Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial SlurNicomi Stewart, a mother in Rochester, New York, is “disgusted” after an automated call sent to her phone from the city’s school district mispronounced her daughter’s name as a racial slur.



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How the Hell Did Walmart Wind Up With a Racial Slur on Its Site?

This isn’t the first time a third party seller has caused trouble.

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Walmart.com Apologizes for Racial Slur in Product Caption

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. today had to apologize after a vendor’s product was discovered with a caption the retailer called “appalling.”
A third-party vendor on walmart.com, the retailer’s marketplace, used a racial slur to describe the color of a product, a protective cap designed to be worn as a layer in between a person’s real hair and sewn-in hair extensions. The item was brought to light by a Twitter user.
“We are very sorry and appalled that this third-party seller listed their item with this description on our online marketplace,” a Wal-Mart spokeswoman said. “It’s a clear violation of our policy. The product has been removed and we’re investigating the seller to determine how this could have happened.”
The world’s largest retailer moved quickly to defuse the situation, replacing the “Add to Cart” button with a sold-out notice and disclaimer beneath the product that said, “While we aim to provide accurate product information, it is provided by manufacturers, suppliers and others, and has not been verified by us.”
This isn’t the first time Wal-Mart has had to pull an offensive or controversial product from its virtual shelves. A coffee mug that said “Got Retard?” a Christmas 2016 offering. The product, which was reportedly also sold

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Bill Maher’s Ex-Girlfriend Has Advice For Him On Using A Racial Slur

An ex-girlfriend has a recommendation for Bill Maher whenever the “Real Time” host next ponders using a racial slur: Don’t.

Coco Johnsen, a model who dated Maher in the early 2000s, told TMZ Wednesday that anyone who uses the slur is “very insensitive” and had specific advice for her former beau.

Just use another word next time,” said Johnsen, who is black. “I’m sure that he’s learned his lesson. Maybe a little sensitivity training at the NAACP could do some use.”

A TMZ interviewer attempted to pin down whether Maher used the word around Johnsen, who later sued the comic for palimony, but she didn’t take the bait.

Last week on his show, Maher jokingly referred to himself as a “house n****r” in a talk with Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.). The comedian apologized after intense backlash that resulted in Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) canceling his scheduled appearance on the show.

In 2005, a judge dismissed Johnsen’s $ 9 million suit claiming Maher had promised to marry her and support her lifestyle. 

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A Tesla employee is suing the company over claims of racial harassment and discrimination

A Tesla employee is suing the company over claims of racial harassment and discriminationA Tesla employee is suing the company, saying he experienced racial harassment, racial…



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Schilling: Jones is lying about racial taunts (Yahoo Sports)

Curt Schilling believes Adam Jones is lying about racial taunts

Curt Schilling doesn’t believe anyone at Fenway Park shouted slurs at Orioles outfielder Adam Jones.



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Drake blasts Grammys over ‘racial profiling’

Drake has accused Grammy organisers of racial profiling, for labelling his music as rap due to the colour of his skin.
Entertainment News – Latest Celebrity & Showbiz News | Sky News

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The Sinews For Racial Development…

The Sinews For Racial Development…


This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections

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or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections,

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<title> The Sinews For Racial Development<author> Akaiko Akana<subjects> Travel; United States; West; Pacific; Hawaii; Travel / United States / West / Pacific
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Dusty Rhodes Bridged the Racial Divide

My family moved to Georgia from Vermont when I was seven, in late 1971. It was quite a culture shock as both my parents were ultra-liberal poodle kissing bed wetters.

Then, in early 1972, after several months without a TV, we got a nineteen inch black and white Curtis Mathes.

It was then that my brother and I discovered two things; Johnny Carson and Georgia Championship Wrestling, hosted by the “Dean” of wrestling announcers, the late great Gordon Solie.

Like all good pro wrestling shows, there were bad guys and good guys. The bad guys had names like Abdullah “The Butcher” and Ox Baker. The good guys had names like Tony Atlas and Dusty Rhodes “The American Dream.”

At that time probably the biggest name in wrestling was Andre “The Giant,” the massive Frenchman who stood over seven feet tall and weighed over four hundred pounds. But in the Deep South there was nobody more loved in the squared circle than Dusty Rhodes.

Rhodes, a great blond bear of a man, was even more entertaining as he bantered with Gordon Solie, than he was in the ring. In his banter, Rhodes was a beacon of positivity and all things good. As his nickname, “The American Dream” implied. And the small but rabidly enthusiastic studio audience gobbled Rhodes up.

It was obvious that Rhodes’ act borrowed heavily from then hugely popular boxer and global icon Muhammad Ali. Like Ali, Rhodes frequently referenced his own good looks and sexual prowess. “I can make luv like James Bond!” Rhodes would croon into the microphone. Heady stuff for an eight year old.

Rhodes even had his own version of the “Ali shuffle,” which he called the “Rhodes shuffle.” Duh.
To further thicken the stew, I once saw Ali being interviewed by Howard Cosell, and he told Cosell that he had developed his own bombastic style of self promotion, after watching a performance by the legendary wrestler of the 1940s and 50s, “Gorgeous George.”

Ali said, at nineteen he met “Gorgeous George” and George told him people pay to see someone try to “shut me up.” He told Ali to “Keep talking, keep sassing” and “always be outrageous.” Mission accomplished.

So, for those keeping score, Dusty Rhodes was a white country boy from Texas, imitating a black man from Kentucky, Ali, imitating a white man from Nebraska, “Gorgeous George.”

If “Gorgeous George” was imitating someone, Wikipedia failed to mention it.

During the 1990s, years after Georgia Championship Wrestling had gone off the air and after Rhodes had retired, I had the honor of meeting Dusty Rhodes in person. I had just walked into the house of Atlanta comedian James Gregory, for his annual Christmas party, and, in the kitchen, wearing a baseball cap, was Dusty Rhodes. My knees almost buckled. I walked up and started blabbering about Georgia Championship Wrestling and Gordon Solie and who knows what I said.
Mr. Rhodes could not have been nicer. I wish I could remember what he said, but I was so nervous I didn’t know what was going on.

I do recall that I asked about the series of vertical scars on his forehead and he explained that early in his career, he would sometimes have a pin taped to his index finger and he would intentionally scratch his own forehead, during matches, to make the blood flow. That tells you all you need to know about how tough Dusty Rhodes really was.

Dusty Rhodes the man may be gone, but “The American Dream” will never die.

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Racial Healing, Scandal and Popular Culture

“The stories we tell each other, the gossip we pass, and the media representation of events shape the meaning of our lives.” – -Rachel Godsil, Brianna Goodale, Perception Institute

The story of the brutal and untimely death of civil rights activist Jimmie Lee Jackson of Marion, Alabama, has been referenced in speeches, history books and news articles since that tragic day in 1965. But, when stories are told by a member of that community as in Ava DuVernay’s Selma film portrayal, the power of those authentic stories can touch hearts, open minds, mobilize masses and create opportunities for healing.

In the past two years, some of our nation’s most influential movies and television shows have dealt with racism and bias. From Fruitvale Station to Selma, Scandal to House of Cards, celebrated writers, actors and directors have brought these issues to the mainstream. This has all been accompanied by a drumbeat crescendo of news and analysis that goes beyond specific incidents to examine the roots of these issues and the trends that reinforce them.

For those of us who work for racial equity and healing each day, this is an encouraging trend and an opportunity, especially given Hollywood’s historical lack of support for people of color in front of and behind its cameras. As writers and producers become more diverse, they bring their own experiences, relationships and networks — resulting in well-crafted storylines with recognizable experiences.

These important pop culture moments may seem separate from our day-to-day lives, but stories matter. Research from the Perception Institute says that “culture plays an important role in reinforcing implicit bias, increasing our racial anxieties and undermining conversations about racial equality and opportunity.” And we also know that accurate, honest pop culture narratives can successfully combat stereotypes.

In just the past few weeks, the hit shows Scandal and House of Cards have addressed issues of race, while the 87th Annual Academy Awards became the subject of criticism for failing to include any black actors or directors and few others of color. On Scandal, we witnessed the gripping tale of an unarmed black teen fatally shot by a police officer and a father’s anguish when sitting over his son’s body calling out “He didn’t carry a knife” repeatedly to an ever-growing crowd. The protagonist, Olivia Pope, hired to help diffuse the situation, speaks truth to the police chief when he starts to ready the riot gear: “There is a dead child lying in the street in front of their homes. What would you do if there was a dead child, a child you knew, lying in the street in front of your home? The fact that they stand in groups and say things you do not like does not make them a mob … it makes them Americans.”

In true television fashion, justice comes swiftly when we learn that the knife was planted but not before the officer reveals his biases in a rant: “The truth is, those people in Rosemead have no respect for anything or anyone … Brandon Parker is dead because he didn’t have respect, because those people out there who are chanting and crying over his body, they didn’t teach him the right values.”

Those last few minutes say so much, an officer classifying entire swaths of a community, making a claim that a young child threatened his safety — and having that claim not be questioned, the chief having to be reminded that those gathered and grieving have the right to do so. It’s difficult for me to imagine how any viewer no matter what race would not have been moved by the pain generated in those moments. Importantly, if the media were able to capture the stories of parents, families and communities mourning the needless deaths of Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, Eric Gardner, Weinjian Lu, Rafael Ramos, Deah Shaddy Barakay, Yusor Mohammad and Razan Mohammad Abu-Salha and countless others, change might come about more swiftly.

Yet another timely example was how House of Cards used one its lead characters — the powerful and confident White House Chief of Staff “Remy” — to depict the horror, shame and powerlessness felt by so many men of color in the face of police bias. In a telling scene, Remy was pulled over by local police without apparent cause, arrested and slammed onto the hood of his vehicle just blocks from his post at the White House.

The trend is showing no signs of slowing down. The reactions to the Justice Department’s recent investigations, and the most recent high profile police killing of an unarmed black teen show that these issues will remain a part of the national conversation. Those reactions will continue to shape the stories we tell.

For five years, my colleagues at the W.K Kellogg Foundation, other foundations, our grantees and communities around the nation have generated tangible examples of what change looks like when people have the space to heal and work together for a better world. We embrace those who tell unvarnished stories about the impact of biases, the rich contributions of all people of color, and the benefits of an inclusive playing field. Pop culture is a forum where people are both entertained and enlightened. It simultaneously reflects the culture and pushes it forward. Let’s harness these moments by leveraging your water cooler conversations, social media platforms or mealtime discussions to highlight the impact of our unique stories. We can reimagine and refocus the narrative about people of color in this country, fostering a dialogue built on the equal and inherent value of all people, particularly men, women and children of color.
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How Sidney Poitier Overcame Racial Dogma | The Oprah Winfrey Show | OWN

Original airdate: April 7, 2000

Find out how Sidney Poitier overcame the prejudices of the era on his path to becoming a movie icon.

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Oprah Winfrey Network is the first and only network named for, and inspired by, a single iconic leader. Oprah Winfrey’s heart and creative instincts inform the brand — and the magnetism of the channel.

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Winfrey provides leadership in programming and attracts superstar talent to join her in primetime, building a global community of like-minded viewers and leading that community to connect on social media and beyond. OWN is a singular destination on cable. Depth with edge. Heart. Star power. Connection. And endless possibilities.

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Racial Indigestion

Racial Indigestion


The act of eating is both erotic and violent, as one wholly consumes the object being eaten. At the same time, eating performs a kind of vulnerability to the world, revealing a fundamental interdependence between the eater and that which exists outside her body. Racial Indigestion explores the links between food, visual and literary culture in the nineteenth-century United States to reveal how eating produces political subjects by justifying the social discourses that create bodily meaning. Combing through a visually stunning and rare archive of children’s literature, architectural history, domestic manuals, dietetic tracts, novels and advertising, Racial Indigestion tells the story of the consolidation of nationalist mythologies of whiteness via the erotic politics of consumption. Less a history of commodities than a history of eating itself, the book seeks to understand how eating became a political act, linked to appetite, vice, virtue, race and class inequality and, finally, the queer pleasures and pitfalls of a burgeoning commodity culture. In so doing, Racial Indigestion sheds light on contemporary “foodie” culture’s vexed relationship to nativism, nationalism and race privilege.

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