Critic’s Notebook: One Last Time, McCain Counterprograms Trump

The senator’s memorials laid out his vision of civic life, and said a lot, indirectly, about someone who was conspicuous by his absence.
NYT > Arts

SPECIAL TRAVEL DISCOUNTS:
Orbitz Worldwide Inc

McCain Family Attends Public Viewing to Hug and Exchange Stories with Thousands of Mourners

Sen. John McCain‘s children and members of the public mourned his death, together, at the Arizona State Capitol in Phoenix on Wednesday evening.

After attending a private ceremony for family and friends in the afternoon, three of McCain’s seven children — Sidney, Jack and Jimmy — returned to the rotunda to hug and share stories with those waiting in line at the public viewing. According to the Arizona Department of Public Safety, some 12,000-15,000 waited in line to say goodbye in the sweltering heat, CBS News reported.

Emotional footage from a local NBC station showed mourners thanking the children for their father’s service and Sidney, 51, telling one woman waiting in line, “It’s so incredible that all of you are here.” Another man could be heard telling Sidney, “It’s the least that we can do for a great man like that.”

Meanwhile Jack, 32, made the rounds offering hugs and handshakes, including one to a little boy holding an American flag.

The family and friends of John McCain paid their respects to the late six-term senator and decorated veteran earlier Wednesday, during a private memorial service at the state capitol.

Meghan McCain, the senator’s daughter, and Cindy McCain, his wife of 38 years, were both at the service and wept over his casket. At one point, Cindy tenderly placed her cheek against the flag draped over her husband’s coffin.

RELATED: Meghan McCain Breaks Down in Tears Over Her Father’s Casket as Senator’s Funeral Services Begin

The McCain family announced on Friday that the six-term Arizona senator had decided, “with his usual strength of will,” to discontinue medical treatment for stage-four brain cancer.

Just one day later, McCain died at the age of 81.

RELATED VIDEO: Senator John McCain Dies at Age 81

McCain will lie in state at the state capitol through Thursday. There will then be a public procession to carry his casket to the North Phoenix Baptist Church for a 10 a.m. local time service. Senator McCain’s family and friends, along with state, local and tribal officials, and business and civic leaders from across Arizona were invited to attend.

There will then be a public viewing in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda Friday afternoon before the casket is transported to Maryland for a private service at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis on Sunday.

RELATED: John McCain’s 2008 Running Mate Sarah Palin Is Not Invited to His Funeral: ‘It’s Sad’

Following her father’s death, Meghan, 33, shared a touching tribute on social media.

“In the thirty-three years we shared together, he raised me, taught me, corrected me, comforted me, encouraged me, and supported me in all things,” she wrote. “He taught me how to live. His love and his care, ever present, always unfailing, took me from a girl to a woman — and he showed me what it is to be a man.”

Meghan and John McCainSierra Blanco Photography

“All that I am is thanks to him,” she continued in her tribute. “Now that he is gone, the task of my lifetime is to live up to his example, his expectations, and his love. My father’s passing comes with sorrow and grief for me, for my mother, for my brothers, and for my sisters. He was a great fire who burned bright, and we lived in his light and warmth for so very long. We know that his flame lives on, in each of us. The days and years to come will not be the same without my dad — but they will be good days, filled with life and love, because of the example he lived for us.”

RELATED: Meghan McCain Shares Touching Tribute to Late Father: ‘All That I Am Is Thanks to Him’

Cindy also mourned the loss on social media. “My heart is broken,” tweeted Cindy, 64, minutes after her family announced the late senator’s death.

“I am so lucky to have lived the adventure of loving this incredible man for 38 years,” she continued. “He passed the way he lived, on his own terms, surrounded by the people he loved, in the place he loved best.”


PEOPLE.com

Fashion Deals Update:

Meghan McCain Shares Touching Tribute to Late Father: ‘All That I Am Is Thanks to Him’

Following Sen. John McCain’s death at age 81 on Saturday after a battle with stage-four brain cancer, the late political maverick and war hero’s daughter Meghan McCain shared a touching tribute on social media.

In a message she captioned “I love you forever – my beloved father @SenJohnMcCain,” Meghan, 33, revealed that she was by her father’s side as he “departed this life today.”

“In the thirty-three years we shared together, he raised me, taught me, corrected me, comforted me, encouraged me, and supported me in all things,” she wrote. “He taught me how to live. His love and his care, ever present, always unfailing, took me from a girl to a woman — and he showed me what it is to be a man.”

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

When planning her wedding to Ben Domenech last fall, Meghan pushed the date forward in the wake of her father’s cancer diagnosis. Despite his tenuous health, the ailing senator was on hand for his daughter’s big day.

RELATED VIDEO: Sen. John McCain, Maverick Politician and Decorated War Veteran, Dies at 81

“All that I am is thanks to him,” she continued in her tribute. “Now that he is gone, the task of my lifetime is to live up to his example, his expectations, and his love. My father’s passing comes with sorrow and grief for me, for my mother, for my brothers, and for my sisters. He was a great fire who burned bright, and we lived in his light and warmth for so very long. We know that his flame lives on, in each of us. The days and years to come will not be the same without my dad — but they will be good days, filled with life and love, because of the example he lived for us.”

RELATED: John McCain Dead at 81: Obama, Biden, Trump and More Pay Their Respects to the War Hero Senator

Cindy McCain, the Senator’s wife of 38 years, also mourned the loss on social media.

“My heart is broken,” tweeted Cindy, 64, minutes after her family announced his death.

“I am so lucky to have lived the adventure of loving this incredible man for 38 years,” she continued. “He passed the way he lived, on his own terms, surrounded by the people he loved, in the place he loved best.”

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Sen. McCain, the former POW and outspoken Republican politician nicknamed The Maverick for being unafraid to disagree with fellow members of his party, died at 4:28 p.m. on Saturday, his family announced in a statement, according to NBC News.

McCain is survived by wife Cindy, and his children: Douglas, Andrew, and Sidney (all with first wife Carol McCain) and Meghan, Jack, James, and Bridget, with Cindy.

On Friday, his family said that Sen. McCain, “with his usual strength of will,” decided to stop treatment for the stage-four brain cancer he had been battling since its diagnosis last summer.

“In the year since,” the McCain family said, “John has surpassed expectations for his survival. But the progress of disease and the inexorable advance of age render their verdict.”


PEOPLE.com

Fashion Deals Update:

Books of The Times: In ‘The Restless Wave,’ John McCain Says America Is Still Exceptional

In his latest and likely last book, McCain expresses concern about the state of the union, but generally stops short of calling out President Trump.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

By the Book: John McCain: By the Book

Senator John McCain, whose new book is “The Restless Wave,” thinks all children should read “Huckleberry Finn”: “It’s funny and it’s scary, and it teaches us to see past our differences.”
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Al Franken Relives Dramatic Moment John McCain Voted No On GOP Health Care Bill

“Everyone stopped.”
Comedy
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Mobile Playboy today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

John McCain Tells PEOPLE How He Survived His 5 Years as a POW: ‘Faith in God, My Fellow Prisoners, and My Country’

Whether or not you agree with John McCain’s politics, there’s one thing about the 80-year-old Arizona lawmaker—who was recently diagnosed with brain cancer—that seems indisputable: the man is tough as nails.

The former Navy pilot is often described as a “war hero” in the media on account of the horrors he braved after his A-4 Skyhawk was shot down in October 1967 during a bombing run over Hanoi and taken prisoner by the North Vietnamese.

But the story of his capture and his five and a half years he spent fighting for his life and defying his captors in the notorious “Hanoi Hilton” prison camp are even more inspiring when you hear the gritty details of what McCain endured—and his account of how he managed to survive.

“The plane was gyrating violently and heading straight down, very fast, at about 500 knots,” McCain told PEOPLE during a lengthy interview in 1992 on the back porch of his home in Arizona, describing the hellish moments that elapsed after a surface-to-air missile blasted the wing off his jet.

It was his 23rd bombing mission over Hanoi and the 30-year-old lieutenant commander knew his only hope of survival was to bail out of the burning, doomed aircraft as it plummeted straight toward the ground. “When I ejected, the pressure flailed my arms back and that’s what broke my arms,” he recalled. “My knee obviously hit something on the way out and I ended up breaking my leg, too.”

His parachute opened and, as fate would have it, he drifted down into a lake in the middle of the city he’d been sent to bomb. “When they pulled me up on the bank, lots and lots of people started coming around,” he said. “They were pretty steamed, which is understandable since we’d just finished bombing the place. They bayoneted me in the foot and the crotch and were spitting at me, hollering and shouting.”

A group of soldiers finally arrived as locals were in the midst of beating him with a rifle butt, dumped him onto a stretcher, which was loaded on the back of a truck. He was eventually driven to the massive prison complex built by the French in 1945 where numerous American pilots were tortured and interrogated during the Vietnam War.

‘They got nothing out of me’

“They left me on the floor of a cell for four days, during which time I lapsed in and out of consciousness,” McCain said. “Their policy was that they wouldn’t provide any medical treatment unless you gave them military information. I would only give them my name, rank, serial number and date of birth. And so, after about four days on the floor of the cell, they got nothing out of me because I kept passing out.”

His captors eventually took him to a run-down hospital and operated on his knee, cutting most of his ligaments and cartilage, and placing his right arm in a chest cast. “The important thing they gave me was blood, ” he said. “I was in shock and they gave me transfusions, which gave me strength. But I wasn’t well-treated by the guards, who ate all my food and I slowly started getting worse.”

One afternoon, one of his interrogators appeared in his room and said, “‘The doctors tell me you aren’t getting well.’ I told him the only way I’d survive is if they put me in with some Americans,” he recalled. “That night they took me out of the hospital and put me in a cell with two other prisoners. Those two guys took care of me.”

After six months, the badly-injured flyer was able to walk with crutches—which inadvertently made life worse for him. “Letting them see I could walk was a mistake on my part,” he said. “They put me in solitary confinement for more than two years after that.”

McCain’s windowless ten-foot-by-ten-foot cell had a sheet metal roof that was transformed into a scorching oven in Hanoi’s sweltering summer heat. By mid-1968, his father was named commander of all U.S. Forces in Vietnam and his captors offered to send him home. Despite his desperation, McCain realized the gesture was purely a ploy meant to demoralize his fellow prisoners. After a bit of soul searching, he told the Vietnamese he was staying put and refused to leave the prison.

“They were astounded that I would refuse,” he said. “I’m not downplaying how difficult that decision was for me, but I did it because I thought I could survive—even though I was in pretty bad shape. But our code of conduct clearly states, ‘You do not accept parole. Sick and injured prisoners must be released first and others are to be released only by order of capture.”

Life got even more difficult after he spurned their offer. “After I refused to go home, they treated me pretty badly,” recalled McCain, who by then had begun suffering from dysentery and was being beaten every two hours in order to get him to sign confessions and make audio recording trashing America. “That was a pretty tough period. They were going after me pretty hard.”

In order to keep his sanity, McCain, like other POWs, took great risks tapping out messages to fellow prisoners on the prison walls. When caught, he paid a heavy price with additional beatings and removal to even worse prison camps. “I was put in another prison we called ‘The Plantation,’” he recalls. “And for seven or eight months I was sent to a really crummy prison outside of Hanoi for punishment that was known as ‘Skid Row.’”

‘Three things kept me going’

Despite the lack of food, recurring dysentery, his various injuries, and the uncertainty of when his next beating might occur, McCain managed to stay alive. “Three things kept me going,” he said. “Faith in God, faith in my fellow prisoners and faith in my country.

RELATED VIDEO: Meghan McCain Makes Emotional Tribute to Her Father While Fiercely Batting Back Twitter Trolls

Of his five and a half years in captivity, one event that has remained forever etched in McCain’s mind, he says, occurred in December 1972 when U.S. Air Force B-52 bombers roared over Hanoi and other parts of the country, and began dropping over 20,000 tons of explosives. “That’s when we knew one of two things,” he said. “Either we weren’t going to get out of there at all, or the war was reaching its conclusion.”

When he was finally released in March 1973, McCain earned the dubious distinction of being the most injured pilot to have survived the North Vietnamese prison camps. The ordeal, he insisted, didn’t impact him the way it did so many other former POWs from the Vietnam War. By 1982, he’d begun his political career and won a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

“Unlike some, I was fortunate that I was able to put it all behind me when I came home,” he said. “People ask me how long did it take to readjust? It took me about 45 minutes. I never had a nightmare or a flashback or anything like that. I know a lot of my friends were not so fortunate, who never fully came back from that experience. But I did.”

His physical injuries are another matter. Asked if he still suffered pain from his various broken bones, McCain, whose injuries left him unable to raise his arms above his head, just shrugged. “Probably my shoulder hurts me more than my knee does,” he said. “I’ve definitely got some arthritis from the damage that was done. But I can get around fairly well. And I can always tell when it’s going to rain.”

With that, he flashed a mischievous grin and, in what seems ironic given the climate in Washington, D.C., of late, replied: “Luckily, in my line of work, there’s not a lot of heavy lifting.”


PEOPLE.com

Fashion Deals Update:

George Takei Has A Revelation About John McCain And Severus Snape

“Only if Susan Collins is McGonagall and Lisa Murkowski, Mrs Weasley.”
Entertainment News, Photos and Videos – HuffPost Entertainment
Visit Gabby Love today for the hottest fashion entertainment online!
Ashley Madison - Have an affair. Married Dating, Affairs, Married Women, Extramarital Affair

Hollywood Reacts to Obamacare Repeal’s Defeat: ‘John McCain Put Country Over Party’

Hollywood was dismayed, with the majority of filmmakers and stars erupting in joy, after the Senate rejected on Friday morning the latest effort to repeal Obamacare. Arizona Sen. John McCain cast the deciding vote and refused to support the measure, joining two other Republican senators: Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska. No… Read more »

Variety

SHOPPING DISCOUNT UPDATE:

EXCLUSIVE Look At Donald Trump’s Military Record In Light Of His Comments On John McCain

Pew pew pew! 

On Saturday, presidential candidate and Mexico’s favorite piñata Donald Trump made some particularly nasty comments about Senator John McCain over his POW experience. Trump said McCain is only a “war hero because he was captured.”

After considerable blowback, Trump remained firm, saying on Sunday that he will not apologize for the comments.

HuffPost has ALL CAPS EXCLUSIVELY ALL CAPS obtained Trump’s own personal military record for comparison:

 

 

Also on HuffPost:

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Comedy – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Mobile Playboy today for the hottest adult entertainment online!