How the Humble Fleece Jacket Became High Fashion

Polar fleece, the practical fabric of choice for rock climbers and hikers, has been co-opted by luxury brands.
WSJ.com: Lifestyle

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In a Texas Art Mecca, Humble Adobe Now Carries a High Cost

In Marfa, Tex., officials have raised taxes on adobe homes, pinching upscale homeowners as well as lower-income families who have lived there for decades.
NYT > Arts

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The Best Bosses Are Humble Bosses

Organizations are making a push to hire and promote workers who lead effectively but don’t seek the spotlight.
WSJ.com: Lifestyle

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Books of The Times: In ‘The Mirage Factory,’ a Thriving Los Angeles Born From Humble Beginnings

Gary Krist tells the story of the city through the lives of three people whose restlessness and ambition transformed it in the early decades of the 20th century.
NYT > Books

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Ethan Hawke on How He Survived 11 Sundance Fests: ‘You Have to Be Strong and Humble’

In 1991, 21-year-old Ethan Hawke was shivering in the woods of Park City, Utah, playing a sergeant in the small World War II drama “A Midnight Clear,” when thousands of people suddenly invaded town. “That was the first time I’d ever heard of the Sundance Film Festival,” says Hawke today. “I thought, ‘Aw, this will […]

Variety

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Pope Francis Warns Leaders to Be Humble in Surprise TED Talk from Vatican City: ‘Your Power Will Ruin You’

Pope Francis promoted humility and warned of the dangers of too much power in a sobering TED Talk delivered straight from Vatican City.

In his recorded TED Talk shown on Tuesday at TED’s international conference in Vancouver, the 80-year-old spoke out about compassion and caring for others, but also used the opportunity to warn arrogant leaders.

“Please, allow me to say it loud and clear,” he began. “The more powerful you are, the more your actions will have an impact on people, the more responsible you are to act humbly. If you don’t, your power will ruin you, and you will ruin the other.”

 

The remarks come about a week after White House press secretary Sean Spicer said at a press briefing that Donald Trump would “be honored” to meet the Pope. Although the president and the pontiff haven’t seen eye to eye in the past, Archbishop Angelo Becciu told the Italian news agency ANSA that “Pope Francis is always ready to receive heads of state who request an audience.”

The Pope drew on his own family’s circumstances when encouraging listeners to care for the needy. He said he often wonders how his grandparents, migrants from Italy who moved to Argentina, would have done in today’s “culture of waste.”

“I could have very well ended up among today’s ‘discarded’ people. And that’s why I always ask myself, deep in my heart: ‘Why them and not me?’ ” he said.

Pope Francis Throws a Pizza Party for 1,500 Homeless People to Honor Mother Teresa

It took more than a year for TED officials to convince the Pope to participate in the conference, CNN reports. And Bruno Giussani, the TED international curator who organized the Pope’s talk, hailed His Holiness as the “only moral voice” capable of reaching people across boundaries.

In his nearly 18-minute address, the Pope declared: “A single individual is enough for hope to exist, and that individual can be you. And then there will be another ‘you,’ and another ‘you,’ and it turns into an ‘us.’ And so, does hope begin when we have an ‘us?’ No. Hope began with one ‘you.’ When there is an ‘us,’ there begins a revolution.”


PEOPLE.com

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Why the Humble Push-Up Could Be the Key to the Body You Want

It turned Jake Gyllenhaal into a prize fighter, and it can do the same for you.

Lifestyle – Esquire

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Heart Gift 8: Our Humble Little Bricks: A letter from 1953

My Heart Gift today is one of my favorite letters from my father. It is a letter that he wrote to his step-father, from Turkey in 1953-63 years ago. Aged just 23 at the time of writing, his words are poetic, profound and as relevant today as they were in 1953. The letter was published in his book, The Unbeaten Track in 1970. I include his description before the letter as I think it is a beautiful example of my father’s word alchemy. I hope you enjoy it!

“A fortnight later, rucksack on my back, I had hitch-hiked right across Europe and into central Turkey. A letter from home awaited me in the little town of Kayseri, the Caesarea of antiquity. I stopped there for a couple of days, putting up, by invitation of the headmaster, at the local college, empty for the summer vacation. There I started a friendship with Orhan, a student who still remained in the college waiting for his parents to come from Istanbul before joining them in their native village close by. ‘Why don’t you come along with me?’ Orhan said, ‘and see life in a Turkish village?’

It was from that village that I re-read Tadeusz’s letter. ‘What in hell draws you to these countries?’ he wrote. ‘Are you still as keen about it, or have the poverty and primitive conditions cooled you off a bit by now?’ The evening light was failing, as I sat in the porch of my host’s modest cottage, and smiled to myself. The village square was deep in fine dust. Chickens scratched around in the animal droppings for food; a flock of ducks came wobbling across the square hustled home by a ten-year-old in baggy trousers with missing fly-buttons, his round chubby face in striking contrast to his oversized cap. He whistled sharply, raising his stick towards the laggards who were trying to dispute the droppings with the chicken, and shouted gaily ‘burda, burda!’ (‘this way!).

Now a herd of cattle ambled to their sheds, trailing dust, lowing softly, the resonance of their bells mingling with long- drawn shepherd calls which the hushed clear air seemed to hold for ever, so that they lingered lazily like the dancing dust that tarried over the square. Last of all the bullock-carts lumbered in, ponderous on their spokeless wheels of solid wood, their axles whining and complaining with a note of ever-changing pitch.

Lost in thought, I didn’t notice Orhan, who had brought a hurricane lamp and a dish of sour milk. ‘There!’ he smiled, ‘you can’t write home in the dark. The night falls fast here. Eat this soon, or it’ll be swimming with gnats.’ ‘Tashakur’ (‘thank you!’), I grinned back at him, ‘I wish my Turkish were half as good as your English!’

‘You ask me if I like it here,’ I wrote. ‘Oh yes, intensely, but how can I explain? It’s a bit like meeting a girl, when everything clicks, and you fall in love. I feel gloriously alive and very much at home, almost as if I were regaining a homeland. But probing more deeply what can I say? You have to feel it and to live it. These lands suckled the earliest civilizations, nurtured the first roots of man’s timid gropings towards the tree that we are now. Beneath the outward poverty, under the grime and the tatters there is a culture as time itself, infinitely complex and wise. These weathered lands hold out the corrective to our brave new world, of the sobriety of age and experience, of diversity in life’s options: especially to those seeking to apprehend the ultimates and the quiddity within the ebb and flow of appearance. To me this last is particularly appealing: the directness and immediacy between man and his natural environment.

At the same time there is so much need here, so much wretchedness that could be remedied. The challenge is enormous. The poverty is crushing, perhaps less so here in Turkey than in other parts of Asia, a poverty often aggravated by the former exploitation by European colonial powers. I believe everybody in the West should be aware of this and its profound consequences for all of us. Help and alleviation of this wretchedness can come essentially from a better understanding of its causes, nature and extent, and in this every one of us can help, can contribute his humble little brick.

I daresay this may not answer your questions very satisfactorily, for it is written in the heat of the moment, real no less than for it is figurative – 96°F in the shade!”

* Heart Gift is a community of people who give from their hearts. You are invited to join to be inspired and, when ready, to share your favorite quote, letter, joke, prayer, advice, music, art piece, story, song, ritual, Grandma’s recipe – anything. We can all help create a more beautiful world when we are Permissionaries – giving each other permission to be authentic, vulnerable and heart led.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
Special News Bulletin-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

Humble Plumber Wins $136 Million Lottery, Still Wants To Continue Working

NEW YORK (AP) — A Staten Island plumber who won a $ 136 million Powerball jackpot said Thursday he wants to keep working — but also plans to “relax a little more.”

Anthony Perosi, 56, left his March 14 ticket pinned to the wall behind a basement pipe for six weeks.

anthony perosi
The winner, Anthony Perosi, on right, and his son, Anthony Perosi III.

A friend had told him where the winning ticket had been purchased, but she thought a teacher had won. So he took his time checking the numbers, which he’d chosen randomly.

“When I saw all the numbers matched up, I panicked,” Perosi said. “I immediately called my son and asked him to come over right away!”

Anthony Perosi III did what he was told.

“I couldn’t believe what I was seeing,” said the 27-year-old. “I checked the numbers on my phone and it has been surreal ever since.”

The cash value of the ticket came to $ 88.5 million. The father decided to share his winnings with his son, split 70-30. So dad gets a net lump sum of $ 38.6 million after required withholdings, and son pockets $ 16.5 million.

“I honestly don’t know what my plans are right now,” said the elder Perosi. “I want to continue to work, but will be able to relax a little more and not have any worries financially.”

“I don’t have words for it,” said the son. “It’s just unbelievable and a big relief; like a big weight is off my shoulders. I’ll probably pay some bills, take a vacation, and then really take some time to think and plan for the future.”

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— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
Special News Bulletin-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

Research Confirms That Humble Bragging Doesn’t Work, It’s Just Really Annoying

Before you share the news about your recent job promotion on Facebook, consider this: Researchers have found that a little humble-bragging can backfire. In other words, your false modesty is pretty transparent, and people detest you for it.

The difference between a humble brag and a traditional brag is the way in which a person presents her accomplishment. Two tweets for clarity:

Humble brag:

Standard brag:

The humble brag attempts to obscure the fact that Ms. Swift has a custom designer dress for a big celebrity event by sharing a “relatable” detail about her unruly cat. The standard brag states, outright, an accomplishment.

The study, which comes from researchers at City University London, Carnegie Mellon University and Bocconi University and was published in Psychological Science, reveals that humble-braggers misread the affects of their self-promotion: They overestimate positive responses and emotions and underestimate negatives ones.

“Most people probably realize that they experience emotions other than pure joy when they are on the receiving end of someone else’s self-promotion. Yet, when we engage in self-promotion ourselves, we tend to overestimate others’ positive reactions and underestimate their negative ones,” says Irene Scopelliti, the study’s lead and a lecturer in marketing at City University London. She says the impact of self-promotion may be exacerbated by social media, where there’s a greater distance between the news-sharer and the recipient.

Self-promoters’ objection may be to make a good impression, but this often backfires. Researchers performed two different experiments to gauge the boaster’s misperception when it came to how his or her message was received. In the first, Scopelliti told The Huffington Post, half of the participants were asked to describe a case in which they had bragged to someone else. They were then told to describe the emotions they felt and the emotions the thought the recipient felt. The other participants were told to describe an instance where someone had bragged to them, how they felt and how they believed the braggart felt. “We coded the emotions indicated and observed that the braggers thought their recipients experienced far more positive emotions, and far less negative emotions, than recipients did,” Scopelliti said.

The second study asked participants to, again, describe a situation where they bragged to someone else or someone else bragged about them. The same results occurred: self-promoters miscalculated the extent to which recipients were happy for them and proud of them, and underestimated the extent to which recipients were annoyed by them. “We attribute this miscalibration to a phenomenon called the ‘empathy gap’: both parties, self-promoters and recipients, have trouble imagining how they would feel if they roles were reversed,” Scopelliti said.

A third, separate experiment was to test emotions connected to online bragging. The researchers gauged reactions to online profiles, some of which were much more self-promotional than others. Their findings revealed that those on the receiving end of a show-off sentence or Facebook status perceive excessive self-promoters as unlikable and as braggarts. Despite the profile creator’s thinking, self-promoting details did not impress readers — their intentions actually backfired. Their self-promotion decreased readers positive perceptions of the person who they were reading about.

“These results are particularly important in the Internet age, when opportunities for self-promotion have proliferated via social networking,” Scopelliti said. “The emotional miscalibration that we observe may indeed be exacerbated by the additional distance between people sharing information and their recipients, which can both reduce the empathy of the self-promoter and decrease the sharing of pleasure by the recipient.”

A team of Harvard researchers recently release a separate paper that underscored the same findings about humble bragging. The researchers ran five different experiments with 302 participants, having them rate the likability and attractiveness of a humble bragger. They found that those who humble bragged were perceived as more irritating and less likable than complainers and traditional braggarts.

At the conclusion of their paper, the researchers print a word of advice for anyone looking to share an achievement: “Faced with the choice to (honestly) brag or (deceptively) humblebrag, would-be self-promoters should choose the former –- and at least reap the rewards of seeming sincere,” they write.

Think before you #humblebrag.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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To King William And Queen Mary, Grace And Peace The Widow Whitrow's Humble Thanksgiving To The Lord Of Hosts, The King Of

To King William And Queen Mary, Grace And Peace The Widow Whitrow's Humble Thanksgiving To The Lord Of Hosts, The King Of


This book represents an authentic reproduction of the text as printed by the original publisher. While we have attempted to accurately maintain the integrity of the original work, there are sometimes problems with the original work or the micro-film from which the books were digitized. This can result in errors in reproduction. Possible imperfections include missing and blurred pages, poor pictures, markings and other reproduction issues beyond our control. Because this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment to protecting, preserving and promoting the world''s literature. ++++The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification:++++To King William and Queen Mary, grace and peace The widow Whitrow''s humble thanksgiving to the Lord of Hosts, the king of eternal glory, the God of all our mercies, unto whom be glory, glory, and praise for the king''s safe return to England.Whitrowe, Joan.Signed at end of text: Jone Whitrowe, Putney, New-years day,1691/2.16 p.[London] : printed and sold by most book-sellers in London and Westminster, 1691/2.Smith, J. Catalogue of Friends'' Books. II p.924. /Wing (2nd ed.) / W2036EnglishReproduction of the original in the Trinity College (University of Cambridge) Library++++This book represents an authentic reproduction of the text as printed by the original publisher. While we have attempted to accurately maintain the integrity of the original work, there are sometimes problems with the original work or the micro-film from which the books were digitized. This can result in errors in reproduction. Possible imperfections include missing and blurred pages, poor pictures, markings and other reproduction issues beyond our control. Because this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment to protecting, preserving and promoting the world''s literature.
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