Kyrie in the Fourth, The Smart Effect and more musings from Boston’s streak

The league’s most unlikely streak lives on. As the cardiac Celtics embark on a quest for 17 straight wins, we look back on what has made the past 16 the talk of the NBA world.
www.espn.com – NBA

Luongo moves fourth all time with win 455

Roberto Luongo broke a tie with Curtis Joseph for fourth place on the NHL career victory list with win number 455.

on Yahoo! Sports – News, Scores, Standings, Rumors, Fantasy Games

DISCOUNT UPDATE:


Get Great Deals at Expedia!

Netflix, Prodigo Films Team for Fourth Brazilian Original Series, ‘Coisa Mais Linda’

Netflix’s push into original localized content in Latin America was bolstered today with the announcement that the streaming giant has secured the services of Brazil’s Prodigo Films to produce “Coisa Mais Linda,”(“So Beautiful”) a period romance set during Rio’s rich Bossa Nova movement of the late ’50s and early ’60s. The series will be the […]

Variety

SHOPPING DISCOUNT UPDATE:

LVMH Young Artisan Program Celebrates Fourth Year

SCHOOL IS IN: “Passion for craftsmanship can take you very far,” said Bernard Arnault, recalling Louis Vuitton’s rise from a “lone craftsman in his native Jura” who “thanks to his skills allowed us to now have the first luxury goods brand in the world” during the matriculation ceremony of the Institut des Métiers d’Excellence training program on Thursday.
The initiative, which launched in 2014, has grown from 28 students at its inception to 300 matriculating this year.
“What creates desire is product, and creation would not exist without the skills of the craftspeople who are behind the success of our houses,” said Chantal Gaemperle, LVMH’s group executive vice president, human resources and synergies.
Gaemperle insisted on the program’s focus on “work-training to practical, tangible, certifying, free and paid educational tracks” to “encourage employability” and also underlined the need for “training strategies to promote learning throughout one’s career,” to address the evolving needs of employees called upon to work longer. She found satisfaction in seeing apprenticeship restored to its former sterling reputation, she later added.
Among the new educational tracks offered this year, which now range from the CAP to master’s degrees, are a leathermaking course with Florence’s Polimoda design school, one in goldsmithing at

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWDWWD
Milanoo.com Ltd

Fourth of November Collaborates With New York Knicks on Capsule Collection

Kareem “Biggs” Burke continues to pull from his roots for his apparel endeavors.
The Roc-A-Fella records cofounder, who owns the denim brand Fourth of November, has teamed with the New York Knicks on a limited-edition capsule collection in celebration of the basketball team’s 70th anniversary.
“As a real New Yorker it’s an absolute honor to collaborate with the Knicks,” said Burke.
The collection includes a classic varsity jacket made of Melton wool and lambskin, and a snapback. Both feature the Fourth of November logo along with ’70 and ’73, which indicate the years the Knicks won an NBA Championship. The jacket, which retails for $ 350, and the snapback, which retails for $ 46, will be sold exclusively at the Madison Square Garden team store. Only 70 pieces of each style will be produced.
When working with Roc-A-Fella, which was acquired by Def Jam in 2004, Burke helped grow Rocawear, the label’s streetwear brand, into an almost $ 700 million business, and although he had no plans of reentering the fashion business, when a childhood friend introduced him to Fourth of November, which was founded by Carlos Rodriguez, he joined the team to help them grow the company. The line, which consists of denim and varsity jackets,

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWDWWD
Florsheim

Warriors rally in fourth for 2-0 series lead on Portland (Yahoo Sports)

OAKLAND, CA - MAY 3: Klay Thompson #11 of the Golden State Warriors shoots the ball during the game against the Portland Trail Blazers in Game Two of the Western Conference Semifinals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs on May 3, 2016 at ORACLE Arena in Oakland, California. (Photo by Garrett Ellwood/NBAE via Getty Images)

The defending champions mounted a remarkable comeback without MVP Stephen Curry. Klay Thompson scored 27 points and gave Golden State its first lead of the game on a 3-pointer with 5:33 left, and the Warriors rallied to beat the Portland Trail Blazers 110-99 on Tuesday night for a 2-0 lead in their Western Conference semifinal series. ”It started with how focused we were in that fourth,” Thompson said.



Yahoo Sports – Top News

DISCOUNT UPDATE:


Get Great Deals at Expedia!

Warriors rally in fourth for 2-0 series lead on Portland (Yahoo Sports)

OAKLAND, CA - MAY 3: Klay Thompson #11 of the Golden State Warriors shoots the ball during the game against the Portland Trail Blazers in Game Two of the Western Conference Semifinals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs on May 3, 2016 at ORACLE Arena in Oakland, California. (Photo by Garrett Ellwood/NBAE via Getty Images)

The defending champions mounted a remarkable comeback without MVP Stephen Curry. Klay Thompson scored 27 points and gave Golden State its first lead of the game on a 3-pointer with 5:33 left, and the Warriors rallied to beat the Portland Trail Blazers 110-99 on Tuesday night for a 2-0 lead in their Western Conference semifinal series. ”It started with how focused we were in that fourth,” Thompson said.



Yahoo Sports – Top News

DISCOUNT UPDATE:


Get Great Deals at Expedia!

The Letters of Horace Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford…

The Letters of Horace Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford…


New – This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 Excerpt: …nothing lasts now but the bad weather. I went two days ago, with Lady Ailesbury, and Mr. Conway, and Miss Anne, to hear the rehearsal of Mrs. Clive’s new farces, which is very droll, with very pretty music…. Yours ever, H. W. ‘He became Cofferer of the House-Clive’s benefit night (M

Price: $
Sold by Alibris UK: books, movies

15 Photos That Prove Taylor Swift Had the Best Fourth of July Weekend Ever

Taylor Swift's Fourth of July weekend > everyone else's Fourth of July weekend. Not totally surprising, given her past Independence Day celebrations. But this year might take the flag cake for being Swift's most epic…


All Entertainment
Call Now: 877-516-9953

Happy Fourth of July! Celebrate With 25+ Super Sales

shopping-bags

Before you start celebrating with Independence Day cookouts, fireworks, and the fixings, you might want to consider fitting in a quick retail fix. Stores and brands are offering deep discounts around summer’s biggest holiday!

Aldo: Indulge a shoe addiction by taking 50% off the original price of currently reduced styles.
Aritzia: Shop the sale section with reductions between 30 and 60%, plus free shipping when you spend over $ 100.
Bloomingdale’s: Browse the range of sale items, reduced between 20 and 65%.
Boohoo: Take 25% off everything right now. Come back on the Fourth for 30% off.
Calypso St. Barth: Now through Wednesday, get another 60% off sale items.
Cambridge Satchel Company: Expect 40% off certain items.
Chelsea Paris: Shoe lovers, get ready: take 25% off everything, Friday through Sunday, with code CPJULY4TH.
DL1961: Everything is reduced by 30% and certain styles by 60% with code DL4TH.
Easy Spirit: Browse the online sale, with prices starting at $ 30.
Echo Design: All ladies’ accessories will be discounted by 25%.
Joe Fresh: Score an extra 30% off clearance items from now until Sunday with code MELT30.
Joe’s Jeans: Find certain styles reduced by up to 50%.
Juicy Couture: Starting Thursday, get 50% off everything with code juicylovesusa.
Kate Spade New York: Sale items are reduced by another 25% through Tuesday with code SETSALE.
La Mer Collections: Pick a new watch and take 25% off, Thursday through Sunday, with code FREE25.
Lilly Pulitzer: On Friday only, grab a special gift online and in-store. You’ll receive a limited-edition beach towel for every $ 200 you spend.
Mackage: Certain spring pieces will be reduced by up to 50% online.
Marna Ro: Treat yourself to something chic and take 40% off any item via code MADEINAMERICA.
Michael Stars: Get an extra 30% off markdowns with code USA30. Shop through Monday.
Milly: Take 20% off sale with code HAPPY 4TH.
Nasty Gal: There’s a massive sale going on, with an extra 40% off markdowns. Access begins Thursday for the site, but you can shop the additional reduction via your phone now.
The Outnet: A selection of nearly 900 pieces will be reduced by a further 40%, discount applied at check-out.
Robert Lee Morris: All on-sale jewelry will be available for an extra 25% off.
Saks Fifth Avenue: The designer sale keeps getting better and better, with items now reduced by up to 70%.
Siwy: Refresh your cutoff collection and shop all denim for 25% off by using code USA2015.
Solid and Striped: If you’ve been eyeing a new swimsuit, do it now. You’ll get $ 25 off orders over $ 100 with code REDWHITEBLUE.
Skagen: Need a new watch? Shop a range reduced by 30%.
Stella & Bow: Shop everything for 30% off from Friday through Monday with code RedWhiteandBow.
Stuart Weitzman: There’s a major sale going on now, with styles up to 50% off.
Syllabus: Go crazy: The entire site is 50% off with code JULY50.
Three Dots: Until Sunday, take 25% off everything with code JULY4TH25 or an additional 40% off sale with JULY4TH40.
Treesje: Shop accessories at 25% off with code REDWHITE&BLUE.
Trina Turk: You’ll get another 20% off sale, plus 20% off certain full-price merchandise.
Triumph: Update your bras and undies and take an extra 30% off sale items.

Want More Style for the Long Weekend?
Denim Outfit Ideas for Days That Are Scorching
Exactly What to Pack for Your Weekend Trip Away
11 Summer Outfits, Starring the White Button-Down



Dressed
Shop Women’s Sales & Values at macys.com

Why Do We Shoot Off Fireworks on the Fourth of July?

2015-07-04-1436031910-2451245-4thJulyfireworksHP.gif

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Comedy – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Mobile Playboy today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

One Fart From Freedom on the Fourth of July

Fart. Poop. Underpants. I’m betting right now you’re chuckling. Or at least you have a smile on your face. Because according to any kid under five, those are some of the funniest words in the English language. And let’s face it, we all have a bit of “kid” left in us. Men probably more so than women.

Why, ask any mom with sons and invariably she’ll have a story about the night her boys told fart jokes at dinner, cracking themselves up so much that they started farting right then and there.

Women are a bit more subtle. We sometimes pretend that we don’t possess the bodily function of passing gas. But when someone accidentally cuts a tiny fart in public, we all giggle. Remember that scene with Miranda in the first Sex And The City movie?

I’ve never understood why these actions make people laugh. Perhaps because it’s an embarrassing situation and we tend to snicker when embarrassed. And never in a million years did I think that fecal matter would dominate my family’s conversation for days on end.

But it did.

It all started when my father became ill. Not to be too graphic, there was a miscommunication between the elimination systems in his body. We thought things were under control until suddenly, shit hit the fan — literally. The situation required a simple surgery. But operating on an 89-year-old man always involves some risk. Fortunately, it was a success.

And then there he was, several days later, lying in a hospital bed, surrounded by his entire family, waiting to be discharged. And waiting and waiting.

Because as everyone knows, you can’t leave the hospital until you perform two main functions: that of eating and that of pooping.

The eating part started with liquids, of which he consumed very little. After a few days, he graduated to that yummy hospital Jello. And then eventually on to the next stage — that of passing gas.

So, here there I was, telling my father that “gas is good.” Any kind. The “silent but deadly” type. The “loud as a rumbling train” variety. The “juicy fruity” sort. Just let it rip, I urged.

As did my sister, our kids, our husbands, my mother.

The days passed slowly with a little gas here and there. Which meant that surely, the poop was about to come.

By day ten, you could cut the tension that weaved itself into our family dynamics. We’re all very close and it was a beautiful hospital, as far as hospitals go. It offered fine cafeteria dining in an outdoor setting, Wifi, and an assortment of vending machines that only charged a little more than minimum wage for a few bottles of water. But too much togetherness can cause friction in the best of families.

What we needed was some good old farts to cut through the air. To release my father and to set our family back on the path to normalcy.

By day fifteen, we had met all the RNs, CNAs, orderlies, team doctors, administration personnel and cafeteria cashiers. The only place in the hospital that I didn’t visit was the gift shop. Although I was tempted to buy the “farting” pillow featured in the window.

And then it happened. On the Fourth of July, while fireworks lit up the sky, popping and crackling in the air, my dad’s internal organs opened up with explosives of their own. Our family cheers rivaled those of the partygoers on the street.

As promised, he was discharged from the hospital.

Life went back to normal, with one small difference. I now have a “fart” story of my own, should the need arise.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Comedy – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Mobile Playboy today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Americana for the Fourth of July

2015-07-03-1435888210-9393458-BumperJacksonsblog.jpg
Bumper Jacksons. Courtesy of Bumper Jacksons.

I’ve never been a huge fan of the category of “Americana” music. Don’t get me wrong, I like the music, it’s the category that seems made up to me. (In my day, we had folk, country, and blues! If we tried to do more than one people called us names and busted our 78s, which were made of glass because of the War! And we liked it that way!)

But seriously, if there’s a time to use the word Americana, it’s got to be July 4th, right? So here are some genre-bending releases that fit the name. I’ll start with Bumper Jacksons, who certainly range freely across genres; they call their music “roots jazz, country swing, street blues.” Their forthcoming CD, Too Big World, is nicely varied, tasteful, energetic, well played and sung…you can’t not like it. I’ve tried to not like it, because (full disclosure) they have beaten my band, Ocean, in the “traditional folk” category at the Washington Area Music Awards. Twice, not that I counted. And hey, we’re all winners just for being nominated (or whatever) so I’m not bitter. Heck, you can see what all the fuss is about for yourself, in the video below:


Bumper Jacksons performing “Take Me Back to Tulsa”

So anyway, take my advice and listen to Too Big World! You may come for the jazz: clarinet and horns and swingy rhythms, plus Billie Holliday and Duke Ellington classics. But you’ll stay for all the other ingredients in their mélange: fiddles and guitars, bouncy banjo-ukes, weepy country pedal steel, rock-and-roll electric guitar, jug-band kazoo and assorted percussion. You’ll enjoy their eclectic repertoire of Gold Rush laments (“The Dying Californian”), sad old-time love lyrics, (“Virginia Girls”), and Kentucky play-party songs (“Jubilee”), all neatly arranged and sweetly played. You’ll be charmed by the bohemian quality of their originals, which celebrate cups of joe (“Coffee Mama”), shattered dreams (“Adventure Story”) and even Washinton, D.C.’s Idle Time Books (“Pretty Mama Put a Spell on Me”). And since no Americana album is complete without Jesus and the Devil, this one features the gut-busting gospel of “Satan, Your Kingdom Must Come Down” and an infernally infectious tour of the afterlife called “Hell is Hot.” You mark my words, their hellacious devil music will make you get up and dance!

You can preview the album here. And check out another video below!


Bumper Jacksons: Corina, Corina

I may have spoken too soon about the Jesus and Devil thing, because there’s none of that on Grant Dermody’s latest album Sun Might Shine on Me, and his press material speaks a lot about Tibetan Buddhism. Dermody, a harmonica player who has worked with blues giants like John Cephas, Phil Wiggins, and Honeyboy Edwards, says that Buddhism and the Blues are both about diving underneath pain or hard times, so they don’t take you over; about feeling better, not feeling sad. On the new CD, his harmonica and voice lead an all-star ensemble including old-time and Cajun guitarist Dirk Powell, Louisiana Creole fiddler Cedric Watson, blues mandolinist Rich del Grosso, folk and blues guitarist Orville Johnson, and swamp-pop drummer Jockey Etienne. They’re all masters and their playing hangs together beautifully, creating perfect settings for Dermody’s harp and voice. His soulful harp work on classics like Skip James’s “Illinois Blues,” the traditional “When You Left,” and the original “Ain’t Going Back” reminds me of his mentor Phil Wiggins. His voice goes from a gravelly growl to a clear, tuneful croon — would it be sacrilege to say it reminds me in some places of Sinatra? My favorites include “Baby Please Don’t Go,” a song I’ve heard from tons of folks including Van Morrison and Them, Muddy Waters, Lightnin’ Hopkins, and Big Joe Williams; “Tree of Life,” an original instrumental that sounds like an Irish folk tune with blues touches; and the upbeat title track. I also love the traditional folk material, including the epic blues ballad “Boll Weevil,” a Creolized version of “Sail Away Ladies,” and an instrumental version of the Cajun lost love anthem “J’ai Passé Devant Ta Porte.” Dermody has a knack for feeling out the material and creating heartfelt settings, and his band and producers made it shine indeed. See the video below!


Orville Johnson, John Miller & Grant Dermody: Last Time Blues

Lately, a few intrepid performers have been reclaiming the old term “songster,” a category of singer-musician common in the 19th and 20th centuries. Largely but not entirely African-American, songsters were popular entertainers with a broad repertoire including blues, ballads, spirituals, parlor songs, dance tunes, and whatever else they could learn or write. Some were street-singers, vagabonds, or wanderers, but others were homebodies who played for their local folks in their own homes and communities. They were the Americana artists of their time, you might say. Famous songsters included Lead Belly and Gus Cannon (the wandering kind), as well as Mississippi John Hurt and Mance Lipscomb (the homebody kind). This new generation’s most famous songster is probably Dom Flemons, whom I discussed last time. But there are others, including Ben Hunter and Joe Seamons, whose album Take Yo Time expresses their philosophy: “Blues and folk songs do not need preserving — they are preserving us. Our mission is to spread the glory and whimsy of traditional song.” And so they do, with an engaging presentation on banjo, fiddle, guitar, and voice, of pieces from such varied sources as Barbecue Bob, Duke Ellington, and Clarence Ashley.

2015-07-03-1435902748-1849399-BenHunterJoeSeamons_0577_blog.jpg
Ben Hunter and Joe Seamons. Photo by Amber Zbitnoff. Courtesy of KEXP and Hunter & Seamons.

Memorable moments on Take Yo Time include the plaintive banjo and knee-percussion on “Some of These Days”; the dejected-sounding bent notes on “Broke Down Engine Blues”; and the defiantly unusual take on “Preachin’ Blues,” featuring just atmospheric fiddle, rhythmic banjo, and swooping vocals. I like a lot of their decisions: tasteful double-stopped fiddle opens their version of “Tom Dooley,” lending an almost Creole touch to the old North Carolina murder ballad; subtle bones-playing graces the Rev. Gary Davis piece “Banks of the River,” adding just the right seasoning; and the guitar and fiddle both playing on Big Bill Broonzy’s “Long Tall Mama” reminded me that Broonzy was a fiddler, too. I love how the duo’s similar takes on “Buck Rag,” another Gary Davis guitar piece, and “Beaumont Rag” the Bob Wills classic, underscore the common roots of our best traditional music, Western and Eastern, rural and urban, black and white. I especially like that these artistic decisions feel natural and serve the songs beautifully; they evoke strong meanings and invite contemplation, but at heart they’re instinctive moves brought about by love of the material. They indicate that, as Seamons and Hunter put it, “American roots music is our playground.” Long may these songsters play! See an extended performance in the video below.


Ben Hunter & Joe Seamons Live on KEXP, recorded August 19, 2014.

Devil in the Seat is the 8th album from veteran quartet The Foghorn Stringband, which is made up of Caleb Klauder (mandolin, fiddle, vocals) Stephen ‘Sammy’ Lind (fiddle, banjo, vocals) Reeb Willms (guitar, vocals) and Nadine Landry (upright bass, vocals). Hailing from the Northwest (two from Oregon and two from Yukon), they play rural music from all over the country, and even some from overseas. The fact that they have four strong singers, two men and two women, gives them a lot of arranging options, and they take advantage of this on Devil in the Seat. They perform “Mining Camp Blues” with dual yodeling women’s voices, and the English song “What Will We Do” in slightly edgier female harmonies than English divas Maddy Prior and June Tabor, from whom they learned it. On the other hand, they pull out tougher male harmonies on the crime-and-punishment ballad “John Hardy,” and use the contrast between male and female voices on “Longing for a Home” to suggest the universality of homelessness and loneliness. There’s some fun symmetry in certain of the songs too, from the thematic connection of “Columbus Stockade Blues” and the instrumental “Jailbreak” to the ghoulish balance of “Pretty Polly” and “Henry Lee,” respectively a “boy-kills-girl” and a “girl-kills-boy” ballad. Mostly, though, there’s the straightforward sound of powerful old-time sawing, plucking, strumming, and picking, in perfect synch and perfect harmony. It’s simple but effective, and more fun than a night in the still-house drinkin’ that cider! Watch a video below!


The Foghorn Stringband peforms “Columbus Stockade Blues”

I’ll end with a recommendation for the album Rugby, VA by Wayne and Max Henderson. Wayne Henderson is a world-renowned luthier as well as a master guitar player. He’s built guitars for Clapton and repaired them for Elvis. He’s also an old-time fingerpicking guitarist, and was awarded an NEA National Heritage Fellowship in 1995, the highest award given to a traditional artist. He even has a music festival named for him! Wayne originally learned to play chords from his older brother Max, who now suffers from memory loss and can’t play music anymore. But twenty years ago, with Wayne on guitar and Max on mandolin, they recorded a set of pure unadulterated string tunes, which remains the only known recording of the Henderson brothers. Although it’s got a few fiddle tunes, it’s interesting for being mostly instrumental versions of songs, such as “Banks of the Ohio,” “Will the Circle Be Unbroken,” “Wayfaring Stranger,” and “Cindy.” You won’t find a better or more authentic example of old-time music on guitar and mandolin. Released on the Music Maker Relief Foundation label, it will forever stand a great source of pure traditional music, and an enjoyable listen to boot. Watch a video about Wayne’s guitar career below.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

The Politics of the Fourth of July From Musical Theatre

2015-06-28-1435506582-3189850-1776three.jpg
As we approach the celebration of America’s 239th year of independence, Americans can learn about their revolutionary past from many sources, including an unexpected one: musical theatre.

The intersection between politics and musical theatre is small, indeed. One current anomaly is the hottest show in New York City, even though it does not open on Broadway until July 15. Hamilton, the creation of Lin-Manuel Miranda, opened to near-universal raves off-Broadway, and it relies on historian Ron Chernow’s important biography of Alexander Hamilton.

Some 46 years ago, another musical set in the eighteenth century opened to acclaim, capturing the Tony Award for best musical. Set primarily in Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, 1776 tells the story of the fateful weeks leading up to the writing and ratification of the Declaration of Independence by the Second Continental Congress. Given this thumbnail description, one might expect either a ponderous or puffed treatment of those tumultuous days.

Surprisingly, however, the show’s enduring popularity (it was also made into a film in 1972 with most of the original stage cast, including the estimable William Daniels in the starring role of John Adams) attests to the skill and dexterity of its authors. Yes, historical figures depicted on stage burst into song from time to time, and while that art form may turn aside some, those who accept the conceit — which is, after all, the conceit of all musical theatre — find real meat on the historical bones of this show.

(Disclaimer: I am both a political scientist who has written some on the founding period, and currently have a small role in Central New York’s Cortland Repertory Theatre company’s production of 1776. Fittingly, its final performance is July 4.)

The play’s representation of the central characters reflects their historical personas: for example, we learn at the outset that John Adams is “obnoxious and disliked,” as indeed he was. Maryland’s Samuel Chase was discourteously dubbed “bacon-face” by his congressional colleagues, owing to his girth and prodigious appetite. Rhode Island delegate Stephen Hopkins was a prodigious drinker, and so on.

Beyond this, however, the production includes extended discussions of the key issues at stake — many of which continue to bedevil the country today. Commander-in-Chief George Washington’s numerous gloomy dispatches about the abysmal condition of his military in the face of superior British forces were enough to “depress a hyena,” as Delaware’s Thomas McKean lamented. When Adams wails at the top of the show, “By God I have had this Congress!” it could just as easily be Barack Obama speaking in 2015.

During a scene when Declaration chief author Thomas Jefferson is defending the document to skeptical Pennsylvania delegate John Dickinson, who asserts that America lacks the right to rebel, Jefferson counters by citing British political thinker John Locke’s contract theory of governance (whose writing profoundly influenced Jefferson): “When a king becomes a tyrant he thereby breaks the contract binding his subjects to him.”

Income inequality and the privilege of wealth inflame passions when Dickinson defends the influence of wealthy elites in a nation of relative poverty. Congress’s President John Hancock notes that the body’s conservatives are unlikely to marshal much support in the country because “there are not enough men of property in America to dictate policy.” “Perhaps not,” Dickinson retorts, “but don’t forget that most men with nothing would rather protect the possibility of becoming rich than face the reality of being poor. And that is why they will follow us.” Koch brothers, anyone?

States’ rights and the relative balance of state versus national power sparks an exchange between delegates when South Carolina’s Edward Rutledge asks John Adams what the goal is beyond achieving independence. “We intend to become one nation,” Adams replies, to which Rutledge expresses his preference for “a nation of sovereign states, united for our mutual protection, but separate for our individual pursuits.” Preference for a weak national government finds expression in the nation’s first constitution, the Articles of Confederation (1777). Yet that document’s manifest weaknesses lead to its eclipse by the document of 1787, that far exceeded Rutledge’s call for a limited national government. Last week’s historic Supreme Court rulings on the Affordable Care Act and same sex marriage are but the most recent examples of the continuing struggle over federal versus state power.

Most centrally, the debate over the Declaration’s wording leads to the climactic moment in the show when the southern delegates walk out in protest of wording in the document condemning slavery. That near-rupture was staved off by the wording’s excision. Obviously, slavery would continue to cast its shadow over the country until the bloody Civil War finally ended the practice. As we know today, of course, it hardly ended the pall of fractured race relations which continue to rile our politics.

Finally, musical theatre is a distinctly American phenomenon. The mix of drama, historical text, humor and stirring music in 1776 gives a life to our past in a way that the likes of Ben Franklin might have appreciated, if not enjoyed.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Patriotic Clothes (That Aren’t Cheesy) To Wear This Fourth Of July

canva 2

Just like fireworks and hot dogs, festive clothing is essential for celebrating the Fourth of July. But let’s face it, Independence Day and fashion don’t exactly go hand in hand. You’re more likely to associate the holiday with cheesy graphic tees than a cute dress you might actually wear when the weekend is through.

Upon further investigation, though, it turns out that there are, in fact, ways to rock stars and stripes in style. In fact, with so many fashionable, affordable options to choose from, you’ll be all set for every day of the long weekend.

Just be careful with that mustard.


Follow Us On Pinterest
| Like Us On Facebook |
Follow Us On Twitter

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Style – The Huffington Post
FASHION NEWS UPDATE-Visit Shoe Deals Online today for the hottest deals online for shoes!

The Letters of Horace Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford…

The Letters of Horace Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford…


Used – This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 Excerpt: …nothing lasts now but the bad weather. I went two days ago, with Lady Ailesbury, and Mr. Conway, and Miss Anne, to hear the rehearsal of Mrs. Clive’s new farces, which is very droll, with very pretty music…. Yours ever, H. W. ‘He became Cofferer of the House-Clive’s benefit night (

Price: $
Sold by Alibris UK: books, movies

10 Signs It’s Time to End Your Relationship (in Honor of Independence Day on July Fourth)

Here, 10 signs it’s time to set yourself free and be single…




All Sex, Love & Life


‘Matangi’ Review: M.I.A.’s Fourth Album Delivers

— M.I.A, “Matangi” (Interscope)

Named after a ghetto Hindu goddess, M.I.A.’s fourth proper album pops with a relentless pounce and is filled with all the paradoxical imagery that the intro’s title “Karmageddon” conjures. On the call-to-arms title track she breaks it down as a tsunami of percussion mounts: “It’s so simple/Get to the floor.” Then sets it off simply by rhyming different places — “Gambia/Namibia/Bali/Mali/Chile/Malawi” — in her inimitable cadence.

But it’s never simple with M.I.A. because in her words she’s “Got a reputation/People see me as trouble.” She plays vocal acrobat on “Bring The Noize,” tabbing herself the “female Slick Rick” and unleashing spitfire bars like “Do you like my perfumes?/I made it at home with some gasoline and shrooms.” Her playful side rhymes “giddy up” with “light the city up” and boards Boeings eating bananas. On “atTENTion” she flips the syllable “tent” 50 different ways.

Production by Switch, Hit-Boy, Danja and The Partysquad is just as enigmatic. Take “Double Bubble Trouble” where a trap intro gives way to a Rastafari sway before hitting up the dancehall and riding out on a beat Omar Souleyman might floss over. On other tracks, The Weeknd samples, intermittent “ohmmms” and slinking woofers flit through stutter-step rhythms and furrowed bass. Picture fire alarms going off in Trinidadian clubs.

Songs like “Lights” and “Come Walk With Me” are nice encapsulations of the record’s split personality: part pop gold, part way out there. Even when M.I.A.’s feeling frisky it’s nowhere near a quiet storm. She’s either wondering “How come all this drama’s still trending?” or making “love like origami,” as guards set up outside.

At one point she mandates: “If you’re gonna be me you need a manifesto.” Based on the shrill stance here, hers might go something like this “Karmageddon line: “My words are my armor and you’re about to meet your karma.”
Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!