Unbuttoned: Woven Into the Fabrics of France

For the Paris fashion world, Notre-Dame and all it represents was a gravitational pole.
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France and Germany Step In to Circumvent Iran Sanctions

France and Germany have joined forces to rescue a European effort to create a payments channel to keep trade flowing with Iran, defying U.S. attempts to take the air out of the plan, senior diplomats said.
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EU legal advice: France can’t censor Google globally

France should not able to use EU laws to force Google to delete search results outside of the EU’s jurisdiction, according to one of the bloc’s most senior legal advisers.
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France Seeks Interim Leadership at Renault After Ghosn’s Arrest

France is moving to fill a power vacuum at car maker Renault after Chief Executive Carlos Ghosn was arrested in Japan on allegations of financial misconduct at Nissan, Renault’s Japanese partner.
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‘Made in France’ Brand Rue Begand Opens First Store

PARIS — One is in Troyes, a city in eastern France with a deep-rooted textile history. The other is located in the Haut Marais, a trendy shopping district in the center of Paris.
Rue Begand — the men’s fashion brand — has opened its first brick-and-mortar store on the Rue Charlot, after launching wholesale in January at L’Exception in France and United Arrows in Japan.
Doubling as the label’s headquarters, the shop sports a photo studio in its basement where the fall 2018 and spring 2019 collections were shot for the Rue Begand e-shop, set to launch in a couple of weeks.
Named after a street in Troyes that used to house a number of clothing workshops, the brand is a celebration of local savoir faire.
“Eighty percent of our clothes are made in Troyes,” said Rue Begand’s founder Samuel Granata, adding that the remaining part is manufactured in a nearby town, with a few of the more voluminous pieces being made in Tunisia.
Rue Begand works with L’Atelier d’Ariane, a historical clothing manufacturer based in Troyes run by Granata’s mother Véronique. “My family has had the atelier for over 20 years,” said the 25-year-old founder, who runs the brand with his brother Arthur. “I spent most of

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Antoni Porowski & Tan France Tease Next Level of "Queer Eye"

The Netflix hosts discuss moving to Kansas City for season 3, emotional vulnerability and normalizing the queer community for LGBTQ youths. Watch!
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Messe Frankfurt France to Introduce Leatherworld Paris

PARIS — Skins are in at Messe Frankfurt France, which is adding a new leather-focused section to its cluster of trade shows, scheduled to present at Le Bourget, Paris, from Sept. 17 to 20.
Dubbed Leatherworld Paris, the show will also include fake fur, accessories and synthetic alternatives to animal leather.
Participants will include Shanghai-based Ecopel, a major supplier of fake fur and imitation leather, as well as prime contractors from Pakistan and a range of leather goods makers and leather specialists from Lebanon and Turkey.
The move echoes that of competitor Première Vision Paris, which recently bulked up its Première Vision Leather salon. PV took over Cuir à Paris in 2014 and renamed it Première Vision Leather in February 2015, when it integrated all shows under the Première Vision Paris umbrella.
Gathering some 1,850 exhibitors, the group of Messe Frankfurt France shows, which already includes Apparel Sourcing, Avantex, Leatherworld, Shawls & Scarves, Texworld and Texworld Denim Paris, will also fall under a new banner “The Fairyland for Fashion.”
The event will include a range of workshops and roundtable discussions with technological, economic and sustainable themes.

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Looters on the Champs-Élysées Mar World Cup Celebrations in France

THE BLUES: France’s World Cup win wasn’t cause for celebration all round. With up to a million people flooding the Avenue des Champs-Élysées following France’s 4-2 win over Croatia in Moscow on Sunday, Publicis Drugstore, an iconic complex of eateries and shops located at the top of the avenue, was looted and vandalized. Riot police used water canons and tear gas to disperse the mob, according to local reports. The store was closed at the time.

The crowd celebrates on the Champs Elysees after the World Cup final match between France and Croatia. 
Francois Mori/AP/REX/Shutterstock

On Monday morning, a Publicis Drugstore employee who preferred to remain anonymous described the scene as “complete carnage.”
“They broke the windows using rocks and other objects. An enormous amount of merchandise was wrecked or stolen,” she said, adding that the store would remain closed for at least a day.
With the French national team – Les Bleus – due to parade on the avenue at 5 p.m. local time today, before heading to the Élysée Palace to meet with President Emmanuel Macron, retailers are girding themselves. A director at Gap’s Champs-Élysées flagship, who also spoke on condition of anonymity, said he had received a message from police advising stores and cafes

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France vs Croatia World Cup Live Stream: How to Watch

This one’s the big one. After a hard-fought tournament, it all comes to a close with the final battle featuring Croatia and France, the two best national soccer teams in the world. Still, the odds are against the underdog Croatian team. France is hellbent on earning its second World Cup crown in 20 years, while […]

Variety

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France has cruised, but don’t underestimate Croatia

France has been on cruise control at times in Russia, while Croatia has scrapped throughout. For that reason, the result is no forgone conclusion.
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Follow live: Uruguay, France kick off quarters

With Edinson Cavani likely out for Uruguay, Luis Suarez will have to shine vs. Killian Mbappe and France to see which team reaches the World Cup semis.

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Follow live: Mbappe leads France into matchup with Uruguay

Teenage phenom Kylian Mbappe, who scored twice in France’s round of 16 win over Argentina, takes center stage versus Luis Suarez and Uruguay.
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France vs. Argentina World Cup Live Stream: How to Watch

The highly anticipated France-Argentina game will mark the first time the two global soccer superstars have faced off in the elimination stages of a World Cup. While Argentina has the better record going in, with six wins to two, France has not ceded a World Cup match to a South American opponent since a 2-1 […]

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Follow live: Argentina face France to open Round of 16

Messi and Argentina find themselves trailing after Antoine Griezmann buried a penalty kick.
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Follow live: France, Denmark face off for Group C

Denmark tops the group with a win, while France, which has already qualified for the next round, needs at least a point to finish first.
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Mr Porter Hops the Channel With ‘Vive La France’ Project

PRET-A-PORTER: Mr Porter is ready to whistle “La Marseillaise” with plans to launch a collection of 14 French casualwear brands, including four newcomers to the site, Maison Labiche, De Bonne Facture, Husbands and Le Mont Saint Michel.
The Vive La France campaign and collection will make its debut on June 20 with plans to “offer a deeply established set of French brands, from the larger global-driven one to the small manufacturers focused on hand-craftsmanship. Each brings their own distinct flair and viewpoint to the overall exclusive collection,” said Fiona Firth, buying director at Mr Porter.

Mr Porter x Vive La France 
Courtesy Photo

The full offer will consist of 147 products across clothing, accessories and footwear, organized into four themes: Savoir-Faire, Parisian Street, Nouvelle Vague and Bleu de Travail.
The full list of brands includes AMI, Officine Générale, Hartford, Maison Kitsuné, Holiday Boileau, Arpenteur, J.M. Weston, Lacoste, Armor Lux, Bleu de Chauffe, Husbands, De Bonne Facture, Maison Labiche and Le Mont Saint-Michel.
Mr Porter, part of Yoox Net-a-porter Group, asked each brand to create a collection unique to its own idea of iconic French culture.
This isn’t the first time the e-retailer has spotlit key markets. In 2017 it unleashed a Made in California capsule collection that was a big success, prompting

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Rapha Releases a Series of Events in Anticipation of Tour de France

RIDE WITH ME: Rapha, the sportswear and lifestyle brand, has released its first brand campaign to promote cycling. A short film, produced in partnership with Mother LA, a Los Angeles-based production agency, will lead the campaign.
The film will highlight the many benefits of cycling such as improving personal health and reducing carbon emissions. To capture the spirit of cycling, behind-the-scenes footage and interviews will continue to be shown throughout the year.
Rapha’s campaign will be released a month before the Tour de France, the annual bicycle race, which starts on July 7. This year marks its 105 anniversary.
The campaign will run worldwide and it will be supported with events and ride programs including L’Etape du Tour training rides, Tour de France 101 and Bikepacking 101 classes across Rapha’s global clubhouse locations including London’s Soho and Spitalfields venues.
Since the launch of Rapha Cycling Club in 2015, the company has amassed over 7000 global members. In 2017, RZC Investments became Rapha’s major shareholder and they will continue to expand the company’s global reach, its product offering and strengthen its multichannel retail model.

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Subscription-Based VOD Nearly Doubles in France

Bolstered by Netflix, subscription-based VOD in France hit €173 million ($ 205 million) during the first nine months of 2017, nearly double that of the same period in 2016, while video-on-demand sales overall skyrocketed to €350 million ($ 415 million), a nearly 37% year-on-year increase, according to a new report. The report by GfK Consumer Choices and […]

Variety

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Toronto: ‘A Season in France’ Examines Immigrant Issues

A high-school teacher fleeing his war-torn African nation finds refuge in France, only to learn that the life he tries to build there is fraught with fear, uncertainty, and the traumas of the life he left behind. “A Season in France,” the new feature by acclaimed Chadian helmer Mahamat-Saleh Haroun, is a timely portrait of… Read more »

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This Tour de France Rider’s Tan Lines Are Definitely the Most Interesting Part of This Picture

And nothing else!

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Critic’s Notebook: In France, Melania Trump Flies the Fashion Flag of Friendship

A wardrobe in red, white and blue signified a new stage in the first lady’s relationship with political image making.
NYT > Fashion & Style

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Superdry Poised to Open Stand-alone Sport Stores Starting in France

SUPERDRY’S SPORT PUSH: SuperGroup has unveiled plans to expand Superdry’s activewear franchise by opening stand-alone sport stores, with the first one set for Grenoble, France. Four Superdry Sport stores are set to open before Christmas.
The news came as the company released its full-year financial results, with revenue climbing 27.4 percent to 752 million pounds in the year to April 29. Underlying profit before tax rose 18.4 percent to 87 million pounds million.
All figures have been converted at current exchange for the 12-month period.
As the ath-leisure trend continues to work its way into consumers wallets’, SuperGroup’s chief executive officer Euan Sutherland said the move was aimed at delivering long-term, sustainable growth and at further securing Superdry’s position as a global lifestyle brand.
He said the brand’s key marketing strategy is to provide customers with “a multichannel approach that balances a disciplined owned and franchised store opening program.”
The brand has been focusing on making its sports range more innovative and technical, and growing its women’s sports category to rival the men’s one. The brand said it also wants to optimize customers’ in-store experience through a more curated and refined selection of sports products.
The company declined to give further details about the openings or

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Paris pollution victim sues France for bad air

Parisian Clotilde Nonnez has lived in the capital for 30 years and has seen her health deteriorate.
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On the Runway: Brigitte Macron Inaugurates a New Look for France

Her powder-blue ensemble was a statement of independence and of support for her husband’s message.
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Netflix Considers Limited Theatrical Release in France for Cannes In-Competition Films

After facing pressure from distributors in recent weeks, Netflix is considering a limited theatrical release in France for its movies that are playing at the Cannes Film Festival. This marks the first year that Netflix has opened films at the prestigious film festival in the South of France. Two of its titles will be debuting… Read more »

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John Oliver Warns France: ‘Don’t ‘F**k Up’ And Elect A French Trump

John Oliver wants Americans to care about next week’s election in France because the fate of Europe may hang in the balance.

“That’s right,” Oliver said on Sunday’s “Last Week Tonight.” “The fate of Europe rests in the hands of a country that looks at snails and says, ‘I have got to get you in my mouth.’”

Oliver profiled several of the candidates, including Marine Le Pen, head of the right-wing National Front and a candidate some have compared to President Donald Trump

“She is the main reason you should be invested in this election,” Oliver told his U.S. audience. 

Like Trump, Le Pen is running on an anti-immigration platform. Oliver showed a clip of her comparing immigrants to people who move into your home, remove the wallpaper, “steal your wallet and brutalize your wife.”

“Hold on,” Oliver said. “Brutalizing your wife and stealing your wallet, again, that’s just boilerplate racism. But ‘people are coming to take my wallpaper’ is something a crazy person says. No one wants your wallpaper, you catastrophically weird person.” 

Oliver also compared Le Pen to Trump:  

“A potentially destabilizing populist campaigning on anti-immigrant rhetoric who rages against the elites despite having a powerful father and inherited wealth even as all the experts reassure us that there is no way this could possibly happen.”

Oliver then made a special appeal to the people of France.

Check it out above. 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Comedy – The Huffington Post
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France Awards Human Rights Prize to Copenhagen Summit’s Eva Kruse

COPENHAGEN — The French embassy in Denmark has awarded its Human Rights Prize to Eva Kruse, founder and chief executive officer of the Copenhagen Fashion Summit and former head of Copenhagen Fashion Week, for her work on sustainability in fashion and on promoting better working conditions in garment factories.
Kruse launched the Copenhagen Summit on sustainability in fashion on the margins of the United Nations’ “COP 15” climate change conference in 2009. Since then the biannual conferences have brought together fashion executives, humanitarian organizations, policy-makers and others to discuss ways to mobilize the international fashion industry to become more fair and environmentally sustainable.
In an early-morning reception at the French embassy during Copenhagen Fashion Week, Ambassador François Zimeray joked that the night had been short for many after an evening of fashion parties.
He pointed out that while the joy and frivolity of the fashion industry may seem opposed to the seriousness of human rights issues, both fields dealt with individual dignity and freedom of expressions.
“Wearing fashion says, ‘I am a person, I am an individual and I want to dialogue with the world,’” Zimeray said. “Fashion has to do with the dignity of the person, so it cannot work against the dignity of people [who work in the

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Kim robbery: 16 held in raids across France

Sixteen people have been arrested over the robbery of Kim Kardashian West, according to reports.
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Alex Morgan to play first half of 2017 in France (Yahoo Sports)

Why U.S. women's national team superstar Alex Morgan is moving to France

U.S. women’s national team star Alex Morgan announced that she will leave her NWSL club Orlando Pride to join Olympique Lyon.



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Pearl Izumi Elite LTD Country Short Sleeve Cycling Jersey – Men’s Size M Color France

Pearl Izumi Elite LTD Country Short Sleeve Cycling Jersey – Men’s Size M Color France


With the Pearl Izumi Elite LTD Country Short Sleeve Cycling Jersey for men, team-inspired construction and performance fabrics are combined with original Pearl Izumi sublimated graphics and Direct-Vent side panels for style, performance and comfort. ELITE Transfer fabric provides superior moisture transfer Direct-Vent panels provide superior ventilation Flatlock seams for layering comfort Full length zipper for venting Elasticized gripper on back to keep hem in place Three back pockets Reflective piping for low light visibility Sublimated graphics Now with added S/M and M/L sizes for a more personalized fit Fabric : Body: 100% polyester/UPF 40+; Mesh: 100% polyester/UPF 40+ Size M Color France
List Price: $ 109.95
Price: $ 67.07

What accounting rules did Germany, France and the Netherlands possess before they adopted IAS? (Germany, France and the Netherlands and their adoption of International Accounting Standards Book 2)

What accounting rules did Germany, France and the Netherlands possess before they adopted IAS? (Germany, France and the Netherlands and their adoption of International Accounting Standards Book 2)


Accounting Honours University Essay In 2000 the European Union decided that all EU listed companies would have to prepare their consolidated reports in accordance with the international accounting standards (IAS) of the International Accounting Standards Committee by 2005. In general, member states can govern themselves but the EU has the power to influence their self-governance. In 2000, after the EU decision, the accounting regulators of each member state were free to decide when they wanted to adopt IAS for their nation’s listed company consolidated reports, provided it was done by 2005. German, French and Dutch accounting regulators decided to adopt IAS for their nations’ listed company consolidated reports before the 2005 deadline (the Germans and French in 1998 and the Dutch in 2001). The purpose of this paper is to examine what Germany, France and the Netherlands possessed, in the way of accounting rules and regulations for their listed companies, before the decisions of their accounting regulators to adopt IAS for the consolidated reports of their listed companies. The motivation behind this purpose comes from the recent book entitled: International Accounting by Choi, F.D.S. & Meek, G.K. (2005). The book details the history behind the current accounting rules and regulations for the listed companies of the above three European nations. This paper aims to expand on the claims made in the book by Choi & Meek. The basic material from Choi & Meek is detailed in the paper, in a summarised form, and is added to with that from other academic sources. This paper also aims to contribute analysis to the material contained in it by presenting a comparison of the accounting rules and regulations in Germany, France and the Netherlands before their accounting regulators adopted IAS for their listed company consolidated reports. This paper will be based on secondary sources of information such as academic articles, research papers, accounting books and online journals.

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Shoes Children Drancy France 1945

Shoes Children Drancy France 1945


Original Archive Photo from the Commercial Appeal archive, originally filed under United Nations. Approximate size is inches. Photographer was not captured. Comes with a serialized Certificate of Authenticity.
List Price: $ 14.99
Price: $ 14.99

Possible lost Caravaggio painting found in attic in France

Auction officer Marc Labarbe presents the painting to the media in Paris, Tuesday, April 12, 2016. A 400-year-old painting that might have been executed by Italian master Caravaggio and could be worth more than 100 million euros has been found in an attic in Southern France.The picture, whose authenticity has not been established, had been left for more than 150 years in a property in the outskirts of Toulouse. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)PARIS (AP) — A 400-year-old picture that might have been painted by Italian master Caravaggio has been found in an attic in southern France.



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Diane Kruger Releases the Martell France 300 List

GOOD SPIRITS: Joseph Altuzarra, Patrick Demarchelier and Camille Rowe-Pourcheresse figure on this year’s Martell France 300 List, which ranks French and France-inspired talents in fashion, the arts, gastronomy, mixology and entertainment. The project was spearheaded by Diane Kruger, the cognac house’s ambassador.
“Having spent much of my time living in France and working with so many great talents, it is so wonderful to work on a project that gives people some well-deserved recognition and shows how they are having an impact on French culture on an international scale,” said Kruger, who was signed on by Martell in April to front the label during its tercentenary year.
Other fashion talents on the France 300 list include Garance Doré, Alix Petit, Constance Jablonski, Edouard Roschi, Fabrice Penot, Fabien Baron, François Nars, Julia Restoin Roitfeld and Pascale Mussart.
As part of the project, the spirits-maker conducted research globally on the influence of French lifestyle. Eighty-one percent of the 6,521 people surveyed in 10 markets said that French lifestyle has significantly influenced their own way of life. In fashion, the inspiring attributes were elegance, couture, jewelry, handbags and creative fashion.

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JEAN PIERRE LEAUD, MARIE FRANCE PISIER “Love On The Run”

JEAN PIERRE LEAUD, MARIE FRANCE PISIER “Love On The Run”


Vintage Photos Theater Photos Jean Pierre Leaud, Marie France Pisier Love Run
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Ghosthunter: A Journey Through Haunted France

Ghosthunter: A Journey Through Haunted France


Sir Simon Marsden is the kind of man you’d want around a campfire-his deep and resonant voice conveys the perfect combination of gallantry and intrigue that makes a good ghost story get under your skin. And what ghost stories he has In pursuit of his lifelong passion, he has traversed the globe capturing images of the supernatural in his signature, atmosphere-charged photographs. His latest work documents fifty haunted sites in France, from the burial place of Paris’s finest in the Pere Lachaise cemetery, to the Sun King’s Chateau de Versailles, and from the eerie abbey of the Mont St. Michel to the chateaux that dot the harsh landscape of the Pyrenees. France is rich in lore surrounding the Knights Templar, and Marsden has featured their stories prominently in this collection of indelible images. Each mysterious site has a tale behind it that is brought to life not only by Marsden’s spectacular photography but also by his narrative that is worthy of a suspense novel. The personal experiences of this spellbinding storyteller will inspire fellow ghosthunters and convince the staunchest skeptic to reconsider the supernatural world.

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Catholic Activism in South-West France, 1540-1570

Catholic Activism in South-West France, 1540-1570


Examining Catholic activism in the south-west of France during the middle decades of the sixteenth century, this book argues-contrary to prevailing views-that the phenomenon was both widespread and militant even before the formation of the Catholic League in 1576. By comparing and contrasting the successes and failures of activists in three key Catholic strongholds – Bordeaux, Toulouse and Agen – it is possible to come to a much fuller understanding of the means, methods and social make-up of organizations that attempted to rouse Catholic sentiment against the growing influence and power of the Huguenots.

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Smiles Mean Money in France, But Hidden Benefits Are Even More Enriching

“A person who smiles a lot is either a fool or an American.”
— Russian adage

The French government has launched a new  campaign  to make its citizens smile in an effort to promote a more welcoming environment for tourists. But science tells us that French authorities will be beating their heads against the wall if they really think they can coax aloof Parisians to put on a happy face.

Because, well, there’s no smiling in France.

Or so say psychologists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who have found that the most expressive nations —  those with citizens who are quickest to crack a smile – are those with heavy immigrant populations. That puts the homogeneous France near the bottom of the list with Russia and Japan. Among the leaders: Canada, Brazil and the good ol’ U.S.A.

So, what is it about living in the world’s melting pots that puts smiles on the faces of their citizenry? Simply put, a smile is the mother tongue. It bridges language barriers, predicts trust and signals friendly intentions among people of disparate origin.

And conversely, it is a lack of smiles, among other things, that has given France a reputation for being a difficult place to visit, especially if you don’t speak the language.

This isn’t the first time the French have tried to legislate smiles to convey warmth to tourists. The current effort is similar to campaigns in  2003  and 2009 , when the tourism board set up “smile ambassadors” at the nation’s most-visited spots. But by all accounts, the efforts of the police du sourire fell flat. Those smiles turned – or stayed – upside down.

What Happens to Our Brains When We Smile

There is fascinating research about the power of an upturned mouth. Smiling activates the release of neurotransmitters, including dopamine and serotonin, that help  fight off stress. Having  too little of these brain chemicals has been linked to depression. When we smile, we also trigger the release of “happy hormones,” including  endorphins, the same chemicals that give us that “runner’s high” after exercising. Even aping a smile can spark a feeling of  happiness  and  reduce stress. Charles Darwin was the first to suggest that one’s emotions could be enhanced by one’s expressions, positing that just the  act  of smiling produces positive emotion.

Fast forward more than 100 years and “positive emotion” leads off renowned positive psychologist Martin Seligman’s five-sided PERMA model of the traits that foster well-being. According to Seligman, there are two kinds of smiles, the “Duchenne smile” and the “Pan American” smile. The Duchenne smile (named for neurologist Guillaume Duchenne) is involuntary and genuine. It is a broad smile that forms wrinkles on the outer edges of the eyes (i.e. crow’s feet). On the other hand, the Pan Am smile (the forced smile of flight attendants from the long-defunct airline), is inauthentic. It involves only the muscles of the mouth. (To see if you can spot the fake from the real smile,  take this quiz  from the BBC.)

But back to our poker-faced friends around the world: In the UW-Madison study, researchers examined the psychology of smiling in 726 people from nine countries and compared the results for each country with its immigration numbers. Participants were asked what constituted a good reason to smile, with options like, “is a happy man,” “to sell you something,” or “feels inferior to you.”

The results? Countries with more immigration over the last 500 years were more likely to interpret the smile as a happy or friendly gesture.

In countries with less diverse pasts, such as France, Russia and Japan, the act of  smiling  is more complex. Japanese people will grin to  mask negative feelings. The Japanese tend to control their expression of emotion so much so that people there have been  given instruction in the art of the smile. Meanwhile, the French are so notorious for not smiling that the British tourism group VisitBritain released a guidebook with tips for U.K. hoteliers to avoid offending guests from other nations. “Don’t exchange a smile or make eye contact with anyone from France who you do not know,” the guidebook states.

But can we equate the act of smiling with true happiness? In a paper called “The French Unhappiness Puzzle,” economist Claudia Senik argues that France’s “cultural mentality” makes the French far less happy than their wealth and lifestyle would predict. Senik’s research suggests that French unhappiness is due in large part to “multi-dimensional” dissatisfaction and a low level of trust in other people. She says policies to address unhappiness in France should start in early childhood.

A smile, real or fake, is a good starting point, and the bigger the grin, the better. Researchers at  Wayne State University analyzed the smiles of 230 Major League Baseball players culled from their 1952 trading cards to test how positive emotions affect longevity. The intensity of the players’ smiles was compared with life data for the men, controlling for body mass index, education, career length and other factors. As it turned out, the players with the broadest smiles lived seven years longer.

The Big Picture

The UW-Madison researchers believe there are public policy implications that come with exposure to, and understanding of, diverse cultures living within the same borders. For example, said lead author Paula Niedenthal, citizens “may be more or less willing to pay for universal healthcare, because they empathize differently with in-group and out-group members.”

So let’s hope the French Smile Revolution is a winner this time around. It’ll build trust among tourists and natives alike, and lift moods all around. Personally, I hope the friendly efforts penetrate deeper than a superficial strategy aimed at fiscal gain, because we don’t have to excavate ancient history to see how the smile has been  used as a  propaganda  tool.

Here in the free world, I highly recommend smiling. And go all the way. You can fake it ’til you make it, but the Duchenne smile is a  more powerful mood changer  than the perfunctory one flashed at the Pan Am jet-setters.

Jason Powers, M.D., is chief medical officer at Promises Austin drug rehabilitation center and The Right Step network of addiction treatment programs in Texas. He is an addiction blogger and the pioneer of Positive Recovery, an approach to addiction treatment that helps people discover meaning and purpose in their lives.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
Special News Bulletin-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

The Secret Life of France

The Secret Life of France


Lucy Wadham’s first work of non-fiction is a candid and funny account of her long and tumultuous love affair with France, her adoptive land. At the age of eighteen Wadham ran away from English boys – who she found emotionally immature and sexually unconfident – and into the arms of a Frenchman. She soon discovered that romantic relationships in France were fraught with their own set of problems: not only do the French put women on a pedestal, but both sexes are required to act out the sort of seduction games that disappeared from English society centuries ago. Wadham, who dressed in Doc Martens and baggy jumpers, struggled to fit in. Twenty-five years later, having married in a French Catholic church, put her children through the French education system and divorced in a French court of law, Wadham examines the profound and varied differences between the Anglo-Saxon and French worldviews. Using her own experience, as a wife and mother, and later as an investigative journalist for the BBC, Wadham explores French attitudes towards sex, marriage, adultery, money, work, happiness, war and race, and in so doing reveals much about our own priorities and the nature of our identity. The Secret Life of France challenges our preconceptions and debunks many of the myths – bleak and rosy – on which our view of France rests. Might we have something to learn from this most infuriating and contrary neighbour?

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French Dirt: The Story of a Garden in the South of France

French Dirt: The Story of a Garden in the South of France


A story about dirt-and about sun, water, work, elation, and defeat. And about the sublime pleasure of having a little piece of French land all to oneself to till. Richard Goodman saw the ad in the paper: “SOUTHERN FRANCE: Stone house in Village near Nimes/Avignon/Uzes. 4 BR, 2 baths, fireplace, books, desk, bikes. Perfect for writing, painting, exploring & experiencing la France profonde. 0 mo. plus utilities.” And, with his girlfriend, he left New York City to spend a year in Southern France. The village was small-no shops, no gas station, no post office, only a café and a school. St. Sebastien de Caisson was home to farmers and vintners. Every evening Goodman watched the villagers congregate and longed to be a part of their camaraderie. But they weren’t interested in him: he was just another American, come to visit and soon to leave. So Goodman laced up his work boots and ventured out into the vineyards to work among them. He met them first as a hired worker, and then as a farmer of his own small plot of land. French Dirt is a love story between a man and his garden. It’s about plowing, planting, watering, and tending. It’s about cabbage, tomatoes, parsley, and eggplant. Most of all, it’s about the growing friendship between an American outsider and a close-knit community of French farmers. “There’s a genuine sweetness about the way the cucumbers and tomatoes bridge the divide of nationality.”-The New York Times Book Review “One of the most charming, perceptive and subtle books ever written about the French by an American.”-San Francisco Chronicle

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纳斯彩妆 NARS 三色眼影彩盘 – Douce France 4.6g/0.16oz

纳斯彩妆 NARS 三色眼影彩盘 – Douce France 4.6g/0.16oz


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Lonely Planet World Food France
Covers French cuisine for all occasions, including home cooking, celebrating and dining out; an exploration of the myriad regional…

Paris to Provence: Childhood Memories of Food & France
Paris to Provence is a culinary travelogue of separate summers spent in France, interweaving a collection of simple recipes with e…

Food Wine Burgundy (The Terroir Guides)
For decades, David Downie and Alison Harris have been exploring Burgundy—they walked clear across it in 2006—reporting on thei…

Tacx Real Life Video Climbs Collection IV – France

Tacx Real Life Video Climbs Collection IV – France


The Tacx Real Life Videos DVDs feature video footage matched with exact course resistance profile for a realistic riding experience.Works in conjunction with Tacx i-Magic (WT2020) and Tacx i-Magic Fortius (WT2021) virtual reality trainersUses slope and distance following famous roads throughout the worldShot in HD format and are compatabile with widescreen capable Tacx TTS software
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From France to India, Charlie Hebdo Reminds Us of the Real Promise of Free Speech

It took less than a day after the massacre of staffers, policemen, a visitor and a security guard at the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris for the discussion in India to swing back towards the need for “responsibility.”

Kiran Bedi, former senior police officer, now a prominent politician, tweeted just hours after the attack by masked gunmen that killed Charb, the editor at Charlie Hebdo, and many of his staff: “France Terror-Shoot-Out sends a message: why deliberately provoke or poke? Be respectful and civil. Don’t hurt people’s sensitivities!”

Even by the thick-skinned standards of contemporary Indian discourse, Bedi’s tweet was remarkably insensitive. But it was also undeniably representative of the way the Indian discussion on freedoms of expression has developed — or been choked off, depending on your perspective. That question, “why provoke?”, needs to be more closely examined, because it has strangled so much of Indian intellectual and cultural activity — and everyday life — for far too long.

In 2006, when the Danish cartoon controversy came to a head, many writers in India felt stampeded into one kind of response or another. To support the stance Charlie Hebdo took, republishing cartoons that carried images of the Prophet Muhammad that many Muslims found offensive, was to support the principle of free speech unhindered by the threats made by the religious.

But there was little space for those who wanted to say that they found the cartoons gratuitously offensive, did not endorse them personally, but felt that those who had drawn them and published them should not be persecuted or harmed in any case. I began following Charlie Hebdo’s work then, especially its provocative covers, which took on the Pope, Jesus, Jews, rabbis, French leaders, the Prophet Muhammad, the Boko Haram victims, Islam, Christianity, Judaism etc. I found its work childish and sometimes offensive, but I admired the magazine’s determination to offend all parties equally.

As I learned about the cases it had fought in the courts, my view of the Charlie Hebdo editorial team shifted: the cartoons might have been juvenile, but the team’s belief that free expression must accommodate all forms of satire, protest and parody was deeply serious, and embedded in a tradition of speaking rude, outrageous truth to power that went back centuries in France. Charlie Hebdo’s flaws, to me, were glaring and remainded worth analyzing: it had mocked Christianity and France’s politicians with a comfortable familiarity, but its mockery of Islam, African politics and even in one cartoon, India, were filled with stereotypes. As the writer Kamila Shamsie said on Twitter: “There are conversations to be had about the distinction between ‘offensive’ and ‘racist’. But the fanatics make it harder to have them.”

“I had thought of Charlie Hebdo with some envy. . . They had, I thought, been able to exercise a freedom that many Indians had not been able to claim.”

I respect the Charlie Hebdo team for one important thing: they really did believe that nothing was sacred, that everything human and every religion founded by humans was open to being satirized. They understood the danger of placing any institutions, political or religious, or any icons, gods, prophets, prime ministers, saints, leaders, beyond the reach of human mockery. If you say that the sacred should be respected, ask whether you really mean that gods, religions and their many interpreters “must” be respected. For between that well-intentioned “should respect” (a request) and that didactic “must” (a demand, often a threat) falls the shadow of tyranny, inquisitions, bullying mobs, fearful silence, blasphemy laws. And deadly execution-style massacres.



It might be hard to believe today, but in the eight years or so that preceded the day when gunmen went into its office, calling, “Where’s Charb? Where’s Charb?” before indiscriminately killing the editor and several staffers, I had thought of Charlie Hebdo with some envy. The staffers had gone to court and won their cases; two of France’s premiers had backed them on the right to continue being offensive in the same decade when we in India had lost the right to offend. They had been able to exercise a freedom that many Indians had not been able to claim.



Despite the threats made by Islamic groups against them, Charlie Hebdo had continued to publish, with the support of its community, its courts and even for the most part, its state. I thought it had found a way to work in relative safety, that it had escaped the always-present threats of violence that had silenced and diminished so many Indian artists, writers, filmmakers, liberals, journalists, rationalists, atheists, academics, scholars and publishers, muting some, turning some into exiles or pariahs, mutating many others into cowards. I thought that Charlie Hebdo’s staff had freedoms we could only imagine, but that was before the carnage in Paris.



pk aamir khan
(Poster of Aamir Khan in Bollywood film PK torn by activists of right wing organizations who accused Khan of hurting religious sentiments of the majority community and demanded a ban on the film)

The Trap of Decency

Why provoke when the price is so high, when the innocent could be and are caught in the crossfire? Why not just stick with art or opinions that are inoffensive? These questions have come up again and again in the Indian context, and elsewhere in the world. Charlie Hebdo’s cartoons raise a related question: do creators, artists, writers, opinion-makers need to be more responsible or more sensitive given the inflammable nature of the times, the legions of those looking for an excuse to perpetrate acts of violence?

In India, many are caught in one of two traps when they try to respond to the body of work produced by Charlie Hebdo.

The first is the trap of decency, even more powerful in a country where free expression is treated as a luxury good, to be bestowed as a treat when circumstances are favorable.

For far too many people, support for an artist or content creator is conflated with endorsement, and it is genuinely hard to understand why you might defend the right of someone to create work that you might dislike, be bored by, think in bad taste, or even consider offensive.

Decency demands — or used to, in a crowded and once-secular society — that we try not to offend others, that we adjust out of politeness. The idea that you might defend an essay by A.K. Ramanujan, a book by Salman Rushdie, a series of paintings by M.F. Husain, a film by Deepa Mehta or Aamir Khan, or an attempt by rationalist Sanal Edamaruku to debunk “miracles” on principle without necessarily agreeing with or liking their work is still an alien one. Free speech debates often veer into a discussion on content — why should x have chosen this subject, why should y have written in this particular way when they had other choices — and this tendency is particularly pronounced when people are personally uncomfortable with or offended by the content in question.

The second is the trap of fear, which leads to a belief in the value of appeasement.

The fear is usually the fear of violence that might be unleashed in an irrational, unpredictable manner by either committed groups of religious fundamentalists, as in Paris, or by political goons, as has been increasingly common in today’s India. It is this fear that makes many blame the victims of violent attacks, from the team at Charlie Hebdo and the two police officers murdered alongside, to artists and writers like Rushdie or the late Husain, for the violence visited upon them. Some blame the victims openly, suggesting that they had it coming and that they should have known better than to choose incendiary subjects.

Some use more subtle methods, suggesting that artists, too, have a responsibility to act with sensitivity, to rein their worst impulses in, to refrain from offending. Often, the real fear is that the artist or writer or journalist will bring threats, or escalating discomfort, or terrifying violence, rolling in the direction of others, will threaten the uneasy balance that still allows for a semblance of normalcy in India. Without this fine balance, the country might have to discard what is left — the holding of exhibitions and literary festivals, the publishing of books and magazines, the year-round university seminars and lectures.

In this scenario, publishers who pull back books, as Penguin India did so disgracefully with Wendy Doniger’s “The Hindus,” or agree to subject their books to a further process of review, as Orient Blackswan and Aleph have controversially done, are condemned only by a small section of liberals for caving in. Many others, including many writers, journalists and opinion-makers, see the compromises made as a pragmatic reaction to the pressures of the times. Many have argued that freedom of speech must be limited in India, that the creative and academic community must be prepared to sacrifice some rights for the sake of preserving the peace.

The problem with following a policy of appeasement is not just that this is ideologically dangerous, as the respected Indian historian and professor Romila Thapar pointed out in a blunt speech in late 2014:

“It is not that we are bereft of people who think autonomously and can ask relevant questions. But frequently where there should be voices, there is silence. Are we all being co-opted too easily by the comforts of conforming? Are we fearful of the retribution that questioning may and often does bring?”

Why was there so little reaction among academics and professionals, Prof. Thapar wanted to know, to the banning and pulping of books, the changing of educational syllabuses, the questioning of the actions of several organizations that act in the name of religion, if not in conformity with religious values?

Appeasement becomes a habit, and then so does silence, and the avoidance of difficult questions. The anger that could not be safely expressed by many for fear of reprisal, against, say, either Rushdie’s Islamic fundamentalist persecutors, or M.F. Husain’s Hindu right wing detractors, turns in another direction. In India, that anger is often directed at the victims — why did they have to provoke, did they not know what response they would get, and crucially, do they not see the trouble they might get everyone else into?

“It is easier to believe that a massacre was the victim’s fault, than to accept that one’s own comfort and safety depend almost entirely on not attracting the attention of fundamentalists, terrorists, thugs or the private armies controlled by corrupt and violent politicians.”

That anger, born of fear and powerlessness, is justified in many ways — personal attacks against the character of the victims, an airing of one’s own discomfort with the content under discussion. Often in FoE crises, victims are blamed, as in domestic violence or sexual assault cases, for the violence visited on them, in eerily similar rhetorical terms. It is easier to believe that a massacre was the victim’s fault, than to accept that one’s own comfort and safety depend almost entirely on not attracting the attention of fundamentalists, terrorists, thugs or the private armies controlled by corrupt and violent politicians.



This is how the artist M.F. Husain was exiled, the author U.R. Ananthamurthy hounded before his death last year, and Rushdie made to feel increasingly unwelcome in his own country. Dislike is useful; it allows people to step away from both their fear and their dismay at being unable to protect the books, art, conversations, and free spaces that they were once able to claim. And yet none of these gestures of appeasement have been effective in stemming the rise of hate speech across religious or political groups in India — in fact, the relative suppression of more moderate voices has in effect handed over the loudspeakers and the mikes to the bullies and the bigots.



salman rushdie
(Indian born British writer Salman Rushdie)

The Price of Not Offending

It is only when you stop sifting through the content, looking for possible flaws of taste or insensitivity, and stop interrogating the creative community over the purity of their intentions that you can move to more useful ground: the question of principle.

The right to offend was only one part of the principles that the team at Charlie Hebdo lived (and died) by; the other part was the principle that has most sharply divided humanity in this century, ie, the idea that all of us have an absolute right to question religion. This is where the argument that Charlie Hebdo could have somehow avoided the terror attacks by being a little less offensive or a little more sensitive falls apart.

In August 2014, Bangladeshi TV host Nurul Islam Faruqi, was visited by five men at his home in Dhaka; they tied up his family and slit his throat. Faruqi used to host religious programs, and was an imam himself. His crime was not that he used offensive or insensitive speech — he was murdered for speaking out against superstition and for his criticism of Islamic fundamentalism.

A year before Faruqi’s murder, the rationalist Narendra Dabholkar had been killed in August 2013 in India, by two unidentified gunmen. Dabholkar was not someone whose speech was either incendiary or deliberately offensive. But his work on bringing in anti-superstition laws had been strongly opposed by some members of the BJP and the far-right regional party, the Shiv Sena, which claimed that an anti-superstition/ black magic law would adversely affect Hindu culture.

Nor was Sanal Edamaruku, president of the Indian Rationalist Association, being disrespectful or offensive when he did his many exposes of “holy men” and their fake miracles. And yet in 2012, when he exposed the phenomenon of holy water apparently dripping from the toe of a statue of Christ as a consequence of bad plumbing, he faced a barrage of hate speech cases and escalating threats. Edamaruku now lives in Finland, not by choice, but out of necessity — it is not safe for him to come back home.

Responsibility cuts both ways. It is true that you cannot reason with a fundamentalist, of any religion, that there is no rational argument to be had with armed men bent on murder. But civil society and religious organizations have their responsibilities, too, and one of them is to enable and support those who want the freedom to question, to create, to debunk, and yes, even to mock. It must be kept in mind that what the team at Charlie Hebdo died for was not just the right to offend, but also the right to challenge and question everything — including religion, including Islam.

The promise of free speech goes far beyond the schoolboy thrill of being able to offend; the real promise of free speech is that we all hope to live uncensored lives, free to create in peace, and free to ask questions of or satirize the leaders, and the institutions, that run our everyday lives.

Why provoke, why defend those who are deliberately provocative? Because the bullies and the men with guns are at one extreme, and the Charlie Hebdos of this world — offensive, irreverent, deliberately pushing the boundaries of satire — are at the other. It is not necessary to follow in Charlie Hebdo’s footsteps in order to respect, or mourn the team. But if we want to live lives that are not muffled, censored and fearful, we must learn to give those who do provoke our support. If we don’t, the trammelled freedoms we have left will shrink even further.
Arts – The Huffington Post
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Words in a French Life : Lessons in Love and Language from the South of France

Words in a French Life : Lessons in Love and Language from the South of France


Buy Words in a French Life by Kristin Espinasse in Paperback for the low price of 12.59. Find this product in Travel > Europe – France, Essays & Travelogues.
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Starlite Kids France Flag Hooded Sweatshirt Printed On Russell Jerzees Schoolgear Childrens Top (Grey Marl) (3-4 Years)

Starlite Kids France Flag Hooded Sweatshirt Printed On Russell Jerzees Schoolgear Childrens Top (Grey Marl) (3-4 Years)


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Oakley Elevate Marie France Goggle

Oakley Elevate Marie France Goggle


Marie-France Roy Signature Series Elevate Snow Goggle This is the calm before you storm the mountain, and you’ve got a decision to make. What’s the best goggle for you? Before you read about all the performance of Oakley Elevate(R), wrap your head around one key aspect: comfort. This snow goggle is optimized for small to medium size faces, and we poured every technology we could into the fit. That’s why both male and female pros of winter sports are calling it their own. The right fit isn’t just about comfort. It’s about the safety of being free of distraction, and that’s the difference between throwing down a great run and being thrown down a great run. Elevate conforms to your face with a flexible O Matter(R) chassis and strap “outriggers” that balance pressure. You don’t have to over-tighten it like ordinary goggles. We lined the contact surface with triple-layer polar fleece foam that wicks away moisture, and we added some brilliance to the architecture: an internal skeletal support system that minimizes nasal pressure and balances contact forces along critical zones. Translation: You’ll have all the airflow you need to feed your lungs, plus comfort that makes you wonder why you ever wasted a single snow day on ordinary goggles. Elevate utilizes a dual vented lens to fight fog, and we added premium F3 anti-fog technology. The peripheral view is wide and crisp, and the pure Plutonite(R) lens stops every single ray of UV that bombards the highlands. That includes UVA, UVB and UVC, as well as harmful blue light up to 400nm. Choose an optional Iridium(R) lens coating to balance light transmission and make the most of your session. Optimized to fit small to medium faces Internal skeletal support system to minimize nasal pressure and maximize airflow Flexible O Matter(R) chassis that conforms to your face Balanced fit (with or without helmet) via fixed O Matter(R) strap outriggers All-day comfort of moisture wicking triple-layer polar fleece foam Fog elimination of dual vented lens with F3 anti-fog technology Protection of Plutonite(R) lens material that filters out 100% of all UV Tuned light transmission of Iridium(R) lens coating (optional) Metal icon accent
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The Musical Legacy of Wartime France

The Musical Legacy of Wartime France


For the three forces competing for political authority in France during World War II, music became the site of a cultural battle that reflected the war itself. German occupying authorities promoted German music at the expense of French, while the Vichy administration pursued projects of national renewal through culture. Meanwhile, Resistance networks gradually formed to combat German propaganda while eyeing Vichy’s efforts with suspicion. In The Musical Legacy of Wartime France, Leslie A. Sprout explores how each of these forces influenced the composition, performance, and reception of five well-known works: the secret Resistance songs of Francis Poulenc and those of Arthur Honegger; Olivier Messiaen’s Quartet for the End of Time, composed in a German prisoner of war camp; Maurice Durufle’s Requiem, one of sixty-five pieces commissioned by Vichy between 1940 and 1944; and Igor Stravinsky’s Danses concertantes, which was met at its 1945 Paris premiere with protests that prefigured the aesthetic debates of the early Cold War. Sprout examines not only how these pieces were created and disseminated during and just after the war, but also how and why we still associate these pieces with the stories we tell – in textbooks, program notes, liner notes, historical monographs, and biographies – about music, France, and World War II.

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A Motor-flight Through France

A Motor-flight Through France


Freed from the dependency upon the timetables and routes of the railway, the early years of the 20th century were a golden age for motorists. This book describes three of Wharton’s journeys in this era, travelling in a chauffeur-driven Panhard with servants and luggage sent on ahead. The journeys are: a three-week run from Boulogne to Clermont-Ferrand to Paris in May 1906; a circuit of the South-West, the Pyrenees and the Rhone Valley in March-April 1907, accompanied by Henry James; and a short weekend in Picardy in 1907. Wharton wrote of her ‘flights’ for the ‘Atlantic Monthly’ and collected them into the present volume, which was first published in 1908.

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History of Computing in Education: Ifip 18th World Computer Conigress Tc3 / Tc9 1st Conference on the History of Computing in Education 22 – 27 August 2004 Toulouse, France

History of Computing in Education: Ifip 18th World Computer Conigress Tc3 / Tc9 1st Conference on the History of Computing in Education 22 – 27 August 2004 Toulouse, France


This book looks at the history of computing in education from two points of view as a history of the impact of computing on education over the past forty years and as the use of the history of computing as a pedagogical tool in computing education. These two intertwined views look back at computer education and the ways in which organizations have attempted to use computers to enhance teaching and learning from elementary education through university studies in several countries. Topics include: considerations of cybernetics and informatics; government sponsored open source software for school education; learning with the artificial sciences; technology leading to historic changes; ICT in Catalan schools; streams in the history of computer education in Australia; growth of computing technology for education in India; computing and education in the UK; evolution of e-inclusion for the disabled; educational hypermedia computing; keyboard training; studies of educational computing projects; and using computing history to enhance teaching. History of Computing in Education is unique in its topic, the field having not been the subject of extensive study in the past. While there have been several books on the history of computing, a study of the impact of computing on education is only now receiving due attention. This book derives from contributions made at the History of Computing in Education conference at the IFIP 18th World Computer Congress, held in August 2004 in Toulouse, France and sponsored by the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP). Teachers, students, researchers, authors, and education developers should find this work as a welcome addition to their educational repertoire. It will also provide new dimensions of breadth and depth in the evolution of computing in education.

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