The Museum World Is Having An Identity Crisis, And Firing Powerful Women Won’t Help

When the man who curated a Carl Andre show fires a woman who curated a Kerry James Marshall show, it’s not a good look.
Culture and Arts
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

How Black Panther Helped Marvel Discover Its Musical Identity

Thanks to Thor Ragnarok and now Black Panther, the MCU is finally putting an emphasis on delivering great music.
IGN All

SHOPPING DISCOUNT UPDATE:

GameStop, Inc.

Clippers have found their identity, but how long will it last?

While Blake Griffin and Co. have regrouped after the departure of Chris Paul, the team still faces a very uncertain future.
www.espn.com – NBA

Sam Smith Opens Up on Gender-Fluid Identity: ‘I Feel Just as Much a Woman as I Am a Man’

Sam Smith doesn’t need labels.

In a candid interview with The Sunday Times, the English singer opened up his gender identity, saying he doesn’t consider himself a cisgender man.

“I don’t know what the title would be, but I feel just as much woman as I am man,” he elaborated.

Smith explained that he likes dressing in drag, revealing that he hits up the Australian drag shop House of Priscilla whenever he’s in Sydney, Australia.

“Oh, my god, I just buy everything — heels, dresses,” he said. “We have a great time.”

And this habit is nothing new. The 25-year-old crooner said he used to head to school in women’s clothing as a teen.

“There was one moment in my life where I didn’t own a piece of male clothing, really,” he said. “I would wear full make-up every day in school, eyelashes, leggings with Dr. Martens and huge fur coats, for 2 ½ years.”

RELATED VIDEO: Sam Smith on His Dramatic Weight Loss: ‘I Went to Bed Dreaming of Tuna Melts’

Smith also opened up about coming out as gay, saying, “Looking back on it, it was the fear of saying the wrong thing and offending … And I was 19 when I started writing the first album. I’d just moved to London from a village — I was literally the only gay in the village. I didn’t know what I wanted to say.”

The singer also teased fans with a hint of what his new album Thrill of It All, dropping on Nov. 3, holds.

“I think they show my growth, my confidence. I feel like they show me,” he said. “They show the gay guy I’ve become.”

Earlier this month, Smith attended a performance of the Broadway hit Dear Evan Hansen — and rumored new boyfriend Brandon Flynn was also there.

His theater outing comes after he was pictured kissing and holding hands with the 13 Reasons Why star while out in Greenwich Village earlier in the day.


PEOPLE.com

Fashion Deals Update:

The Pop Diva Identity Crisis

With the rise of hip-hop, a string of A-list pop stars like Taylor Swift, Lady Gaga, Miley Cyrus and Katy Perry have stumbled. ‘There’s a changing of the guard.’
WSJ.com: Lifestyle

SHOPPING DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Buy.com (dba Rakuten.com Shopping)

Books of The Times: Through the Lens of the Obama Years, Ta-Nehisi Coates Reckons With Race, Identity and Trump

“We Were Eight Years in Power” is a selection of Coates’s most influential pieces from The Atlantic, with new material about what he was thinking and feeling when he wrote them.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Superman: Mr. Oz’s Identity Is Revealed

Action Comics #987 has answered one of the biggest mysteries of DC Rebirth.

STL054574

Warning: this article contains spoilers for Action Comics #987!

The identity of the enigmatic Mr. Oz has easily been one of the biggest overarching mysteries in the DCU lately. It’s a mystery that predates DC Rebirth itself, with Mr. Oz originally appearing in Geoff Johns and John Romita Jr.’s Superman run in 2014. But this character has truly risen to the forefront over the past year, secretly spying on heroes like Superman and kidnapping everyone from Red Robin to Doomsday as part of his larger plan.

Continue reading…

IGN All

SHOPPING DISCOUNT UPDATE:

GameStop, Inc.

‘Nearly 500 cases of identity fraud a day’

Identity fraud is soaring to “epidemic levels” with almost 500 cases a day reported, it has been warned.
Tech News – Latest Technology and Gadget News | Sky News

COMPUTER & ENTERTAINMENT SPECIALS!

TigerDirect Best Sellers

‘The Big Sick,’ South Asian Identity and Me

The hit movie reflects the world that one New York Times writer grew up in. But does it do so at the expense of South Asian women?
NYT > Arts

SPECIAL TRAVEL DISCOUNTS:
Orbitz Worldwide Inc

Buyers Seek Standouts With Identity at Paris Men’s Trade Shows

PARIS — It was all about having a strong identity at the recent spring 2018 men’s trade shows here. Homespun, cultural references, vintage and surf styles and streetwear were selling well, with buyers seeking standout items and new discoveries to complement their core designer offering and differentiate themselves, rather than seeking out specific trends.
“Trends are hard to build a business around these days,” observed Chris Thomas, director of retail for Melbourne, Australia’s Service Denim Stores. “We’re looking for accessories to accentuate our core offer that have a point of uniqueness in the Australian market,” he said. “The ability to be unisex is important, too.”
Indeed, more and more brands were showing what they described as “unisex” collections as the trend for outsize gender-neutral garments continues to gain traction. Labels that tapped into heritage styles and techniques, especially from Japan and France, were also popular, as were new takes on performance wear.
Brands showing at Tranoï, Man and Capsule, held over the weekend during Paris Men’s Fashion Week, said foot traffic had been relatively slow, although key buyers had walked through, with a strong presence from Asian, especially Japan, and U.K.-based retailers.
Paul Craig, co-owner of The Bureau, a multibrand men’s store in Belfast,

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWDWWD
Florsheim

Banksy’s secret identity: Who is ‘Robert’?

Banksy’s secret identity might have been revealed in a radio interview in which DJ Goldie referred to the artist as “Robert”.
Entertainment News – Latest Celebrity & Showbiz News | Sky News

ENTERTAINMENT SPECIALS:

New York Vegan Chain Battles Identity Crisis

Vegan fast-casual chain By Chloe has “terminated” ties with namesake chef and cookbook author Chloe Coscarelli after an arbitrator ruled this month in favor of former partner ESquared Hospitality concerning several issues.
WSJ.com: Lifestyle

SHOPPING DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Buy.com (dba Rakuten.com Shopping)

Nonfiction: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on Two Books About Muslim Identity

Omar Saif Ghobash’s “Letters to a Young Muslim” offers advice for young Muslims in the West, and Ali A. Rizvi’s “The Atheist Muslim” is about a journey from believer to atheist.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Nonfiction: A Feminist’s Biography of Steven Spielberg Focuses on His Jewish Identity

In “Steven Spielberg: A Life in Films,” Molly Haskell traces the evolution of the director’s Jewish identity.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Body Language: Sisters in Shape, Black Women’s Fitness, and Feminist Identity Politics

Body Language: Sisters in Shape, Black Women’s Fitness, and Feminist Identity Politics


In her evocative ethnographic study, Body Language, Kimberly Lau traces the multiple ways in which the success of an innovative fitness program illuminates what identity means to its Black female clientele and how their group interaction provides a new perspective on feminist theories of identity politics-especially regarding the significance of identity to political activism and social change. Sisters in Shape, Inc, Fitness Consultants (SIS), a Philadelphia company, promotes balance in physical, mental, and spiritual health. Its program goes beyond workouts, as it educates and motivates women to make health and fitness a priority. Discussing the obstacles at home and the importance of the group’s solidarity to their ability to stay focused on their goals, the women speak to the ways in which their commitment to reshaping their bodies is a commitment to an alternative future. Body Language shows how the group’s explorations of black women’s identity open new possibilities for identity-based claims to recognition, justice, and social change.

Price: $
Sold by Kobo U.S

(Set) Buxton RFID Identity Safe Wallet in Black, Pewter and Purple Palm Size

(Set) Buxton RFID Identity Safe Wallet in Black, Pewter and Purple Palm Size


(Set) 1 Each: Buxton RFID Wallet in black, pewter and purple. Block identity theft with this palm-size wallet. Keep your identity safe from scammers that scan your wallet from a distance to steal your personal information! Cute faux leather wallet has a special liner designed to prevent this type of electronic theft. It also features 2 zippered compartments, ID window, 9 accordion folds, plus 2 pockets for change or cash. Approx. 4x 3.5x 1.5. Imported.

Price: $
Sold by Buy.com (dba Rakuten.com Shopping)

Oneika Russell Engages the Tropical Body and Caribbean Identity in Her Work

There was the outline of a face and a body with no distinguishable features, but for the eyes. Behind this figure was a city/landscape and the figure seemed to be infused with bright colorful Caribbean foliage/flowers. I was immediately intrigued by the series in which female characters were at times engorged by or hidden behind the common flowers of the Caribbean.

The work in question is part of artist Oneika Russell’s “A Natural History” body of work. This is a series the Jamaican-born artist created mostly while living in Kyoto, Japan, and in the work she sought to represent the experience of being an outsider in a culture that at first seemed very alien to her. Said the artist, “I was trying to understand how to make an image which conveyed what the tropical body and a tropical identity might be or look like.” This fusion of the black body and Caribbean foliage would eventually become an artist’s book printed in 2015. “A Natural History,” thus far, is Oneika Russell’s most well-known work.

Oneika Russell was born in St. Andrew, Jamaica, and graduated from Knox College High School. She attended sixth form at Ardenne High School in Kingston. It was while she was in sixth form that her doodling would give way to an identifiable interest in the visual arts. Eventually, she would attend the Edna Manley College of Visual and Performing Arts on the island, as a Painting major, though she did take a few courses in photography. At Edna Manley, Russell started doing research for an Aunt Jemima-like character she called Cookie, who would become the basis of her thesis work. Cookie was a commentary on the tourist industry and a critique of race, color and class issues in Jamaica. It is a particularly engaging body of work.

From Edna Manley College, Russell would go on to do her master’s degree at Goldsmiths College, where there was a strong focus on theory and where she started working in animation. Her thesis show for Goldsmiths was something she reports not having replicated since then. “I called the work I produced then interruptive painting, and I wanted to create something that was a hybrid art form. In this work I combined several genres around the character of a little girl. For many people this was new media work, but for me, it was still a painting.”

Following her time at Goldsmiths Russell returned to Jamaica and continued her practice, and was working on the island when the Japanese Embassy started offering scholarships to study in Japan. She applied to go and study the visual arts.

Naturally she wanted to know what it would be like for a Jamaican girl to study and live in Japan. “Actually,” Russell conceded, “I loved particularly the art culture in Japan, where there is not so much of an hierarchy among the various art forms. That, for me, was quite liberating. What I struggled with in Japan though was feeling very much like an outsider. I did not speak the language very well, and I lived in Kyoto, which is one of the most traditional places in Japan, even as there is a lot of focus on the environment in Kyoto. I guess in Japan I felt really alienated.”

This feeling of alienation would lead to Russell creating the “A Natural History” body of work. Consequently, Russell explained, if “A Natural History” reads at times like ethnographic works, this is no surprise to the artist who freely admits that in the works — in which she is photographing, videoing and drawing herself in nature — she was “using the language of Anthropology.” The artist continued, “What I sought to do in this work was use Caribbean flowers as a way to identify myself as Caribbean, even as I was using the female body and the flowers to talk about what I think of as my aesthetics and my identity. In short, I found myself in Japan seeking to develop a visual vocabulary and language to express my identity.”

In talking to Russell I was struck by the fact that she referenced language, vocabulary and speaking a lot in her work, particularly the work she did in Japan, and I tried to tease the reasons for this out of her in our discussion. “The fact is,” Russell explained to me, “it seemed to me after a while that I was studying language more than anything else when I was doing my doctoral studies in Japan. In Jamaica I knew myself to be someone quite articulate, but not at all so in Japan, where I was literally struggling to learn the language. I guess this is why language has come to take on so much importance in my work.”

But her time in Japan would see her starting, as well, a new body of work — in gold — that is ongoing. “When I was in Japan I used Facebook a lot to keep in touch with people. For a long time, during the years I was in Japan, Facebook in fact was my only connection to Jamaica. I started making portraits in gold from Facebook photographs of my friends. This ‘Selfie Drawing Project’ would accompany me when I moved back home to the island. For a long time I thought I would just preserve these selfies in gold and move on, particularly once I was back on the island.”

But, of course, this is not what happened.

The selfies started to take on a life of their own and the project keeps growing. In working with gold Russell found that she started thinking about preservations and our human relationships, particularly to gold. “Traditionally gold is a classy, almost universal indication of something precious and more valuable. I became intrigued with that idea and now the paintings in gold are getting larger and larger. I find, too, that they are changing values and I really started to challenge myself to see how many times I can make something different out of using the same basic materials.”

If the artist thought that, upon returning home to the island, the theme of alienation would disappear from her investigations, this is not what would happen, for this theme has remained and could be seen quite strongly in the work she showed in the 2015 Jamaica Biennial. “For me, the work in the Biennial site at Devon House was all about alienation. In this work I wrote a letter to myself and individual lines from the letter were placed on postcards in a child’s bedroom. What I was hoping to do with this work is to use these individual lines from the letter to connect different people.”

Given her continued focus on the theme of alienation, I wondered about her sense of the artistic community on the island.

For Russell the local art scene seems to be collapsing, due to lack of resources and funding. “There are few commercial gallery spaces on the island and a certain generation of art collectors are not collecting contemporary art as before,” she noted. When asked why this might be so, Russell said she imagines that “since the media used in a lot of contemporary art is shifting and changing, collectors might be a bit more shy about engaging with this new media.” She thought about it for a while before continuing. “The Jamaican art-buying public seems to be more educated about painting and drawing, less so about new media, so they may be more reticent in that regard.”

However, the artist remains hopeful.

“While many of the official venues for artists on the island are gone, more and more underground projects are starting up. There is The New Local Space — an artist-run contemporary visual art initiative in Kingston — that has generated a lot of interest on the island, and the National Gallery of Jamaica now seems to focus more on contemporary art production, which is always good for someone like myself who, for a long time thought of herself as a painter; but I was also making videos.”

The artist paused, before continuing. “The term ‘video artist’, for me, boxed me in, but I was clearly engaging new media and technology in my work. I find that I am making more and more work that is interdisciplinary in nature, and maybe these days I should just settle on calling myself not so much a painter anymore but simply a visual artist. I have found that particularly women artists on the island are engaging more interdisciplinary works, which of course calls into question our relationship to the art market since we are not making work that is specifically a commodity.

“In a sense and despite the difficulties, women artists like myself on the island still manage to do our work and the good thing is that curators do not treat us any differently, as far as I can see, from the male artists on the island. I feel I am treated seriously as an artist and whenever that happens it always gives you the confidence to keep doing your work. “

Until next time.

Images copyrighted to Oneika Russell and used with permission.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

I Love Safa Button Badge – Choice Of Sizes – Name Identity Alias Boyfriend Girlfriend

I Love Safa Button Badge – Choice Of Sizes – Name Identity Alias Boyfriend Girlfriend


25mm (1″) or 38mm (1½”) button badges. Professionally produced in our London workshops. Metal construction with ‘D pin’ on the back – not suitable for young children. 2 working day dispatch time. Our Button Badges are perfect for brightening any attire, a neat way of personalising your store bought garb! Each badge is hand crafted by our dedicated team of apparel experts and lovingly packaged and dispatched. Colours may vary depending on your monitor/screen settings. Please remove these badges from garments before washing.

Price: $
Sold by Rakuten.co.uk

I Love Youta Button Badge – Choice Of Sizes – Name Identity Alias ID

I Love Youta Button Badge – Choice Of Sizes – Name Identity Alias ID


25mm (1″) or 38mm (1½”) button badges. Professionally produced in our London workshops. Metal construction with ‘D pin’ on the back – not suitable for young children. 2 working day dispatch time. Our Button Badges are perfect for brightening any attire, a neat way of personalising your store bought garb! Each badge is hand crafted by our dedicated team of apparel experts and lovingly packaged and dispatched. Colours may vary depending on your monitor/screen settings. Please remove these badges from garments before washing.

Price: $
Sold by Rakuten.co.uk

Fashion, Culture and Identity By Fred Davis (Paperback)

Fashion, Culture and Identity By Fred Davis (Paperback)


Overview What do our clothes say about who we are or who we think we are? How does the way we dress communicate messages about our identity? Is the desire to be “in fashion” universal, or is it unique to Western culture? How do fashions change? These are just a few of the intriguing questions Fred Davis sets out to answer in this provocative look at what we do with our clothes and what they can do to us. Much of what we assume to be individual preference, Davis shows, really reflects deeper social and cultural forces. Ours is an ambivalent social world, characterized by tensions over gender roles, social status, and the expression of sexuality. Predicting what people will wear becomes a risky gamble when the link between private self and public persona can be so unstable. Product details Isbn-13: 9780226138091, 978-0226138091 Author: Fred Davis Publisher: The University of Chicago Press Publication date: 1994-06-01 About Wordery Wordery is one of the UK’s largest online booksellers. With millions of satisfied customers who enjoy low prices on a huge range of books, we offer a reliable and trusted service and consistently receive excellent feedback. We offer a huge range of over 8 million books; bestsellers, children’s books, cheap paperbacks, baby books, special edition hardbacks and textbooks. All our books are dispatched from the UK. Wordery offers Free Delivery on all UK orders, and competitively priced international delivery. #HappyReading

Price: $
Sold by Rakuten.co.uk

Relinquishing Our Uncomfortable Inheritance: Eran Riklis’ A Borrowed Identity

2015-07-03-1435946354-6320665-ABI_6.jpg

Tawfeek Barhom and Yaël Abecassis in Eran Riklis’ A Borrowed Identity, photographed by Eitan Riklis

The first film I ever watched by Eran Riklis was The Syrian Bride, starring Hiam Abbass and Makram Khoury. I remember how enthusiastic I was to finally learn something that wasn’t commonplace about the Druze community in the Golan Heights, through the work of this wondrous filmmaker. Fast forward to years later when, at a party, upon meeting a Syrian Druze gentleman I exclaimed “OMG, you must watch The Syrian Bride, it’s a gorgeous film about your community made by an Israeli director.” The man looked at me in disbelief and answered “What does an Israeli know about the Druze!” It was then that I first realized how our origin, our background affects what we’re allowed, and not allowed to talk about, even as artists.

Thanks goodness Riklis never got that memo!

From Cup Final to The Human Resources Manager, from Lemon Tree to Zaytoun, Riklis has always talked about the untalkable in his films: Peace, humanity, and the ability to discuss what makes us different, while also celebrating our contrasts.

I’m a year late in watching Riklis’ latest, A Borrowed Identity — also known as Dancing Arabs, the film’s original title at festivals around the world, and Mon Fils, “My Son” in its French incarnation. But better late than never in this case, because once again, I walk away from one of Eran’s films a different woman, a more informed person and a better human being. It’s become the norm for me with the work of the most open-minded, best cultural bridge-building filmmaker I know.

Typically, I would have watched a film like A Borrowed Identity in Cannes or Venice. But the film ends with such a provocative scene, an idea so unthinkable and bold that I can only imagine the programmers at those festivals scrambling to find words to explain their choices to the press. Simpler for them to just turn it down, quietly. So while it premiered at Locarno, where it was also not given the Golden Leopard it deserved for the same reasons, I assume, A Borrowed Identity traveled a different festival route, finding its biggest success in open-minded Telluride. Now, it is finally in US theaters, enjoying a second week at Lincoln Plaza in NYC, rolling out to West Coast theaters this weekend, and later across the US.

A Borrowed Identity opens with a line by Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish that goes “Identity is our legacy and not our inheritance; our invention and not our memory…” So why should where, how and who we are born decide what we can and cannot do? Unfortunately, not everyone in this world can make a choice, or even attempt to wonder aloud what I’m writing know. Palestinians and Israelis risk much when they do.

Riklis’ film begins slowly. But it builds momentum to a finish that left me and my viewing companion in sobs.

I’ll admit something that shames me, I might have left the theater in the first twenty minutes if I didn’t possess the faith I have in this filmmaker’s genius. The background about the family, the part that comes from the first of Sayed Kashua’s books to make up the storyline of A Borrowed IdentityDancing Arabs — didn’t envelop me right away. Perhaps I would have liked only a hint of the grandmother, as a voiceover, with the fated suitcase opening upon her death and the instructions carried out by her nephew, Eyad (played by the most charismatic acting discovery of the year, Tawfeek Barhom). The story could have started there for me, I didn’t need childhood scenes or interiors.

Yet once Kashua’s narrative from Second Person Singular kicked in, the film grabbed me wholeheartedly. There was no turning back, no turning away from that big screen even for a minute, only and completely with all my being following the triangle of Eyad, Yonathan (played to perfection by Michael Moshonov) and his mother Edna (played by one of my favorite actresses, the stunning Yaël Abecassis). What followed turned out to be, once again, one of those Eran Riklis masterpieces of endless possibilities.

Israeli Arab novelist and journalist Sayed Kashua also wrote the screenplay for the film, which may explain the indulgence of the family set-up. To a writer’s format such details are necessary, while in a film they can be done away with. Though Eyad’s father Salah’s efforts (played by Ali Suliman), to send his son off to an Israeli Hebrew school, clarify much and probably couldn’t be dealt with differently in the narrative.

In the end, A Borrowed Identity left me with more questions than answers, more thoughts than words. That’s what a great film should always do, while also helping its audience to understand themselves and the world around them just a little bit more. It’s a film full of courage, by a filmmaker who is unafraid and unapologetic about who he is. And perfect proof that our background, our birth-given opportunities have very little to do with the person we become, despite what the world wants us to believe.

For info and screenings check out the Strand Releasing website.

Image by Eitan Riklis courtesy of Strand Releasing, used with permission.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Visit Gabby Love today for the hottest fashion entertainment online!
Ashley Madison - Have an affair. Married Dating, Affairs, Married Women, Extramarital Affair

Relinquishing Our Uncomfortable Inheritance: Eran Riklis’ A Borrowed Identity

2015-07-03-1435946354-6320665-ABI_6.jpg

Tawfeek Barhom and Yaël Abecassis in Eran Riklis’ A Borrowed Identity, photographed by Eitan Riklis

The first film I ever watched by Eran Riklis was The Syrian Bride, starring Hiam Abbass and Makram Khoury. I remember how enthusiastic I was to finally learn something that wasn’t commonplace about the Druze community in the Golan Heights, through the work of this wondrous filmmaker. Fast forward to years later when, at a party, upon meeting a Syrian Druze gentleman I exclaimed “OMG, you must watch The Syrian Bride, it’s a gorgeous film about your community made by an Israeli director.” The man looked at me in disbelief and answered “What does an Israeli know about the Druze!” It was then that I first realized how our origin, our background affects what we’re allowed, and not allowed to talk about, even as artists.

Thanks goodness Riklis never got that memo!

From Cup Final to The Human Resources Manager, from Lemon Tree to Zaytoun, Riklis has always talked about the untalkable in his films: Peace, humanity, and the ability to discuss what makes us different, while also celebrating our contrasts.

I’m a year late in watching Riklis’ latest, A Borrowed Identity — also known as Dancing Arabs, the film’s original title at festivals around the world, and Mon Fils, “My Son” in its French incarnation. But better late than never in this case, because once again, I walk away from one of Eran’s films a different woman, a more informed person and a better human being. It’s become the norm for me with the work of the most open-minded, best cultural bridge-building filmmaker I know.

Typically, I would have watched a film like A Borrowed Identity in Cannes or Venice. But the film ends with such a provocative scene, an idea so unthinkable and bold that I can only imagine the programmers at those festivals scrambling to find words to explain their choices to the press. Simpler for them to just turn it down, quietly. So while it premiered at Locarno, where it was also not given the Golden Leopard it deserved for the same reasons, I assume, A Borrowed Identity traveled a different festival route, finding its biggest success in open-minded Telluride. Now, it is finally in US theaters, enjoying a second week at Lincoln Plaza in NYC, rolling out to West Coast theaters this weekend, and later across the US.

A Borrowed Identity opens with a line by Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish that goes “Identity is our legacy and not our inheritance; our invention and not our memory…” So why should where, how and who we are born decide what we can and cannot do? Unfortunately, not everyone in this world can make a choice, or even attempt to wonder aloud what I’m writing know. Palestinians and Israelis risk much when they do.

Riklis’ film begins slowly. But it builds momentum to a finish that left me and my viewing companion in sobs.

I’ll admit something that shames me, I might have left the theater in the first twenty minutes if I didn’t possess the faith I have in this filmmaker’s genius. The background about the family, the part that comes from the first of Sayed Kashua’s books to make up the storyline of A Borrowed IdentityDancing Arabs — didn’t envelop me right away. Perhaps I would have liked only a hint of the grandmother, as a voiceover, with the fated suitcase opening upon her death and the instructions carried out by her nephew, Eyad (played by the most charismatic acting discovery of the year, Tawfeek Barhom). The story could have started there for me, I didn’t need childhood scenes or interiors.

Yet once Kashua’s narrative from Second Person Singular kicked in, the film grabbed me wholeheartedly. There was no turning back, no turning away from that big screen even for a minute, only and completely with all my being following the triangle of Eyad, Yonathan (played to perfection by Michael Moshonov) and his mother Edna (played by one of my favorite actresses, the stunning Yaël Abecassis). What followed turned out to be, once again, one of those Eran Riklis masterpieces of endless possibilities.

Israeli Arab novelist and journalist Sayed Kashua also wrote the screenplay for the film, which may explain the indulgence of the family set-up. To a writer’s format such details are necessary, while in a film they can be done away with. Though Eyad’s father Salah’s efforts (played by Ali Suliman), to send his son off to an Israeli Hebrew school, clarify much and probably couldn’t be dealt with differently in the narrative.

In the end, A Borrowed Identity left me with more questions than answers, more thoughts than words. That’s what a great film should always do, while also helping its audience to understand themselves and the world around them just a little bit more. It’s a film full of courage, by a filmmaker who is unafraid and unapologetic about who he is. And perfect proof that our background, our birth-given opportunities have very little to do with the person we become, despite what the world wants us to believe.

For info and screenings check out the Strand Releasing website.

Image by Eitan Riklis courtesy of Strand Releasing, used with permission.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Visit Gabby Love today for the hottest fashion entertainment online!
Ashley Madison - Have an affair. Married Dating, Affairs, Married Women, Extramarital Affair

Food and Identity in England, 1540-1640: Eating to Impress

Food and Identity in England, 1540-1640: Eating to Impress


Food and Identity in England, 1540-1640: Eating to Impress

Price: $
Sold by Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

“Yes, And”: What Making an Independent Film Taught Me About Identity, Fear and Self-Worth as a Woman

In acting, the first rule of improvisation is to say, “Yes, AND”, the idea behind it being that a scene can only move forward if you first accept the circumstances around you, and then add to them. “Yes, AND” allows for collaboration. “Yes, AND” fosters imagination. “Yes, AND” instigates progress.

For a long time, my life felt like one “No” after another. I wanted to be an actor but couldn’t even get an audition, never mind an actual role. I was working four jobs and just barely getting by. I was definitely more “starving” than “artist”.

I was losing the “game” that is getting work as an actor. The truth is that I wasn’t trying very hard to play it. I didn’t like the rules. As a woman, I felt like I was expected to live up to an imaginary ideal perpetuated by the oversimplified narrative most female characters are placed into. I remember one particularly painful audition that required all the actresses to bring bikinis with them. Usually I would have fled from kind of request, but it was for a reputable graduate film program so, (against my better judgement) I went. I made it to the “please put your bathing suit on” phase and was then given a scene that required me to violently assault my scene partner. I asked if we could practice once or twice, just to make sure no one got hurt. Or perhaps I could just show my half-naked rage through my words? I was dismissed and received an email a few days later saying that I was “too aristocratic” for the part. I was tempted to reply “Are you sure you didn’t mean ‘too smart’?”

I thought getting an agent would help my situation, but was told again and again that I was not a “type” and therefore un-castable. It would be more accurate to say that I am not a “type” that fits into the mainstream representation of women. Where were the stories and roles that I identified with? I was stuck.

But then I got a text from my good friend, Will Sullivan. It read:

“I want to shoot a movie this summer. All improv. For zero budget. Will you produce and star in it?”

In that moment, the answer seemed obvious to me. YES. Had I ever produced a film before? No. Did I have any idea what this movie was going to be about? Of course not. But what did I have to lose?

So I said Yes. And it was in my power to make it happen. It was time to choose my own narrative.

We decided to make a film about relationships – not about falling in love, but about what it takes to make love last. Will and our cinematographer, Derek Dodge, wrote the story outline, but there was never a set script. It was up to the actors to create their own dialogue and define the arc of each scene. I had the freedom to craft a character who was in a state of change and therefore undefined by any mold. The experience was transformative for me, not only as an actor and first time producer, but as a young woman who felt like she needed to re-define her sense of self. It scared me, so I knew it was important.

My greatest obstacle has always been fear. Fear of imperfection, fear of being wrong, fear of failing. This project taught me that there is no better cure for fear than action. As we hurtled towards production, I oscillated between thrill and absolute terror. I had no idea what I was doing but I had to do it anyway. Everyday I woke up feeling like I was in full relevé on the edge of a cliff. The only way to forward was to jump. There were moments of soaring and moments of falling hard on my face. I learned, though, that even if I fell, at least I had found the ground. I could get up and keep going. Three days before our shoot started, I cut off all my hair. I did it for the part, but I also did it for me. While the deed itself was superficial, it symbolized the letting go of an image I felt I was expected to fit into. I was released from who I thought I should be, and free to figure out who I could be.

What started as a text message is now a feature film, That’s Not Us, set to be released later this year. Making it was a gift of self-discovery – as a leader, as a woman, as an artist, and as an imperfect being who still has much to learn. I had the privilege of being able to make mistakes and learn by doing. To me, that is the true essence of independent film. It’s about creating work on your own terms, exploding the mold, and saying “yes, and” to the opportunities that come with attempting the unknown.

That’s Not Us premieres at the Inside Out Film Festival in Toronto on May 23rd, 2015. Follow them on Facebook, Twitter, or visit their website at www.thatsnotus.com

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Sarah Deragon’s ‘The Identity Project’ Challenges The Way We Think About Queer Identity

“The Identity Project,” from photographer Sarah Deragon, challenges the way that we compartmentalize and think about queerness and identity.

The photo series captures the way subjects want to present themselves to the world around them and communicate their personal ways of self-identifying. Mainstream understandings of what it means to be lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) tend to be narrow and specific, but with “The Identity Project,” we can see the infinite shades and hues of queerness that make up the spectrum of human identity.

dapper

The Huffington Post chatted with Deragon this week about her work and how the project has grown.

The Huffington Post: What is your driving vision for The Identity Project?
Sarah Deragon: My main vision for The Identity Project is to expand what we normally understand to be the LGBTQ communities. I wanted to create a photo project that allowed participants to self-identify and stand up and be seen for who they really are. I honestly thought that the project would be a small collection of 50 or so photographs, but the response to the project was so profound that I decided to expand it and travel to several US cities like New York City, Portland, Chicago and soon Austin to photograph more people. I imagine that this will be an ongoing project for me throughout my lifetime.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

How to Be Safe: Protect Yourself and Your Family from Identity Theft, Predators, Scammers and Intruders

How to Be Safe: Protect Yourself and Your Family from Identity Theft, Predators, Scammers and Intruders


Written by Ira Lipman, founder and chairman of Guardsmark, one of the world’s largest security service companies, this valuable guide will show you and your family how to protect yourself from identity theft, predators, scams, intruders and more How to Be Safe is the most comprehensive safety and security manual on the market, encouraging individuals to take a positive, preventive approach to their own safety. This well-researched reference, written by the founder and chairman of Guardsmark, one of the world’s largest security service companies, shows you how to protect yourself from crime even when challenged by the greatest odds. Jam-packed with unique tips and handy guidelines to deal with muggers, burglars, stalkers, and worse, HOW TO BE SAFE reveals what attracts criminals to you, your home, your loved ones, or your business and provides the proven tactics to scare them off. From securing your home with tips from the professionals to protecting your investments and arming your computer with the best virus-protection software, the information inside will help you stay one step ahead of even the savviest criminal minds. If you’re concerned about becoming a victim of crime, keep this book handy and follow its practical and personally relevant advice. Learn the secrets of the security pros and discover how to… – Secure your home while on vacation. – Establish a safe workplace. – Protect kids from violence and bullying. – Stay safe when jogging, shopping, or taking mass transportation. – Detect an unsafe college campus. – Avoid Internet scams and e-mail traps. – Select a safe nursing home or daycare center. – Deal with sexual assault and stalkers. – Respond to a terrorist attack. – And so much more

Price: $
Sold by Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC