NFL Network to part ways with Marshall Faulk, Heath Evans, Ike Taylor after scandal

USA TODAY Sports' Jarrett Bell on what players are saying about Terrell Owens' decision to skip the Pro Football Hall of Fame induction ceremony. The NFL Network's game-day broadcast team will look considerably different this season, as a sexual harassment scandal will result in the departure of Hall of Famer Marshall Faulk and two other analysts. Faulk, Heath Evans and Ike Taylor all were suspended last year after a female employee claimed they were among five people at the network who groped and harassed her. The three former players aren’t expected to return to their jobs at NFL Network once the regular season commences, a person with knowledge of the situation told USA TODAY Sports. The person

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Marshall Homecare and Hospice Receive Tribute & Medicine Assistance by ACRX

ACRX Recognition Gallery: American Consultants Rx
http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.

The American Consultants Rx discount prescription cards are to be given free to anyone in need of help curbing the high cost of prescription drugs.

Due to the rising costs, unstable economics, and the mounting cost of prescriptions, American Consultants Rx Inc. (ACRX) a.k.a (ACIRX) an Atlanta based company was born in 2004. The ACRX discount prescription card program was created and over 25 million discount prescription cards were donated to over 18k organizations across the country to be distributed to those in need of prescription assistance free of charge since 2004.

The ACRX cards will offer discounts of name brand drugs of up to 40% off and up to 60% off of generic drugs. They also possess no eligibility requirements, no forms to fill out, or expiration date as well .One card will take care of a whole family. Also note that the ACRX cards will come to your organization already pre-activated .The cards are good at over 50k stores from Walgreen, Wal mart, Eckerd”s, Kmart, Kroger, Publix, and many more. Any one can use these cards but ACRX is focusing on those who are uninsured, underinsured, or on Medicare. The ACRX cards are now in Spanish as well.

American Consultants Rx made arrangements online for the ACRX card to be available at http://www.acrxcards.com where it can also be downloaded. This arrangement has been made to allow organizations an avenue to continue assisting their clients in the community until they receive their orders of the ACRX cards. ACRX made it possible for cards to be requested from online for individuals and organizations free of charge. Request for the ACRX cards can also be made by mailing a request to : ACRX, P.O.Box 161336,Atlanta,GA 30321, faxing a written request to 404-305-9539,or calling the office at 404-767-1072. Please include name (if organization please include organization and contact name),mailing address,designate Spanish or English,amount of cards requested,and telephone number.

American Consultants Rx is working diligently to assist as many people and organizations as possible. It should be noted that while many other organizations and companies place a cost on their money saving cards, American Consultants Rx does not believe a cost should be applied, just to assist our fellow Americans. American Consultants Rx states that it will continue to strive to assist those in need.

‘Marshall’ Brings Thurgood Marshall’s Early Civil Rights Crusade To The Big Screen

Before Thurgood Marshall became the Supreme Court’s first African-American justice and won the landmark case that ended segregation in public schools, he was a lawyer for the NAACP. In 1941, more than a decade before the civil rights movement peaked, Marshall defended a black chauffeur whose white socialite employer accused him of sexual assault.

Black Panther” star Chadwick Boseman, who played Jackie Robinson in “42” and James Brown in “Get On Up,” will portray Marshall in the biopic titled, well, “Marshall.” He’s joined by Sterling K. Brown and Kate Hudson as the chauffeur and socialite, respectively, while Josh Gad plays a Jewish attorney who aided in the defense. 

Directed by Reginald Hudlin (“House Party,” “Boomerang”), “Marshall” opens Oct. 13. Watch the first trailer above.

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Does Brandon Marshall become an exception to Ravens’ domestic-violence stance?

Does Brandon Marshall become an exception to Ravens’ domestic-violence stance?
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Kerry James Marshall And The Limitless Power Of Black Paint

In his expansive retrospective spanning 35 years of work, Kerry James Marshall’s paintings range from urban pastorals to Renaissance-inspired portraits, subtly shifting abstractions to romanticized, domestic interiors. Yet regardless of style, substance or setting, the works converge on a single element: the undiluted blackness of their subjects’ flesh. 

The vast majority of paintings that make up the Western art historical canon feature, of course, white subjects. Marshall’s painted world doesn’t only pass over these white subjects, his subjects’ skin features not a single splash of white paint. The artist’s formula for flesh features three shades of black: carbon black, mars black and ivory black. He will occasionally incorporate yellow and blue shades to round out the color, but no one figure in any painting is darker or lighter than another. Each exists outside a spectrum of shading or valuation; black is black.

Blackness is non-negotiable in those pictures,” Marshall explained in an October interview with T Magazine. “It’s also unequivocal — they are black — that’s the thing that I mean for people to identify immediately. They are black to demonstrate that blackness can have complexity. Depth. Richness.”

A breathtaking exhibition featuring 72 of Marshall’s works, titled “Kerry James Marshall: Mastry,” is now on view at the Met Breuer in New York City. The paintings reflect Marshall’s extensive command of Western art history to generate vivid representations of the African-American experience, past and present.

Marshall’s oeuvre is extraordinary in its ability to confront the injustices of art and American history head-on, while still celebrating the power and beauty of blackness. Its tenor contrasts with the rhetoric employed by president-elect Donald Trump, who has described African-Americans as “living in hell,” presenting a combination of optimism and activism that offers not hope but pride and productive vitality. 

Marshall was born in 1955 in Birmingham, Alabama, and relocated with his family to the Los Angeles neighborhood of Watts in 1963, where they lived 12 blocks from the Black Panther headquarters. Growing up, Marshall witnessed many incidents of violence, though these traumatic experiences were scattered among happy memories of a loving family and happy home life, as well as the enchanting impact of art.  

At 10 years old, Marshall visited the Los Angeles County Museum of Art for the first time and was mesmerized by what he encountered. “I went from floor to floor looking at everything, in the same way that in the library I went down the stacks and looked at every art book, without discrimination,” he told The New Yorker. Three years later, he took a summer drawing course at Otis College of Art and Design, where he would later attend art school, becoming the first in his family to go to college. 

From his earliest encounters with art, Marshall was well aware of the dearth of black bodies represented in museum archives. Yet his reaction was not resentment but determination, to master the art historical trajectory that excluded black bodies and expertly incorporate them into it.  

When you talk about the absence of black figure representation in the history of art,” Marshall said to T Magazine, “you can talk about it as an exclusion, in which case there’s a kind of indictment of history for failing to be responsible for something it should have been. I don’t have that kind of mission. I don’t have that indictment. My interest in being a part of it is being an expansion of it, not a critique of it.”

His dizzying array of art at the Met Breuer expands upon the shamefully limited scope of Western art history in myriad ways, too many to recount or even fully digest on a single visit. Yet one room addresses the issue of art history most straightforwardly, with a series of black painters depicted in the midst of creating their self-portraits. 

The mythic artists, both male and female, meet the viewer’s gaze with regal composure and resolute solemnity. Donning sculptural hairstyles and voguish ensembles punctuated by dramatic collars and splashes of color, Marshall’s subjects seem aware of their statuses as works of art themselves. The paintings address the absence of black artists and black subjects simultaneously, while providing fictitious black artists the rare opportunity to depict their own image on their own terms. 

The wall text reads: “The commanding presence of these figures is also an empowering one ― if you are an artist of color or if you are an artist who is a woman, the answer to the question, ‘What does an artist look like?’ might just be you.”

The self-portraits within the paintings, unfinished, rest propped up on easels in the backdrop. Closer examination reveals many of the canvases are paint-by-numbers, a craze popularized in the 1950s. As Holland Cotter wrote in his New York Times review of the exhibition: “It was a type of painting for anyone and everyone, universal in that way. And although the subjects were fixed, the colors were not.”

The paint-by-numbers canvasses implore those who wish to upheave racial bias in the art historical canon to do so by partaking in the universal practice of making art themselves. The activity-book-like format nods to the uncanny relationship between race and color, illuminating how simple it would be and has always been to dip a paintbrush in black paint instead of white. And yet even the painted figures have yet to render their self-portraits in their black likeness, as though even today the act of painting a black subject remains a radical act. 

And yet, of course, Marshall has accomplished said act, over 70 times and counting. The 61-year-old artist, who was awarded the MacArthur Fellowship in 1997, shows up all day, every day, to his studio, where he paints sans assistants from morning until night. 

The fact that Marshall’s retrospective is on view at The Met, of all places, is hugely significant. As Ian Alteveer, the Met curator who organized the exhibition along with Helen Molesworth and Dieter Roelstraete explained to The New York Times: “There are 5,000-plus years of art history here, and that’s the history he wants to be a part of and to paint to be a part of.”

Marshall’s depictions of black creativity and power extend beyond the art studio, depicting barber shops, public housing developments and intimate bedrooms. The retrospective is a remarkable achievement, a testament to Marshall’s knowledge, skill and spirit.

In response to an art historical narrative that failed to represent him, Marshall studied and mastered its shape. And in a composite visual language, weaved from threads of Théodore Géricault and Frank Stella, Giotto and Piet Mondrian, Marshall tells his story, the story of black America. A portrait, a love letter, a celebration, and a battle cry. 

Kerry James Marshall: Mastry” is on view at The Met Breuer until Jan. 29, 2017.

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The Vvorks Of Mr Stephen Marshall, Late Minister Of The Gospel At Finching-field In Essex. And Since At Ipswitch In Suffolk. The F

The Vvorks Of Mr Stephen Marshall, Late Minister Of The Gospel At Finching-field In Essex. And Since At Ipswitch In Suffolk. The F


This book represents an authentic reproduction of the text as printed by the original publisher. While we have attempted to accurately maintain the integrity of the original work, there are sometimes problems with the original work or the micro-film from which the books were digitized. This can result in errors in reproduction. Possible imperfections include missing and blurred pages, poor pictures, markings and other reproduction issues beyond our control. Because this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment to protecting, preserving and promoting the world''s literature. ++++The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification:++++The vvorks of Mr Stephen Marshall, late minister of the Gospel at Finching-Field in Essex. And since at Ipswitch in Suffolk. The first part. Viz. I. Of Christ''s intercession. And of sins of infirmity. II. The high priviledge of beleeversMarshall, Stephen, 1594?-1655.The final leaf is blank.[18], 152, 78, [2] p.London : printed by Peter Cole, and Edward Cole, printers and book-sellers, at the sign of the Printing-press in Cornhil near the Royal Exchange, 1661.Wing (2nd ed.) / M747EnglishReproduction of the original in the Bodleian Library++++This book represents an authentic reproduction of the text as printed by the original publisher. While we have attempted to accurately maintain the integrity of the original work, there are sometimes problems with the original work or the micro-film from which the books were digitized. This can result in errors in reproduction. Possible imperfections include missing and blurred pages, poor pictures, markings and other reproduction issues beyond our control. Because this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment to protecting, preserving and promoting the world''s literature.
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Marshall – 100w Combo Amplifier – Black

Marshall – 100w Combo Amplifier – Black


Make your music rock with this Marshall 100W combo amplifier that features two 12″ speakers and digital and analog technologies for rich, powerful sound. Four programmable channels allow easy customization.

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Writings of Frank Marshall Davis

Writings of Frank Marshall Davis


Frank Marshall Davis (1905-1987) was a central figure in the black press, working as reporter and editor for the Atlanta World, the Associated Negro Press, the Chicago Star, and the Honolulu Record. Writings of Frank Marshall Davis presents a selection of Davis’s nonfiction, providing an unprecedented insight into one journalist’s ability to reset the terms of public conversation and frame the news to open up debate among African Americans and all Americans. During the middle of the twentieth century, Davis set forth a radical vision that challenged the status quo. His commentary on race relations, music, literature, and American culture was precise, impassioned, and engaged. At the height of World War II, Davis boldly questioned the nature of America’s potential postwar relations and what they meant for African Americans and the nation. His work challenged the usefulness of race as a social construct, and he eventually disavowed the idea of race altogether. Throughout his career, he championed the struggles of African Americans for equal rights and laboring people seeking fair wages and other benefits. In his reviews on music, he argued that blues and jazz were responses to social conditions and served as weapons of racial integration. His book reviews complemented his radical vision by commenting on how literature reshapes one’s understanding of the world. Even his travel writings on Hawaii called for cultural pluralism and tolerance for racial and economic difference. Writings of Frank Marshall Davis reveals a writer in touch with the most salient issues defining his era and his desire to insert them into the public sphere. John Edgar Tidwell provides an introduction and contextual notes on each major subject area Davis explored. John Edgar Tidwell is an associate professor of English at the University of Kansas. He edited Frank Marshall Davis’s Livin’ the Blues: Memoirs of a Black Journalist and Poet and his Black Moods: Collected Poems.

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The Spirit of the Marshall Plan: Taking Action Against World Hunger, School Lunches for Kids Around the World

The Spirit of the Marshall Plan: Taking Action Against World Hunger, School Lunches for Kids Around the World


Invoking the same spirit that fueled the Marshall Plan to rebuild Europe, author William Lambers calls for a global school lunch program to fight child hunger. 300 million children suffer from hunger worldwide. School lunch programs fight child hunger and also boost school attendance and performance. This book highlights the use of school lunch programs in Europe following World War II and how they can be used today in countries like Afghanistan, Kenya, Guatemala and Sudan. The future of these nations depends on a nourished and educated youth. Special attention is given to the work of charities such as Food for the Poor, Childslife International and the World Food Program. Supporting the U.S. government McGovern-Dole Food for Education program is seen as key to ensuring every child around the globe can receive a school lunch. McGovern-Dole helps fund the work of the World Food Program, Catholic Relief Services and other organizations that carry out school lunch programs in developing countries.

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Unique Photo – Save $30 on the Marshall HDMI On-Camera Monitor!

Save $ 30 on the Marshall V-LCD50 – HDMI 5 On-Camera Monitor V-LCD50 – HDMI! This offer is valid now through 8/31/2011 with coupon code: UPMARSHALL5
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Unique Photo – Save $30 on the Marshall HDMI On-Camera Monitor!

Save $ 30 on the Marshall V-LCD50 – HDMI 5 On-Camera Monitor V-LCD50 – HDMI! This offer is valid now through 8/31/2011 with coupon code: UPMARSHALL5
Code: UPMARSHALL5
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Unique Photo – Save $30 on the Marshall HDMI On-Camera Monitor!

Save $ 30 on the Marshall V-LCD50 – HDMI 5 On-Camera Monitor V-LCD50 – HDMI! This offer is valid now through 8/31/2011 with coupon code: UPMARSHALL5
Code: UPMARSHALL5
Begin: 2012-10-11 11:00:00
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Unique Photo – Save $30 on the Marshall HDMI On-Camera Monitor!

Save $ 30 on the Marshall V-LCD50 – HDMI 5 On-Camera Monitor V-LCD50 – HDMI! This offer is valid now through 8/31/2011 with coupon code: UPMARSHALL5
Code: UPMARSHALL5
Begin: 2012-10-11 11:00:00
Expire: 0000-00-00 00:00:00
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Unique Photo – Save $30 on the Marshall HDMI On-Camera Monitor!

Save $ 30 on the Marshall V-LCD50 – HDMI 5 On-Camera Monitor V-LCD50 – HDMI! This offer is valid now through 8/31/2011 with coupon code: UPMARSHALL5
Code: UPMARSHALL5
Begin: 2012-10-11 11:00:00
Expire: 0000-00-00 00:00:00
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