novelist Ned Buntline, Sylvester Graham (inventor of the Graham cracker) and the Poughkeepsie Seer Andrew
Jackson Davis, film directors D.W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille, Norman Vincent Peale and Bishop Fulton J. Sheen. Moore paints insightful portraits of figures such as Mason Locke Weems (Weems''s marriage of aggressive marketing and a moral mission–in such bloody, violent tales as The Drunkard''s
Looking Glass or God''s Revenge Against Adultery–was an important starting point of America''s culture industry), religious orator George Whitefield (who transformed church services into mass entertainment, using his acting talents to enthrall vast throngs of people), and Dwight Moody, a former
salesman for a boot-and-shoe operation who founded a religious empire centered on the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago (and who advertised his meetings in the entertainment pages of the newspaper). Moore also shows how the Mormons pioneered leisure activities (Brigham Young built the famed Salt Lake
Theater, seating 1,500 people, months before work on the Tabernacle started), how Henry Ward Beecher helped the ardent Protestant became the consummate consumer (explicitly justifying the building of expensive mansions, and the collecting of art and antique furniture, as the proper tendencies of
pious men), and how the First Amendment, in denying religious groups the status and financial solvency of a state church, forced them to compete in the marketplace for the attention of Americans: religious leaders could either give in to the sway of the market or watch their churches die.
Ranging from the rise of gymnasiums and muscular Christianity, to the creation of the Chautauqua movement (blending devotional services with concerts, fireworks, bonfires, and humorous lectures), to Oral Robert''s Blessing Pacts and L. Ron Hubbard''s Church of Scientology, Selling God provides
both fascinating social history and an insightful look at religion in America.
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Wellcoda Saints and Sinners Women’s NEW Skulls & Swords Urban Culture Biker Crown Swords Coat of Arms Hip Hop Gangster Hoodie S-XL

Wellcoda Saints and Sinners Women’s NEW Skulls & Swords Urban Culture Biker Crown Swords Coat of Arms Hip Hop Gangster Hoodie S-XL


Extended 60 Days Hassle FREE Christmas Returns/Exchanges Service, All Orders Shipped Within 24 Hours – Rakuten’s delivery times are only guidelines Premium Quality, Professionally Hand Printed Garments in the UK to High Street Standards, Extremely comfortable to Wear 80% Preshrunk Soft Style Cotton/20% Polyester, 279 g/m? Machine Washable – Cool

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Enzo Angiolini Pop Culture Womens Size 11 Purple Pumps Heels Shoes New/Display

Enzo Angiolini Pop Culture Womens Size 11 Purple Pumps Heels Shoes New/Display


Size – 11 US Brand & Style – Enzo Angiolini Pop Culture Width – Medium (B, M) True Color – Dk Pink Upper Material – Suede Outsole Material – Man-Made Heel Height – 4 Inches Description – As name suggests, many of the footwear designs from Enzo Angiolini exhibit a particular elegance associated with classic Italian shoes. The brand’s dedication to quality even shows in the smallest detail, be it stitching, beadwork, buckles, or playful rhinestone embellishments. No wonder savvy shoe shoppers feel certain that Enzo Angiolini can provide them with the perfect, high-fashion, dependably comfortable footwear choice for any occasion. They devote themselves to women’s shoes that offer sophisticated, luxurious European styling at affordable prices. All shoes that bear the brand feature materials of outstanding quality, combined with superior craftsmanship in comfortable designs on the cutting edge of tasteful style. 1142533

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Visions of Culture

Visions of Culture


Visions of Culture: An Annotated Reader is an anthology of articles coordinated for use with Visions of Culture: An Introduction to Anthropological Theories and Theorists. Each selection is prefaced with a brief introduction about the anthropologist and the text. Each primary text is followed by a section titled “Queries and Connections,” a series of questions designed to help students focus on the central issues in each text and to relate them to other readings. The Visions of Culture Value Pack is available when you order directly from AltaMira Press. Order these two books as part of the Visions of Culture Value Pack using a single isbn for a 20% discount! Click here to order online. Includes: 1. Visions of Culture: An Introduction to Anthropological Theories and Theorists Fourth Edition Jerry D. Moore 2012 Find full information on the fourth edition of Visions of Culture here. 2. Visions of Culture An Annotated Reader Jerry D. Moore 2009

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Listen Carefully, This Is What Rape Culture Sounds Like In America

Two women just explained the insidious nature of rape culture in under three minutes.

At the 2014 National Poetry Slam in August, spoken word artists Desireé Dallagiacomo and Mwende Katwiwa (a.k.a FreeQuency) performed the poem “American Rape Culture,” and explained how some of the songs we sing along to on the radio are directly contributing to rape culture. The result is a bold poem that reminds us how subtle — and dangerous — misogyny can be when put to a pop song tune.

Dallagiacomo begins the spoken word by pointing out that Robin Thicke sings the line “I know you want it,” 18 times in “Blurred Lines.” Katwiwa adds that in Rick Ross’ “You Ain’t Even Know It” the rapper says, “Put molly all in her champagne, she ain’t even know it. Took her home and I enjoyed that, she ain’t even know it.” Rape culture has become so mainstream that we hardly bat an eye when music icons sing about it.

“If you take the time on any given day to pay attention, you really start to notice these elements of rape culture permeating almost all areas of American life,” Katwiwa told The Huffington Post. “Many of the examples used in the poem were things Des and I had already heard of or read about prior to sitting to write the piece, but when we did additional research, we were kinda overwhelmed with all the different examples we could have put in our poem.”

Katwiwa’s and Dallagiacomo remind us how intolerable these trends in pop culture are when you consider that nearly one in five women will be raped in their lifetimes. As Katwiwa says in the poem, “Rape no longer only knows closed doors and dark alleyways, it’s assimilated into our daily routine.”

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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Zimbabwe Women in Culture, Business & Travel

Zimbabwe Women in Culture, Business & Travel


Women often occupy different roles in a foreign culture. Avoid offensive assumptions and behavior by understanding the position of women in Zimbabwean society: their legal rights; access to education and health care; workforce participation; and their dating, marriage, and family life.
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Polynesian Seafaring and Navigation: Ocean Travel in Anutan Culture and Society

Polynesian Seafaring and Navigation: Ocean Travel in Anutan Culture and Society


Without seafaring canoes, deep-sea sailing skills, and the ability to navigate by naked-eye observations of the stars and sea and bird life, there would have been no Polynesian people as we know them today. These islanders are as much a creation of their voyaging technology as they were creators of it. Had they and their ancestors not developed this technology and associated sailing and navigational skills, the ancestral Polynesians could never have ventured out into the middle of the pacific to find and settle so many islands and thereby develop into a sizable and culturally distinct people. There are a few out-of-the-way Polynesian islands where some facets of the old maritime tradition apparently survive today. One such island is Anuta, a tiny volcanic island which, though located within the Solomon Islands of Melanesia, is populated by Polynesians. Because of the small size of the island, its remoteness, and its lack of commercially viable resources, Anutans there still live close to the traditional pattern of their ancestors. They make and sail their canoes in more or less the same way that their ancestors did, and the sea so pervades their lives that much can be learned of the way Polynesians have adapted to their oceanic environment by looking at how Anutans interact with the sea. from the Foreword by Ben Finney, Professor of Anthropology, University of Hawaii. After fourteen months of field research in 1972-73 and an additional four months of field work with Anutans in the Solomon Islands capital of Honiara in 1983, Richard Feinberg here provides a thorough study of Anutan seafaring and navigation. In doing so, he gives rare insights into the larger picture of how Polynesians have adapted to the sea. This richly illustrated book explores the theory and technique used by Anutans in construction, use, and handling of their craft; the navigational skills still employed in interisland voyaging; and their culturally patterned attitudes toward the ocean and travel

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Western Europe – Culture Smart!: The Essential Guide To Customs & Culture

Western Europe – Culture Smart!: The Essential Guide To Customs & Culture


The historic countries of Western Europe – Austria, Belgium, Britain, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Netherlands, Spain, and Switzerland – are the jewels in the crown of European civilization. Their importance and attraction for the rest of the world are so great that the region is the prime travel destination for businesspeople, tourists, and students. Western Europe is a relatively compact geographical area, containing an enormous diversity of landscapes, peoples, and cultures. The historically competitive Western Europeans are unlike each other in many ways, yet share an underlying system of values, and the restless Western European spirit of enquiry, enterprise, and adventure has had a decisive impact on world history. In the past, their empires spread their languages, religions, arts, and ideologies around the globe, and today the world beats a pathway to their doors. For foreign visitors, first encounters in Western Europe can be overwhelming. The richness and complexity of the different national cultures are difficult to take in, and people’s behavior and reactions can be surprisingly unpredictable.For example, attitudes to time vary. In Germany it’s rude to be late; in France it’s rude to be on time. In business there is a range of negotiating styles. And because there is more to communication than speech, it is easy to misread the signals in other people’s societies. Even smiling can sometimes be wrong – in France it’s distinctly uncool to smile at strangers. Western Europe is ideal for student travelers, businesspeople, or academics who will be visiting several countries on their trip and who don’t wish to be burdened with eleven books on different destinations. In this it is unique. No other book captures the essence of eleven national cultures in a single volume. Drawing on the wealth of information in the individual Culture Smart! country guides, it focuses on those situations in each country where visitors are likely to come into contact with local people. Beyond listing the dos and don’ts, it explains the cultural context of different or unexpected behavior. It tells you about beliefs and attitudes, and alerts you to local manners and sensitive issues. Full of fascinating insights and practical advice, it will help you navigate your way through uncharted seas, avoid gaffes and misunderstandings, and establish a rapport with people wherever you are.
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Òrìsà Devotion As World Religion: The Globalization Of Yorùbá Religious Culture

Òrìsà Devotion As World Religion: The Globalization Of Yorùbá Religious Culture


As the twenty-first century begins, tens of millions of people participate in devotions to the spirits called Òrìsà. This book explores the emergence of Òrìsà devotion as a world religion, one of the most remarkable and compelling developments in the history of the human religious quest. Originating among the Yorùbá people of West Africa, the varied traditions that comprise Òrìsà devotion are today found in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Australia.    The African spirit proved remarkably resilient in the face of the transatlantic slave trade, inspiring the perseverance of African religion wherever its adherents settled in the New World. Among the most significant manifestations of this spirit, Yorùbá religious culture persisted, adapted, and even flourished in the Americas, especially in Brazil and Cuba, where it thrives as Candomblé and Lukumi/Santería, respectively. After the end of slavery in the Americas, the free migrations of Latin American and African practitioners has further spread the religion to places like New York City and Miami. Thousands of African Americans have turned to the religion of their ancestors, as have many other spiritual seekers who are not themselves of African descent.     Ifá divination in Nigeria, Candomblé funerary chants in Brazil, the role of music in Yorùbá revivalism in the United States, gender and representational authority in Yorùbá religious culture—these are among the many subjects discussed here by experts from around the world. Approaching Òrìsà devotion from diverse vantage points, their collective effort makes this one of the most authoritative texts on Yorùbá religion and a groundbreaking book that heralds this rich, complex, and variegated tradition as one of the world’s great religions.   
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Touring New York Arts and Culture

It would be a mistake to view New York’s arts and culture landscape in isolation, confined to geographic borders. Among the reasons — there are many — is that our artists and institutions tour both domestically and abroad, and in doing so act as ambassadors for our metropolitan area and participate in a critical flow of creativity and ideas. As a proud New Yorker and an internationalist, I advocate the continuous advancement of this flow.

The organization I run, Dance/NYC, publishes research on touring in nonprofit dance. Snapshot analyses, based on a Cultural Data Project sample of 87 local dance companies, show annual performances on tour at 1,380, a significant 45 percent of total performances. They also show the importance of touring as a source of growth capital, increasing as a share of companies’ earned income as annual budget sizes increase, from 12 percent for the smallest companies up to 47 percent for those in $ 1-5 million range. Touring drops to 19 percent of earned income for those with budgets of more than $ 5 million, suggesting a need for developing new approaches focused on this segment.

Trend analyses over a two-year (2009-2011) period are worrying. Performances on tour declined 8 percent, and total income from touring fell 2 percent. These losses were felt unevenly across budget categories, and the smallest companies, with budgets of less than $ 100K, even saw a dramatic 163 percent increase in touring income. Midsize companies, in the $ 500-999K range, experienced the most sizable financial loss, at 32 percent.

As these data demonstrate touring need and opportunity along the continuums of organizational budget sizes and lives in dance, some, such as American Dance Abroad, are already developing solutions for New York. This new entity, cofounded by Carolelinda Dickey and Andrea Snyder three years ago, has launched Beyond Our Borders, a training and networking initiative to better prepare New York area dance companies for international exchange.

The effort complements existing American Dance Abroad projects, including Rapid Response, a quick-turnaround assistance program to support transit costs for dance artists, and American Dance Recon, a symposium for international presenters to reconnect with American dance and/or to use it as reconnaissance. This fall, Dance/NYC will for the third year cosponsor an American Dance Recon town hall, connecting New York artists to presenters participating in a local edition of this symposium.

The work of American Dance Abroad builds on Dance America: An International Strategy for American Dance, a report commissioned and published in 2010 by Dance/USA, the national service organization for professional dance, with support from the Robert Sterling Clark Foundation, a leader in promoting international arts engagement. The report is data driven, responding in part to survey findings from dance companies that prioritize three interconnected areas of needed service to support international exchange: access and opportunities, information and training, and financial support. The report aims to create value by taking a holistic approach, emphasizing tactics that are doable in a changeable political and economic environment, and encouraging partnerships among government agencies, institutions, and within the dance field.

I am using dance as my subject here, but am also sharing lessons that may be useful to New York arts and culture as a whole and the city’s future as a cultural capital. Finally, in advocating touring and exchange, I am adding to my recent writing on cultural planning for the City of New York that any such planning could benefit from the inclusion of domestic and international strategy. Dance/NYC research and the work of American Dance Abroad offer helpful starting points.

Note: I began this blog at the 2014 Internationale Tanzmesse in Düsseldorf, Germany, a biennial marketplace and festival platform focused on contemporary dance. I was a part of the American Corner delegation, cosponsored by American Dance Abroad, Association of Performing Arts Presenters, and Dance/USA, a welcome example of collaboration and common messaging (Dance/NYC also works in alliance with Dance/USA).
Arts – The Huffington Post
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The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture: Volume Six: US Popular Print Culture 1860-1920

The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture: Volume Six: US Popular Print Culture 1860-1920


What did most people read? Where did they get it? Where did it come from? What were its uses in its readers'' lives? How was it produced and distributed? What were its relations to the wider world of print culture? How did it develop over time? These questions are central toThe Oxford History
of Popular Print Culture, an ambitious nine-volume series devoted to the exploration of popular print culture in English from the beginning of the sixteenth century to the present.

Volume six explores a cornucopia of US popular print materials from 1860 to 1920, the period when mass culture exploded into the everyday lives of large swathes of the population. Thirty specially written essays by scholars from a wide range of disciplines – history of the book; literary, cultural,
media, and film studies; social history, journalism, and American Studies – probe the material conditions, proliferating genres, and cultural work of newly affordable and accessible forms. A dozen short entries address additional topics, genres, and approaches. A chronology of the relevant legal,
technological, and organizational developments of the period and a list of online and physical archives provide further support for study in this burgeoning field. Cumulatively, the volume revisions the power of ''the popular'' in its many meanings – widely circulated, commercialised, vernacular,
working-class, cheap, accessible; it recovers and analyses neglected cultural webs and networks, as well as individual authors, famous and forgotten; and it interrogates conventional cultural hierarchies and high/low binaries.

The volume pursues some key issues in rich archival and analytical detail. How did new technologies of production and distribution shape a plethora of print forms, including advertising leaflets, postcards, tracts, pamphlets, dime novels, story papers, newspapers, magazines, and cheap books? How did
upheavals in the publishing industry and new regulatory mechanisms affect circulation and consumption? How did various genres mediate social and political transformations of the period? How did popular print forms consolidate transnational and borderlands networks? How were particular cultural
communities, including Native American, African American, Asian American, and Mexican / America alternately served and oppressed by popular print? How was it seized in support of labour and woman suffrage, and how was it wielded by governmental and educational institutions? How did print interact
with other media?
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The Making of the Cold War Enemy: Culture and Politics in the Military-Intellectual Complex

The Making of the Cold War Enemy: Culture and Politics in the Military-Intellectual Complex


At the height of the Cold War, the U.S. government enlisted the aid of a select group of psychologists, sociologists, and political scientists to blueprint enemy behavior. Not only did these academics bring sophisticated concepts to what became a project of demonizing communist societies, but they influenced decision-making in the map rooms, prison camps, and battlefields of the Korean War and in Vietnam. With verve and insight, Ron Robin tells the intriguing story of the rise of behavioral scientists in government and how their potentially dangerous, “American” assumptions about human behavior would shape U.S. views of domestic disturbances and insurgencies in Third World countries for decades to come. Based at government-funded think tanks, the experts devised provocative solutions for key Cold War dilemmas, including psychological warfare projects, negotiation strategies during the Korean armistice, and morale studies in the Vietnam era. Robin examines factors that shaped the scientists’ thinking and explores their psycho-cultural and rational choice explanations for enemy behavior. He reveals how the academics’ intolerance for complexity ultimately reduced the nation’s adversaries to borderline psychotics, ignored revolutionary social shifts in post-World War II Asia, and promoted the notion of a maniacal threat facing the United States. Putting the issue of scientific validity aside, Robin presents the first extensive analysis of the intellectual underpinnings of Cold War behavioral sciences in a book that will be indispensable reading for anyone interested in the era and its legacy.

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Sweden – Culture Smart!

Sweden – Culture Smart!


The best-selling Culture Smart! series continues where other guides leave off. Whether you are travelling on business or pleasure, long-term or short, Culture Smart! is your pocket-sized cultural roadmap that never goes out of date, highlighting key country customs, etiquette, and how to avoid cultural gaffes when out and about. Local knowledge is vital for peace of mind and personal safety when travelling, providing invaluable insights on every page on what to expect, how to behave and how to get along with the locals. Culture Smart! has become ‘as essential as remembering to pack your passport’ (Stanfords Travel Bookshop). Be a responsible traveller with Culture Smart!, the smarter way to travel. ‘Undeniably as useful as they are entertaining.’ – easyJet Magazine, May 2004 ‘These small treasure troves ensure that you will never put your size 11 travelling shoes in it again!’ – Ocean View Magazine, Issue 3 Autumn/Winter 2003 ‘This new range of indispensable guides is devoted entirely to gaining a better understanding of the people, customs and traditions.’ – Odyssey Travel Magazine, Spring/Summer 2003

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Researching Children’s Popular Culture

Researching Children’s Popular Culture


The place of childhood in popular culture is one that invites new readings both on childhood itself, but also on approaches to studying childhood. Discussing different methods of researching children’s popular culture, they argue that the interplay of the age of the players, the status of their popular culture, the transience of the objects, and indeed the ephemerality – and long lastingness – of childhood, all contribute to what could be regarded as a particularized space for childhood studies – and one that challenges many of the conventions of “doing research” involving children.

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A Guide to Irish Culture: History, Rural Traditions, Arts, Events, Famous Architectural Sites, Cuisines, and More

A Guide to Irish Culture: History, Rural Traditions, Arts, Events, Famous Architectural Sites, Cuisines, and More


New – Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. The Irish culture has taken thousands of years to develop. The Irish love traditions which is why the country is full of them. Two of the most enduring and internationally famed traditions are Irish music and dance. Traditional music can be heard all over the country from city centre pubs to rural festivals. With ancient myths and legends to uncover, amazing lands

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Rough Trade Counter Culture 2008 (2CD)

Rough Trade Counter Culture 2008 (2CD)


Disc 1 Department Of Eagles – Classical Records Bon Iver – Flume The Low Anthem – Charlie Darwin Peter Broderick – Below It Fleet Foxes – White Winter Hymnal El Guincho – Palmitos Park Festival – Fair And True The Acorn – The Lullaby (Mountain) Headless Heroes – The North Wind Blew South The Heart Strings – Jose Fernandez The School – All I Wanna Do Atlas Sound – Recent Bedroom Sic Alps – Sing Song Waitress Crystal Stilts – Graveyard Orbit Vivian Girls – Where Do You Run To Koko Von Napoo – Polly Lucky Dragons – Oh I Understand High Places – Vision’s The First… Softboiled Eggies – Only Loved At Night Telepathe – Chrome’s On It Zombie Zombie – What’s Happening In The City? Emporer Machine – Swiss Machine Disc 2 Chris Corsano – What Movement Helps You When You Are Trying To Run Out A Batsman? Boris – Laserbeam Times New Viking – My Head Gun Outfit – Your Will Correcto – Joni The Pains Of Being Pure At Heart – Come Saturday The Shitty Limits – Here Are The Limits HEALTH – TRICERATOPS Indian Jewelry – Temporary Famine Ship Shit And Shine – Shit No! Salem – Redlights Opium Factory – Rainbeaux Alva Noto – U_08-1 2562 – Kameleon (Edit) Dusk And Blackdown – The Bits Ft. Trim (Edit) Flying Lotus – GNG BNG Tobacco – Dirt (Ft. Aesop Rock) Rustie – Zig-Zag Yo Majesty – Blame It On The Change ZZT – The Worm (Edit) Mark Stewart – Mr. You’re A Better Man Than I Pablo – Record Shop

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Discover Ethnic Neighborhoods Food & Culture of Los Angeles

Discover Ethnic Neighborhoods Food & Culture of Los Angeles

Uncover the astounding mix of nationalities that make up the City of Angels on this Los Angeles food tour that reveals hole-in-the-wall eateries markets snack shops and the fine art of riding the metro. Who said you need a car in LA?
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Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture

Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture


In this hip, accessible primer to the music, literature, and art of Afrofuturism, author Ytasha Womack introduces readers to the burgeoning community of artists creating Afrofuturist works, the innovators from the past, and the wide range of subjects they explore. From the sci-fi literature of Samuel Delany, Octavia Butler, and N. K. Jemisin to the musical cosmos of Sun Ra, George Clinton, and the Black Eyed Peas’ will.i.am, to the visual and multimedia artists inspired by African Dogon myths and Egyptian deities, the book’s topics range from the “alien” experience of blacks in America to the “wake up” cry that peppers sci-fi literature, sermons, and activism. With a twofold aim to entertain and enlighten, Afrofuturists strive to break down racial, ethnic, and social limitations to empower and free individuals to be themselves.

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Walking the Aqueduct: Tuscan Adventures and Culture

Walking the Aqueduct: Tuscan Adventures and Culture


Tuscany. What’s it really like? The author of the “Inside Tuscany: A Second Time Around” guide book series offers a new book of stories about living and traveling in Tuscany. Book Sections and Chapters The book explores living in Tuscany in six sections: I. The Aretine: description of the major hill town of Arezzo and its Saturday and Antique markets, the Giostra del Saracino, and the WW II atrocity at nearby Civitella. II. Culture: including the role of the Catholic church, customs and courtesies, tiny specialty stores, a week in Italian school, the passeggiata, grape harvest, hosting guests, and bureaucracy. III. Food: good restaurants and bars, ordering caffe, Tuscan bread, and eating as a guest in someone’s home. IV. Traveling and Living: stories of exploration, dealing with an accident, an 18th century rectory, photo hints, culture shock, the evolution of connectivity, and cell phones. V. Driving: driving in the city, on the autostrada, navigating in cities and the countryside, and short term Italian driver thinking. VI. Walking the Aqueduct and the magic of discovery. The author’s guidebooks on Amazon and iTunes cover . . . Arezzo, the Valdichiana, Cortona, Chianti and Val d’Orcia, and the Casentino and Valtiberina on Amazon.com. The Churches of Arezzo, the Museums of Arezzo, Cortona are on iTunes.

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Culture and the Ad

Culture and the Ad


If, through the years, American advertising has offered a clean and simple approach to getting out the word on new products or services, it has also made a complex, disturbing, and fascinating statement about American ideals and ideologies. This book, accessible to all readers, provides the necessary tools to interpret and understand in historical perspective how the American advertising industry portrays anyone other than the white American mainstreamAfrican Americans, women, Native Americans, tourists of many nationalities, all of whom have come to be known as the otherin its print media. With more than one hundred carefully selected illustrations, Professor OBarr takes us on an enlightening excursion from two early American travel manuals (which so subtly and perhaps even unconsciously delineated a hegemonic ideology to the amateur American tourist-photographer), to advertisements in the 1929 National Geographic magazine, to Dennis ORourkes disturbing 1987 film Cannibal Tours, to images of blackness across the twentieth century, and on to the representation of the Japanese (and, conversely, their representation of white Americans) in contemporary times.Though the author writes in a witty and readable style for the student and general reader, the argument he develops is one of profound seriousness: that the representation of foreigners and other categories of outsiders who appear in advertisements provides paradigms for relations between members of advertisings intended audience and those defined as outside of it. These paradigms constitute an ideological guide for relationsof hierarchy, dominance, and subordinationbetween self and others, between us and them.

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Victorian Bathing and Bathing Suits: The Culture of the Two-Piece Bathing Dress from 1837 – 1901

Victorian Bathing and Bathing Suits: The Culture of the Two-Piece Bathing Dress from 1837 – 1901


When I decided to create a new bathing suit pattern, I searched for a modern book documenting Victorian bathing suits. To my surprise, I couldn’t find one. Yet I had quite a few period magazines with engravings of bathing dresses in my collection. While I was doing more research, I fell in love with the traditions and ethics surrounding American, English, and French bathing.This book focuses on the culture of swimming and sea bathing across the decades, and on women’s bathing suits, noting their styles, variations, and evolution, all quoted from the original writers of that time. For your enjoyment, I’ve included descriptions and engravings of men’s and children’s suits when I could find them, but their clothing was not as well documented as the ladies’ dresses.The culture and proper dress of bathing changed radically during Queen Victoria’s reign, led, of course, by the French. The accepted ladies’ one-piece bathing gown gave way to the two-piece bathing suit, and bathing went from a medical treatment to a social event.Even the French bathing dress was not admired in its early days. It was plain, usually black, and, at best, boring. But once fashion got hold of the bathing suit, the dress evolved rapidly. By 1870, many bathing suits were downright gorgeous. Fashion magazines began to include descriptions and engravings on a regular basis, vying to provide the most up-to-date styles. Bathing went from a quick, unpleasant dip in the ocean to true enjoyment, and even swimming became popular.Victorian Bathing and Bathing Suits has over 125 period illustrations. It is intended for costume historians, bathing enthusiasts, Victorian re-enactors, historical writers and history buffs.

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Reading Beyond the Book: The Social Practices of Contemporary Literary Culture

Reading Beyond the Book: The Social Practices of Contemporary Literary Culture


Literary culture has become a form of popular culture over the last fifteen years thanks to the success of televised book clubs, film adaptations, big-box book stores, online bookselling, and face-to-face and online book groups. This volume offers the first critical analysis of mass reading events and the contemporary meanings of reading in the UK, USA, and Canada based on original interviews and surveys with readers and event organizers. The resurgence of book groups has inspired new cultural formations of what the authors call “shared reading.” They interrogate the enduring attraction of an old technology for readers, community organizers, and government agencies, exploring the social practices inspired by the sharing of books in public spaces and revealing the complex ideological investments made by readers, cultural workers, institutions, and the mass media in the meanings of reading.
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Hot Stuff: Disco and the Remaking of American Culture

Hot Stuff: Disco and the Remaking of American Culture


Disco thumps back to life in this pulsating look at the culture and politics that gave rise to the music. In the 1970s, as the disco tsunami engulfed America, the question, “Do you wanna dance?” became divisive, even explosive. What was it about this music that made it such hot stuff? In this incisive history, Alice Echols reveals the ways in which disco, assumed to be shallow and disposable, permanently transformed popular music, propelling it into new sonic territory and influencing rap, techno, and trance. This account probes the complex relationship between disco and the era’s major movements: gay liberation, feminism, and African American rights. But it never loses sight of the era’s defining soundtrack, spotlighting the work of precursors James Brown and Isaac Hayes, its dazzling divas Donna Summer and the women of Labelle, and some of its lesser-known but no less illustrious performers like Sylvester. You’ll never say “disco sucks” again after reading this fascinating account of the music you thought you hated but can’t stop dancing to.

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Magazine Movements: Women’s Culture, Feminisms and Media Form

Magazine Movements: Women’s Culture, Feminisms and Media Form


All women’s magazines are not the same: content, outlook, and format combine to shape publications quite distinctively. While magazines in general have long been understood as a significant force in women’s lives, many critiques have limited themselves to discussions of mainstream printed publications that engage with narrowly stereotypical representations of femininity. Looking at a range of women’s magazines (“Cooperative Correspondence Club “and “Housewife) “and magazine programmes (“Woman’s Hour” and “Houseparty”), “Magazine Movements” not only extends our definition of a magazine, but most importantly, unearths the connections between women’s cultures, specific magazines and the implied reader. The author first outlines the existing field of magazine studies, and analyzes the methodologies employed in accessing and assessing the cultural competence of magazines. Each chapter then provides a case study of a different kind of magazine: different in media form or style of presentation or audience connection, or all three. Forster not only extends our definition of a magazine, but most importantly, unearths the connections between women’s cultures, specific magazines and the implied reader. In this way, fresh insights are provided into the long-standing importance of the magazine to the variety of feminisms on offer in Britain, from the mid twentieth century to the present day.

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Food History Almanac: Over 1,300 Years of World Culinary History, Culture, and Social Influence

Food History Almanac: Over 1,300 Years of World Culinary History, Culture, and Social Influence


The Food History Almanac covers 365 days of the year, with information and anecdotes relating to food history from around the world from medieval times to the present. The daily entries include such topics as celebrations; significant food-related moments in history from the fields of science and technology, exploration and discovery, travel, literature, hotel and restaurant history, and military history; menus from famous and infamous meals across a wide spectrum, from extravagant royal banquets to war rations and prison fare; birthdays of important people in the food field; and publication dates for important cookbooks and food texts and first known recipes. Food historian Janet Clarkson has drawn from her vast compendium of historical cookbooks, food texts, scholarly articles, journals, diaries, ships logs, letters, official reports, and newspaper and magazine articles to bring food history alive. History buffs, foodies, students doing reports, and curious readers will find it a constant delight. An introduction, list of recipes, selected bibliography, and set index, plus a number of period illustrations are added value.

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7 Hilarious Vine Videos Teach Us About Pidgin, The Humuhumunukunukuāpuaʻa, And Local Hawaiian Culture

For many visitors to Hawaii, it can be difficult to get a glimpse of the local color and culture. After all, if you stay in Waikiki for your whole vacation, you’ll never hear pidgin phrases like “da kine” — which can mean anything you want it to — or understand the local practice of only using the words mauka (mountain-side) and makai (ocean-side) when giving directions.

Thankfully, Hawaii Vines — a Facebook page that hopes to spread aloha with Hawaii humor — offers 7-second windows into the vibrant, fun-loving and diverse culture on the islands. Below, 7 of our favorites:

1. Hawaii’s Fabulous State Fish: The Humuhumunukunukuāpuaʻa

2. The Difference Between How Hawaii Surfers and California Surfers Measure Waves

3. Getting In Trouble With Da Parents

4. When A Haole (White Person) Gives Directions Vs. When A Local Does

5. The Best Indicator That You’re In A Tourist Trap

6. The Haka, Because Everyone Here Knows It

7. Trying To Take Da Bus As A Child

Comedy – The Huffington Post
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X vs. y: A Culture War, a Love Story

X vs. y: A Culture War, a Love Story


Seen through the eyes of siblings 14 years apart in age, “X vs. Y” is a smart, funny, stylish, and visually driven anthology that com-piles and compares their two generational cul-tures. It’s a story told through lists, infographics, essays, anecdotes, and images, with chapters devoted to fashion, TV, music, technology, dating, books, and movies. Through musings on topics such as leg warmers, “Clueless,” “Sassy” magazine, and MTV, along with mixtapes and TV characters, “X vs. Y” paints a portrait of two intricately entwined generations.

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Travelling Languages: Culture, Communication and Translation in a Mobile World

Travelling Languages: Culture, Communication and Translation in a Mobile World


Based on the commonly held assumption that we now live in a world that is on the move, with growing opportunities for both real and virtual travel and the blurring of boundaries between previously defined places, societies and cultures, the theme of this book is firmly grounded in the interdisciplinary field of Mobilities . Mobilities deals with the movement of people, objects, capital, information, ideas and cultures on varying scales, and across a variety of borders, from the local to the national to the global. It includes all forms of travel from forced migration for economic or political reasons, to leisure travel and tourism, to virtual travel via the myriad of electronic channels now available to much of the world s population. Underpinning the choice of theme is a desire to consider the important role of languages and intercultural communication in travel and border crossings; an area which has tended to remain in the background of Mobilities research. The chapters included in this volume represent unique interdisciplinary understandings of the dual concepts of mobile language and border crossings, from crossings in virtual life and real life, to crossings in literature and translation, and finally to crossings in the semioscape of tourist guides and tourism signs. This book was originally published as a special issue of “Language and Intercultural Communication.”

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What If the Avant-Garde Were the Moral? On Early John Waters and the Future of Queer Culture

Though I love them all, my two favorite films by John Waters are two of his earlier works: Pink Flamingos and Female Trouble. Perhaps in the current cultural moment of bareback porn and kink on demand via myVidster, words like “transgressive” have lost their meaning or feel a bit retro, but in the context of the ’70s, boy, those films were simply that.

Divine, who was to John Waters what Kim Novak was to Alfred Hitchcock, was more drag anarchist than drag queen. She resisted the impulses that typically dictate how drag gets represented in mass culture — camp and glamor — and carved out a third way, a kind of pre-punk sensibility, that made those early performances so bad-ass.

With Female Trouble Waters introduced the world to cha-cha heels, in the magnificent scene where Dawn Davenport, Divine’s character, goes on a rampage after not receiving the shoes for Christmas. And no one depicts a rampage better than John Waters. No one. The scene with her parents in the living room is one of the best moments in cinema. If camp has a boundary, a wall, an outer limit, they reached it.

Waters does not offer lush, visually breathtaking shots where the camera lusts over its subject; his early guerrilla filmmaking resisted that. His camera is more a co-conspirator that’s in on his antics. Waters is a director of movement, especially when it came to Divine.

The thing you have to appreciate about Divine — and you absolutely must appreciate this — is how she opened a scene. Of course, there are performers of technique, actors who can master a dialect or immerse themselves fully into a character, or even actors who can quite simply exude a luminescent quality. But as Pauline Kael would suggest, to enter a scene, now that’s something that requires talent, one of the rarest, most fun, and most precious elements of an actor’s craft. And Divine could enter a room. She could open a scene. She could focus your attention skillfully.

And what of John Waters and his influence? In her Starbooty phase RuPaul definitely inhabited a persona with a Watersesque sensibility. I also can’t help but think that Lady Gaga is a John Waters invention. Had Divine lived a few more years, she would have worn that meat dress first.

From a political perspective, especially with regard to queerness, the children of Lorde and Foucault rule that roost. It makes me wish that my generation took up Waters and his work more, because the subversive energy of his early films provides not only a lens but a landscape that helps us think innovatively about the possibilities of not only queer politics but queer practice.

Though Mapplethorpe probably gets the most credit as the ultimate queer outsider artist of that era, we forget about John Waters, along with his spiritual sibling, the Italian queer director Pier Paolo Pasolini, both of whom introduced poop eating to movie audiences, Pasolini in Salo, the breathtaking and equally disturbing interpretation of de Sade’s 120 Days of Sodom, set against a backdrop of Italian Fascism, and John Waters in Pink Flamingos. His dominant sensibility, revealing the influence of Jean Genet, seeks to reconfigure the value system not merely to shock but to totally disorient, disembody and ultimately displace. What’s a more rewarding cinematic experience than total disembodiment? To watch those films is to enter a liminal space, with Divine the channel.

Waters is never quite cynical. Pink Flamingos and Female Trouble resist the apocalyptic, dystopian feel of some films when they try to enter into “edgy” territory. What’s more radical than challenging the normal is presenting the perverse, the bizarre, the odd as if they were normal. As Jon Caramanica suggests, “[t]he avant-garde need not be moral.” But what if it were?

I want to single out Female Trouble and Pink Flamingos because I think the films together signal a moment, a sensibility carried over. I mean, Waters plays with similar themes in different ways throughout his career, but the intensity and potency of those early films compels me to remain with them. I am especially interested in John Waters because in our post- or arguably post-post-marriage-equality moment, I wonder if we can find in those early works something of value that helps us imagine the future and the possibilities of not only queer politics but queer culture.
Arts – The Huffington Post
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Creating Mexican Consumer Culture in the Age of Porfirio Díaz

Creating Mexican Consumer Culture in the Age of Porfirio Díaz


In Gabriel García Márquez’s novel One Hundred Years of Solitude, a character articulates the fascination goods, technology, and modernity held for many Latin Americans in the early twentieth century when he declares that “incredible things are happening in this world.” The modernity he marvels over is the new availability of cheap and useful goods. Steven Bunker’s study shows how goods and consumption embodied modernity in the time of Porfirio Díaz, how they provided proof to Mexicans that “incredible things are happening in this world.”In urban areas, and especially Mexico City, being a consumer increasingly defined what it meant to be Mexican. In an effort to reconstruct everyday life in Porfirian Mexico, Bunker surveys the institutions and discourses of consumption and explores how individuals and groups used the goods, practices, and spaces of urban consumer culture to construct meaning and identities in the rapidly evolving social and physical landscape of the capital city and beyond. Through case studies of tobacco marketing, department stores, advertising, shoplifting, and a famous jewelry robbery and homicide, he provides a colorful walking tour of daily life in Porfirian Mexico City. Emphasizing the widespread participation in this consumer culture, Bunker’s work overturns conventional wisdom that only the middle and upper classes participated in this culture.

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Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture

Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture


Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture investigates the social symbolism and cultural poetics of dress in the ancient Roman world in the period from 200 BCE-400 CE. Editors Jonathan Edmondson and Alison Keith and the contributors to this volume explore the diffusion of Roman dress protocols at Rome and in the Roman imperial context by looking at Rome’s North African provinces in particular, a focus that previous studies have overlooked or dealt with only in passing. Another unique aspect of this collection is that it goes beyond the male elite to address a wider spectrum of Roman society. Chapters deal with such topics as masculine attire, strategies for self-expression for Roman women within a dress code prescribed by a patriarchal culture, and the complex dynamics of dress in imperial Roman culture, both literary and artistic. This volume further investigates the literary, legal, and iconographic evidence to provide anthropologically-informed readings of Roman clothing.This collection of original essays employs a range of methodological approaches – historical, literary critical, philological, art historical, sociological and anthropological – to offer a thorough discussion of one of the most central issues in Roman culture.

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