United Tech to Break Itself Into Three Companies

The industrial conglomerate has decided to separate itself into three independent companies, breaking apart one of America’s last industrial conglomerates.
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Black Mirror: Bandersnatch Script Was a Game in Itself

It’s pretty common to hear actors talking about the first time they read a script for a project, but you generally don’t hear about them playing one.

Black Mirror’s one-off interactive episode, Bandersnatch, required a different approach for its actors to get acquainted with its multi-limbed script – creator Charlie Brooker turned it into a Twine game.

was very, very confusing to read in its physical form”, says Colin Ritman actor Will Poulter to IGN. “But I later got the opportunity to read it in sort of Twine document format. So it’s a kind of software that allows you to effectively play the script and experience it in a similar way to how the viewer experiences it, and that helped to make sense of it.”

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Amazon, to Win in Booming Rural India, Reinvents Itself

The retailer is targeting hundreds of millions of new online shoppers in India’s countryside by simplifying its order screen with Hindi and videos, opening stores to help people shop and adding a fleet of local deliverymen who can take payments.
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United Tech to Break Itself Into Three Companies

The industrial conglomerate has decided to separate itself into three independent companies, breaking apart one of America’s last industrial conglomerates.
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‘Going, Going, Gone…’: Banksy Artwork Shreds Itself After Sale

Banksy, the anonymous British street artist famous for his political spoofs, pulled a $ 1 million prank on a buyer of one of his works.
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Life Itself (2018)

Life Itself (2018) Opens Friday, Sep 21, 2018

As a young New York couple goes from college romance to marriage and the birth of their first child, the unexpected twists of their journey create reverberations that echo over continents and through lifetimes.

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Books of The Times: After Disaster, Japan Seals Itself Off From the World in ‘The Emissary’

Yoko Tawada’s new novel imagines a time in which language starts to vanish and the elderly care for weakened children.
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Can Hollywood Fix Its Harassment Problem While Celebrating Itself?

As allegations of sexual exploitations pile up, the industry has absorbed the critiques and converted them into inspirational messaging and branding exercises.
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GE May Break Itself Up, CEO Says

General Electric is considering breaking itself apart, its chief executive said, after disclosing more problems buried in one of its major units.
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Among the iPhone’s Biggest Transformations: Apple Itself

Since Apple launched the iPhone in June 2007, the smartphone revolution it unleashed has changed the way people work and socialize while reshaping industries from music to hotels. It also has transformed the company in ways that co-founder Steve Jobs could hardly have foreseen.
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Among the iPhone’s Biggest Transformations: Apple Itself

Since Apple launched the iPhone in June 2007, the smartphone revolution it unleashed has changed the way people work and socialize while reshaping industries from music to hotels. It also has transformed the company in ways that co-founder Steve Jobs could hardly have foreseen.
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Books of The Times: In ‘The Retreat of Western Liberalism,’ How Democracy Is Defeating Itself

The Financial Times columnist Edward Luce finds that Trumpism and other nationalist movements are symptoms, not causes, of larger trends threatening democratic collapse.
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Smart duvet: the bed that makes itself

A bed that can make itself after being slept in is developed in Montreal, Canada.
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31 Ways Hawaii Really Outdid Itself

Hawaii isn’t only beaches for days and mountains that won’t stop. It’s also full people who really know how to live. Out of all the United States, Hawaii is a beautiful, mystical unicorn in a vast sea of regular horses.

Here are 31 things that make us love Hawaii even more than we did yesterday.

1. This Target:

So when is it enough….u kno u in Hawai’i when u get dis much spam #hilife #gotspam #ebt #onlyinhawaii

A photo posted by Kainalu Nick DeMello (@kainalu21) on

2.That time young Barry Obama sort-of predicted the future in the sidewalk of his Honolulu school:

My man

A photo posted by Steve Marzo (@heysteeevo) on

3. Flying cannonball coconuts:

flying coconuts

4. This friendly dumpster:

#ViewsOfOahu @uhmanoa_art

A photo posted by Kaimana Pinē (@kaimanapine) on

5. Two words: Mongoose. Fur:

Best of Craigslist! @jerekbarcelonavision would match with your uggs!

A photo posted by Josh Tamaoka (@jkt808) on

6. This yoga mob:

7. This Auntie who is always watching:

Wise words from Auntie. #onlyinhawaii #luckywelivehawaii #maui

A photo posted by Erin Lodi (@erinlodi) on

8. This parking-spot-stealing wild chicken:

Oh you know, just a normal trip to the doctor in Hawaii… #OnlyinHawaii #hawaii #oahu #rooster #wildchicken #pearlharbor

A photo posted by Shelby Loveland (@shelbyloveland) on

9. This mode of transportation:

10. This snow man:

sandman

11. This pidgin Bible:
“God wen get so plenny love an aloha fo da peopo inside da world, dat he wen send me, his one an ony Boy, so dat everybody dat trus me no get cut off from God, but get da kine life dat stay to da max foeva.”
pidgin bible

12. This helpful sign:
508497237

13. These disproportionate fruits:
apple banana

14. This street:

peepee falls

15. These directions:

map to hawaii

16. This street art:

17. This debate:

hawaii news item

18. And this local landmark:

rent all

19. This lava-tube movie theater:

20. This:

21. This thirst-quencher:

Can not live without. #onlyinhawaii

A photo posted by Ann Sun (@asunasun) on

22. This shaka-flashing bus:

23. These original weddings:

24. These businessmen:

#alohafridays

A photo posted by Angie (@theangieplitch) on

25. This friendly pigeon:

26. This 67-degree headline:

27. This McValue meal:

About to mop dis coz it’s faaahreezing!!! #mcdonaldsaimin #dindin #onlyinhawaii #cold #alldayerrday #happyalohafriday

A photo posted by Raylyne Ann Fernandez (@raydenjames) on

28. This Geico bill:

My Geico bill finally arrived. #geico #onlyinhawaii #luckyweliveinhawaii

A photo posted by Whitley Fulcher (@whitley_klyce) on

29. This snack:

Just had to get these. #spamflavoredmacadamianuts?! #onlyinhawaii

A photo posted by Karen Park (@kpnb1221) on

30. This legitimate threat:

Posted sign by Manua Kea!! Photo creds to #robertakins#hawai’i #onlyinhawaii

A photo posted by @karenjackson3530 on

31. And the need for this:

#nomopeds #darnit how am I gonna go upstairs now…. #onlyinhawaii #mopeddiscrimination

A photo posted by Mario Patino (@patinodesigns) on

Comedy – The Huffington Post
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Life Itself Movie CLIP – Ava DuVernay (2014) – Roger Ebert Documentary HD

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Life Itself Movie CLIP – Ava DuVernay (2014) – Roger Ebert Documentary HD

Acclaimed director Steve James (Hoop Dreams) and executive producers Martin Scorsese (The Departed) and Steven Zaillian (Moneyball) present LIFE ITSELF, a documentary film that recounts the inspiring and entertaining life of world-renowned film critic and social commentator Roger Ebert—a story that is by turns personal, funny, painful, and transcendent. Based on his bestselling memoir of the same name, LIFE ITSELF explores the legacy of Roger Ebert’s life, from his Pulitzer Prize-winning film criticism at the Chicago Sun-Times to becoming one of the most influential cultural voices in America.
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Health Care Will Not Reform Itself

Health Care Will Not Reform Itself


Presents a basic primer on the American health care system. This title offers a step-by-step blueprint for achieving real improvements in health care delivery. It explains how health insurance works in the US compared with the rest of the world and outlines the barriers to American reform.

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ReThink Review: Life Itself — On Roger Ebert and Why I Review Movies

For most movie critics living today, Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Roger Ebert is their patron saint. While I rarely read his reviews, I know that he’s influenced me more than I even know, starting from when I was a little kid watching At the Movies with Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert, which I still think is the perfect format for a movie review show and probably contributed to me wanting to be a critic in the first place. The new documentary Life Itself traces Ebert’s life and extraordinary career while also chronicling the final four months of his life before he died after a long battle with cancer which took his ability to speak but supercharged his compulsion to write. Watch the trailer for Life Itself below.

Based on Ebert’s book of the same name, Life Itself traces Ebert’s career as a born writer who eventually became a reporter at the Chicago Sun-Times where, at the age of 25, he was made their full-time movie critic (then an unglamorous job) when the previous critic quit. But Ebert’s talent and intelligence quickly elevated the reviews, eventually earning him a Pulitzer, to the point that someone got the then-novel idea of starting a movie review TV show pairing Ebert with Chicago Tribune critic and rival Gene Siskel.

It’s this part of the film, detailing the evolution of the show and Ebert and Siskel’s relationship, that I found the most fascinating and fun since footage and interviews (including the first-ever interview with Siskel’s widow Marlene) reveal that the enmity and differences between Siskel and Ebert went even deeper than they appeared on a show famous for their testy exchanges. The two were an odd couple in every way, but their dynamic led to them becoming the most famous and powerful film critics in history and eventually the closest of friends — a journey that could make a great film on its own. And filmmakers, several of whom are interviewed, recognized Ebert not as a scourge or scold, but a lover of film who only wanted them to do their best work.

Throughout, Life Itself returns to 2013 as Ebert continues his work and convalesces from an injury, only to learn that his cancer has spread, giving him only months to live. As the end approaches, we’re given an intimate look at his relationships with Ebert’s beloved wife Chaz, her family, and the meaning they brought to his life.

Life Itself is directed by Hoop Dreams director Steve James, who attributes the success of his film to Siskel and Ebert’s early and repeated support. But Life Itself — at nearly two hours — is not a puff piece, examining both the celebrated and unflattering aspects of Ebert’s personality, from his intelligence and writing skills which were obvious at an early age to his reputation for being an arrogant, sometimes mean attention hog. It’s a terrific film about the man, loving movies, cancer, and the role of honest criticism that you don’t need to be a critic to enjoy, though it inevitably leads this critic to think about why I do what I do.

I don’t think of myself as a disciple of Ebert, but his influence on me is undeniable. When I was still a little kid, Ebert (I preferred him to Siskel) showed me that movies should be enjoyed in context for what they are, not in comparison to an alleged golden age or an idea of what movies are supposed to be, and that movies could not only be art, but art that could be enjoyed and understood by everyone — provided it was done well. He was intellectual yet not condescending, part of the populist streak that ran through all his work — something that I relate to and probably unconsciously emulate.

I see my reviews as not being about me knowing more about movies than you or telling you how to think, but simply as an attempt to explain clearly why I feel the way I do about a movie while being honest about my biases and shortcomings, which is why I never apologize for movies I haven’t seen. After all, I’m not a movie expert or someone trying to be what I think a critic is supposed to be, but simply a guy who loves movies and loves writing about them.

But above all else, I share a belief that Ebert states early in Life Itself: that “movies are like a machine that generates empathy.” Movies are the most powerful and accessible storytelling device that humans have created, possessing a unique power to educate and enlighten, whether it’s through presenting information, letting you into the lives of people different from you, or by putting a character you relate to in a situation you’ve shared or maybe never experienced. By doing this, movies can challenge your beliefs and preconceptions, make you feel less alone, or at least provide viewers with a shared experience that can spark a conversation based on each individual’s unique interpretation of it. And it’s only through empathy and discussion that we’ll be able to put aside our differences, emphasize what connects us, and make the world a better place.

These might be lofty ideas for a guy who runs his mouth about movies. But Roger Ebert showed that talking about movies can be a pretty wonderful thing. And if you don’t believe me, Life Itself will almost definitely change your mind.
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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The Roger Ebert Documentary ‘Life Itself’ Shines At Sundance

As I write this fourth update, I have now seen 15 movies at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. (I should add: I am very, very tired.) I’ve been sitting at my computer for the last 10 minutes trying to think of some fun anecdote to share, but, honestly, I can’t remember much of anything right now, so let’s just get to the movies. Movies that include one of the most special films at the festival, the Roger Ebert documentary, “Life Itself.”

“Life Itself”

life itself

“Life Itself,” a title that was taken from Roger Ebert’s autobiography, chronicles the life of the famed film critic – including the last few months of Ebert’s life in, at times, ghastly detail. It’s heartbreaking to see Ebert in such poor shape for those last few months, especially contrasted with the guy who used to be so full of life. But even in those final months, Ebert’s writing was still very much full of life.

I don’t want to paint “Life Itself” as a sad film. There’s a sequence where outtakes are shown of Ebert and Gene Siskel filming a television promo that are downright hilarious. Thankfully, a lot of time is spent on Siskel (who died in 1999) and the strange relationship the two shared. It was Siskel’s insistence on hiding the severity of his condition from Ebert -– Ebert had been hurt that he wasn’t in Siskel’s inner circle concerning his condition — that led Ebert to be as open as possible about his future medical conditions.

It’s a shame Ebert didn’t live to see this film released, but in an interview conducted for the film, he was fairly sure that he would never live to see the finished film. “Life Itself” will take you through the emotional gauntlet. No, Ebert wasn’t a saint and this documentary doesn’t sugarcoat that fact. But it does give us a look at this man who lived an extraordinary life and inspired so many. “Life Itself” is one of the best films at Sundance.

“Laggies”

laggies

When “Laggies” begins, it almost feels like a distant cousin to “Bridesmaids.” (Note: I am in no way comparing “Laggies” to “Bridesmaids,” just the first ten minutes.) There are some laughs! I laughed a few times! Keira Knightly plays Megan, a woman with an advanced degree, yet who is content doing not much of anything with her career. After her best friend’s wedding, during which her boyfriend (Mark Webber) unsuccessfully tries to propose, she’s asked by a high school student, Annika (Chloë Grace Moretz), to buy Annika and her other underage friends some alcohol. Megan agrees, then moves in with Annika and falls in love with Annika’s dad (Sam Rockwell). Yes, the plot of this movie is as dumb as that sounds.

Again, there are some legitimately funny scenes, but “Laggies” suffers from way too many “Nobody in real life would ever make the decisions that these characters do” moments. Annika, a stranger, calls Megan and asks Megan to pose as her mother for a meeting at the principal’s office. With no hesitation, Megan agrees. Nobody would ever agree to that! Who are these people? You know what? Never mind, I don’t want to know.

“To Be Takei”

to be takei

I had no idea that George Takei had worked with John Wayne. “To Be Takei” is filled with enough footage and fun facts like that one to satisfy the weary popular culture connoisseur – and, yes, there’s a lot of “Star Trek” – but the film focuses mostly on Takei’s extraordinary post-“Trek” life, in which he’s become one of the leading voices in the LGBT movement.

If you’ve paid attention to Takei’s life, I’m not sure there’s a lot here that someone wouldn’t know – Takei has discussed his unfortunate time in a Japanese internment camp during World War II many times in the past – but Takei just emits joy. It’s impossible to watch Takei speak and not feel some sort of happiness. The film is sprinkled with interviews with the rest of the living “Star Trek” cast, including William Shatner who, honestly, comes off as an asshole. (I can see why when Takei told Shatner to “get off your high horse” at a celebrity roast, he states he wasn’t joking.)

Regardless, Takei has lived a fascinating life and makes for a great case study, even if you don’t know the difference between a Klingon and a Romulan.

Mike Ryan is senior writer for Huffington Post Entertainment. You can contact him directly on Twitter.
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