Sex and the City star in tears over racism faced by her children

Sex and the City star Kristin Davis has broken down as she recalled instances of racism faced by her adopted children.
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Dolce & Gabbana show cancelled over ‘racism’ row

Dolce & Gabbana has apologised after being accused of making racist remarks about China on social media – but claims its accounts were hacked.
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Dolce & Gabbana Cancels China Show Amid Racism Controversy

Stefano Gabbana, Domenico DolceAmid mounting controversy, Dolce & Gabbana’s “The Great Show” has been called off.
According to multiple reports, the Italian luxury fashion brand’s show, marketed…

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Morrissey cancels UK gigs amid racism row

Morrissey’s UK and European tour dates next month have been postponed due to “logistical problems”.
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Books of The Times: A True-Crime Mystery From the 1950s, Fueled by Racism and Corruption

Gilbert King’s “Beneath a Ruthless Sun” recounts the tangled case that ensued after the wife of a Florida citrus baron said she was raped.
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‘Racism is fine,’ says Reddit’s chief executive

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‘Bambi’ Artist Who Endured America’s Racism Finally Gets His Due

The late Tyrus Wong, whose paintings formed the basis of Disney’s iconic film, is finally receiving the recognition he deserves.
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‘Bambi’ Artist Who Endured America’s Racism Finally Gets His Due

The late Tyrus Wong, whose paintings formed the basis of Disney’s iconic film, is finally receiving the recognition he deserves.
Arts
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Mayweather on McGregor: ‘Racism still exists’ (Yahoo Sports)

Floyd Mayweather on Conor McGregor’s racial comments: 'It's totally disrespectful'

Conor McGregor’s bizarre antics finally cross the line in Floyd Mayweather’s eyes.



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Shoe Company Gianvito Rossi Accused of Racism Against Serena Williams

Luxury shoe brand Gianvito Rossi is accused of racism against Serena Williams in a shocking ex-employee letter.
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Further Reading: A History of Race and Racism in America, in 24 Chapters

A decade-by-decade history of race and racism in America, compiled by a National Book Award Winner.
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Jordan Peele on a Truly Terrifying Monster: Racism

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Nicki Minaj Says ‘Racism’ Is The Reason This Designer Won’t Take Her Call

Giuseppe, what’s good? 

Nicki Minaj put the acclaimed Italian luxury shoe designer Giuseppe Zanotti on blast Friday after the brand’s PR people apparently refused to take Minaj’s call. 

The rapper unleashed a tweetstorm about the incident, and here’s how it went down: 

[Editor’s note: Minaj did wear the sneakers, though it appears she wore them for Glamour in 2011.] 

The 34-year-old entertainer’s problems with Zanotti arose when she found out the designer was making capsule collections with other artists (most recently Zayn Malik and Jennifer Lopez), which would presumably give the collaborator a share of the shoe’s profits. 

Minaj claimed that because she was black, she could only “inspire” Zanotti, but not partner with him: 

Minaj retweeted a fan’s photo of some of the “Nicki” shoes that show up when you search for them in the designer’s collection: 

Toward the end of her Twitter call-out, Minaj said she wouldn’t permit this “racism and disrespect.” She called on her fans to start Tweeting or Instagramming the hashtag #GiuseppeWhatsGood, a reference to her famous line to Miley Cyrus at the MTV Awards. 

Soon enough, her #Giuseppe hashtag was trending on Twitter: 

Minaj again clarified to fans that is wasn’t about the money, “just the disrespect:”  

UPDATE, 3:21 p.m.:  Zanotti appears to have taken the “Nicki” shoes down from his website, which led to another round of tweets from Minaj: 

The Huffington Post reached out to Minaj and Zanotti and will update this post accordingly. 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Style – The Huffington Post
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Rockette Says Inauguration Performance Is ‘An Issue Of Racism And Sexism’

On Dec. 22, news broke that the Rockettes would be performing at President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration in January.

Initially, it was reported that some of the dancers were contractually obligated to perform at the ceremony, despite expressing that they did not want to. The Madison Square Garden Company pushed back on that on Friday, announcing in a statement that every Rockette must “voluntarily sign up” for every event she performs in.  

But some Rockettes say they still fear for their jobs if they sit this performance out. Now one Rockette is publicly speaking out about the controversy.

In an interview with Marie Claire published Tuesday, a Rockette ― using the pseudonym “Mary” to protect her identity ―  discussed the turmoil going on behind the scenes in the wake of the famous dance troupe’s commitment to perform at Trump’s inauguration.

“This is making our show, our job, our name, branded as right-wing. An extreme right-wing,” Mary told Marie Claire. “There’s a reason why everyone else is turning this down. Why are we not?”

This is making our show, our job, our name, branded as right-wing. An extreme right-wing.

Mary told Marie Claire that many of the dancers first found out about the performance through text messages sent from friends. One dancer felt as though she was being “forced to perform for this monster,” Mary said, while another woman reportedly wrote in an email to the dancers: “I wouldn’t feel comfortable standing near a man like that in our costumes.” (The Rockettes often perform in revealing costumes, and Trump has both bragged about grabbing women “by the pussy” without their consent and been accused of sexual assault by more than a dozen women.) 

According to Mary, some of the dancers initially were obligated to perform at the inauguration. But after the backlash on social media from dancers and fans, the company quickly made participation optional. 

Unfortunately, many of the dancers are still afraid they’ll be penalized for not performing at inauguration. “It will be interesting to see who doesn’t get their job back,” Mary said. “If I had to lose my job over this, I would. It’s too important. And I think the rest of the performing arts community would happily stand behind me. 

Mary admitted that the lack of women of color in the kick line is “embarrassing” already, adding that, “it’s almost worse to have 18 pretty white girls behind this man who supports so many hate groups.” 

The Rockette said that this performance is not about politics, it’s about human rights. “This is not a Republican or Democrat issue ― this is a women’s rights issue,” she said. “This is an issue of racism and sexism, something that’s much bigger than politics.”

Head over to Marie Claire to read the full interview. 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Style – The Huffington Post
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Museum’s ‘Kimono Wednesdays’ Cancelled After Claims Of Racism

“Kimono Wednesdays” sounds more like an ill-advised sorority ritual than sanctioned museum programming. And yet, this month, at the MFA Boston, museumgoers lined up to touch and try on kimonos in front of Claude Monet’s “La Japonaise.”

It wasn’t long before protestors spoke out both on social media and on the museum grounds, dubbing the initiative to be culturally insensitive and racist. Critics pointed out that, even worse, the garments on display were actually uchikake, not kimonos. Insert forehead slap.

As a result of the outrage, the MFA swiftly canceled “Kimono Wednesdays,” which was scheduled to continue until July 29.

Originally imagined to accompany Monet’s “La Japonaise,” a painting of the artist’s wife Camille Doncieux posing with a fan and kimono, the program encouraged visitors to ”channel your inner Camille Monet” by posing in similar garb. 

What’s strange is that Monet’s piece is often interpreted as a satirical response to the absurd, fetishistic craze of the Japanese aesthetic sweeping Paris around 1876, at the time of the work’s creation. Instead of sparking a dialogue around the problematic Orientalism of the time, it seems the MFA engaged in a little fetishism of its own. 

In an extensive tumblr post from “Stand Against Yellow Face,” protestors elaborated on the many supremacist aspects of the work’s presentation. “What is the value of inviting the public to then dress up and participate in the very thing Monet was critiquing? Why not choose a print from the Hokusai exhibit to highlight the experience of Japanese women? Or why not provide a discussion on the historical context and criticality about the 1870’s obsession?”

Protestors who gathered in person held signs reading messages such as: “It’s not racist if you look cute & exotic in it besides the MFA supports this!”

There is no education on the garment’s origin, history, uses, or importance in Japanese society at the time,” Stand Against Yellow Face explained on Facebook. “The act of non-Japanese museum staff throwing these kimonos on visitors as a ‘costume’ event is an insult not only to our identities, experiences, and histories as Asian-Americans in America, but affects how society as a whole continues to typecast and deny our voices today … A willingness to engage thoughtfully with museum employees and visitors on the bullshit of this white supremacist ‘costume’ event are [sic] welcome.”

Stand Against Yellow Face’s tumblr memorandum also elaborates on why the choice to exhibit traditional Japanese dress in this way, even if not meant to be offensive, is damaging and hurtful. “Orientalism exoticizes (read: others, demeans and obscures) many cultures including South Asian, East Asian and Middle Eastern traditions, and resulting aggressive attitudes (both micro and macro) towards Orientalized peoples persist to this day.”

On July 7, the MFA released a statement announcing a shift in programming, where visitors will be allowed to touch with and interact with the historically accurate kimonos on display, but not try them on. 

As Katie Getchell, deputy director of the museum, told the Observer, the MFA thought “Kimono Wednesdays” would be a success in part due to the popularity of similar programs in Japanese museums including the Setagaya in Tokyo, The Kyoto Municipal Museum, and The Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, when “La Japonaise” was on loan.

In its July 7 statement, the museum apologized for offending any visitors. Despite this, protestor Aparna “Pampi” Das told the BBC that despite the MFA’s statement, protests will continue until the museum issues a formal apology and opens a panel including protestors to discuss the incident in public.

The MFA wrote in an email to the Huffington Post that the museum is not making any statements in relation to the protestor’s new demands.

See more Twitter reactions to the controversy as well as the full list of FAQs from Standing Against Yellow-Face below and let us know your thoughts in the comments.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Arts – The Huffington Post
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Museum’s ‘Kimono Wednesdays’ Cancelled After Claims Of Racism

“Kimono Wednesdays” sounds more like an ill-advised sorority ritual than sanctioned museum programming. And yet, this month, at the MFA Boston, museumgoers lined up to touch and try on kimonos in front of Claude Monet’s “La Japonaise.”

It wasn’t long before protestors spoke out both on social media and on the museum grounds, dubbing the initiative to be culturally insensitive and racist. Critics pointed out that, even worse, the garments on display were actually uchikake, not kimonos. Insert forehead slap.

As a result of the outrage, the MFA swiftly canceled “Kimono Wednesdays,” which was scheduled to continue until July 29.

Originally imagined to accompany Monet’s “La Japonaise,” a painting of the artist’s wife Camille Doncieux posing with a fan and kimono, the program encouraged visitors to ”channel your inner Camille Monet” by posing in similar garb. 

What’s strange is that Monet’s piece is often interpreted as a satirical response to the absurd, fetishistic craze of the Japanese aesthetic sweeping Paris around 1876, at the time of the work’s creation. Instead of sparking a dialogue around the problematic Orientalism of the time, it seems the MFA engaged in a little fetishism of its own. 

In an extensive tumblr post from “Stand Against Yellow Face,” protestors elaborated on the many supremacist aspects of the work’s presentation. “What is the value of inviting the public to then dress up and participate in the very thing Monet was critiquing? Why not choose a print from the Hokusai exhibit to highlight the experience of Japanese women? Or why not provide a discussion on the historical context and criticality about the 1870’s obsession?”

Protestors who gathered in person held signs reading messages such as: “It’s not racist if you look cute & exotic in it besides the MFA supports this!”

There is no education on the garment’s origin, history, uses, or importance in Japanese society at the time,” Stand Against Yellow Face explained on Facebook. “The act of non-Japanese museum staff throwing these kimonos on visitors as a ‘costume’ event is an insult not only to our identities, experiences, and histories as Asian-Americans in America, but affects how society as a whole continues to typecast and deny our voices today … A willingness to engage thoughtfully with museum employees and visitors on the bullshit of this white supremacist ‘costume’ event are [sic] welcome.”

Stand Against Yellow Face’s tumblr memorandum also elaborates on why the choice to exhibit traditional Japanese dress in this way, even if not meant to be offensive, is damaging and hurtful. “Orientalism exoticizes (read: others, demeans and obscures) many cultures including South Asian, East Asian and Middle Eastern traditions, and resulting aggressive attitudes (both micro and macro) towards Orientalized peoples persist to this day.”

On July 7, the MFA released a statement announcing a shift in programming, where visitors will be allowed to touch with and interact with the historically accurate kimonos on display, but not try them on. 

As Katie Getchell, deputy director of the museum, told the Observer, the MFA thought “Kimono Wednesdays” would be a success in part due to the popularity of similar programs in Japanese museums including the Setagaya in Tokyo, The Kyoto Municipal Museum, and The Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, when “La Japonaise” was on loan.

In its July 7 statement, the museum apologized for offending any visitors. Despite this, protestor Aparna “Pampi” Das told the BBC that despite the MFA’s statement, protests will continue until the museum issues a formal apology and opens a panel including protestors to discuss the incident in public.

The MFA wrote in an email to the Huffington Post that the museum is not making any statements in relation to the protestor’s new demands.

See more Twitter reactions to the controversy as well as the full list of FAQs from Standing Against Yellow-Face below and let us know your thoughts in the comments.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Style – The Huffington Post
FASHION NEWS UPDATE-Visit Shoe Deals Online today for the hottest deals online for shoes!

Why I Collect Racism

2014-09-27-Yellow_peril_300dpi_CMYK.jpg

Image courtesy of Verso Books

I have started to collect racist ephemera — specifically directed toward Asian immigrants and their American descendants. I mean artifacts in paper such as pamphlets suggesting that Asiatic hordes would invade and take over, posters promoting the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Japanese American internment, documents containing ethnic slurs (“chink,” “jap,” “gook,” “Chinaman,” “nip,” “slant-eye” and so on), and advertising featuring caricatured images. I would like to frame this propaganda and hang it. Since almost all Asian Americans whom I know, among others, have objected to this endeavor, I would like to explain the point of the project.

My purpose is to provoke. I would like to disrupt our shared comfort. The greater the upset caused by references to the past, the more intense the urge toward action for the future. Memorabilia should be saved for many reasons, and not all of it needs to inspire nostalgia for the past.

My idea comes from a story I read some time back about African Americans who have a similar hobby. It turns out there exist a few, not many but not none, African Americans who search out articles such as lawn jockeys and then display them. (Although the genealogy of the lawn jockey is disputed, the bulk of contemporary opinion deems this piece of Americana to be derogatory toward blacks.)

A colleague of mine who is Caucasian and a librarian (thus in the profession of accumulating objects) said to me she thought a person with this type of mania would appear to be very angry. My sense is just the opposite: just as people who buy a book feel they have acquired its content even if they have not in fact read the pages, a person who possesses racist art gains control over it. The idol loses its power.

As an amateur student of history, as we all are at least as to our own lives, I would like prove the past was what it was. Many people, including Asian Americans themselves, deny that Asians in American, whether new arrivals or native born, now face or for that matter have ever faced significant discrimination rooted in bigotry. They suppose “politically correct” complaints refer to only the expected adjustment that all newcomers have had to make, learning different cultural patterns, nothing more. Asian Americans are too proud to acknowledge once having been victims before becoming successful.

Hardly anybody recalls, for example, the glib xenophobia of Ogden Nash, the best-selling author of light verse (only his accompaniment to Saint-Saens’s Carnival of Animals orchestral suite is recited nowadays), or Dr. Seuss, the perennial favorite among children’s authors, of The Cat in the Hat and Green Eggs and Ham. They have been whitewashed. Nash described “the Japanese” as “how courteous” as he “grins and bows a friendly bow; so sorry, this is my garden now.” Seuss supposedly wrote Horton Hears a Who as an apology of sorts for his earlier anti-Japanese graphics (not archived within Seussville).

The few items I have purchased — a union membership booklet with rules prohibiting the patronage of Chinese or Japanese businesses, with signed cards for attendance at meetings, and sheet music with lyrics of mock sing-song broken English — make an argument more effectively than I ever could advance explicitly. Too rare for my means are the perfect specimens extant: political flyers that directly assert California confronts a choice whether to be reserved for white Christians, against a background depicting the horror of heathen Orientals. The talismans of racism constitute convincing proof.

The hatred of Asians was open, overt, hardcore, egregious, and unembarrassed. And it was racial. It was not simply directed at anybody coming to these shores, since some of its advocates themselves also were foreigners. Nor was it about assimilation. The demand that Asians conform to the majority was accompanied by the declaration that it would be impossible for them to do so; they remained untrustworthy, inscrutable.

I wince whenever someone who intends to be progressive declares that she has a problem with a work of art, because she deems it offensive. So much art is (or was in its own era) transgressive. Attraction and repulsion are bound together.

Those of us who care about civil rights harm our cause by implying that social justice is merely etiquette. It reduces the issue from substance to appearance. What is wrong is equated with what is ugly, and vice versa. Universal principles are overwhelmed by subjective opinions.

Our opponents, after all, take advantage of the same rhetoric. The Nazis judged modernism to be degenerate. (My own aesthetics would not surprise anyone: I am impressed by painters such as Chaim Soutine, who produced garish canvasses of beef carcasses hanging in the butcher’s storeroom.)

These perceptions extend beyond tastes. Haters can claim to be offended by interracial couples holding hands. If the test were simply whether an individual has her feelings hurt, and no doubt the observer shocked by love transcending color is genuinely agitated, then their aversion about the effrontery of the act they have witnessed is not subject to refutation. Emotions cannot be denied, because they are by definition beyond reason. If creativity is judged by whether it has avoided giving offense, the racists’ sensibilities deserve equal respect to Susan Sontag’s essays.

There are risks to reappropriation. Irony is easily misinterpreted. A contemporary print I have purchased, by Roger Shimomura, shows two couples in a Pop Art style. In “Mix and Match,” the Caucasian male and Asian female are portrayed as romantic and ideal; the Asian male and Caucasian female are portrayed as disgusting and distressed, respectively.

I am not alone in my enthusiasm. A few years ago, John Kuo Wei Tchen, a professor at New York University, curated an exhibition of this material. Now he, with co-author Dylan Yeats, has published a book entitled Yellow Peril: An Archive of Anti-Asian Fear. They offer details on the exclusive nature of Manifest Destiny. The new world of the nineteenth century drove toward the Pacific but stopped by protecting our side.

Yet our anxieties recur. The concerns about the decline of the West, and the rise of the East, have become acute again. There is another possibility. The differences could cease to be meaningful, as civilizations come together.

The demagogues predicted miscegenation would become the norm. They were right. We could embrace the prospect.
Arts – The Huffington Post
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