Profile: In ‘Small Fry,’ Steve Jobs Comes Across as a Jerk. His Daughter Forgives Him. Should We?

Lisa Brennan-Jobs has written a memoir about her famous father. The details are damning, but she doesn’t want them to be.
NYT > Books

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Steve Aoki to Be Face of Diesel’s New Watch Collection

Steve Aoki has snagged his newest fashion industry partnership.
The electronic dance music producer and DJ will become the watch ambassador for Diesel, serving as the face of the brand’s first transparency watch collection, which is launching today.
Last year, Aoki teamed with Asics to serve as a brand ambassador and footwear designer. This supplemented the Dim Mak fashion and lifestyle label he created more than a decade ago and his partnership in Vision Street Wear.
The deal with Diesel is intended to promote the new blue transparency watch line, the inspiration for which was drawn from the indigo dyeing of jeans, a hallmark of the brand. The new watch collection displays cream details on the dial that are inspired by the stitches used in denim, and cases and straps that fade from blue to crystal clear.
Andrea Rosso, creative director of licenses for Diesel and son of founder Renzo Rosso, said he’s known Aoki for a while and believes he and Diesel “have something in common. He never stops, he’s a manic guy; I’ve never met a guy who can do so much. And at Diesel, we never stop either. His style and his sense of aesthetic perfectly match the design and the clashing

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Helen Glover and Steve Backshall reveal baby name

Olympic gold medallist Helen Glover has revealed her baby son’s name, a week after giving birth.
Entertainment News – Latest Celebrity & Showbiz News | Sky News

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Sean Penn Rips Steve Bannon: You Can’t Age Like That Without Hating People

Penn worked with Bannon on his 1991 movie “The Indian Runner.”
Comedy
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Steve Jobs’ error-filled pre-Apple CV on sale

An error-filled job application written by Steve Jobs before he co-founded Apple could fetch more than $ 50,000 (£35,700) at an auction next month.
Tech News – Latest Technology and Gadget News | Sky News

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The lives Steve McNair left behind

After burying her husband nearly a decade ago, Mechelle McNair was determined to keep their sons safe and carry on with the business of living. It wasn’t always easy.
www.espn.com – NFL

Dozens Recount Pattern of Sexual Misconduct by Vegas Mogul Steve Wynn

Wynn Resorts employees and others interviewed by The Wall Street Journal described a CEO who sexualized his workplace and pressured workers to perform sex acts. Steve Wynn responded: “The idea that I ever assaulted any woman is preposterous.”
WSJ.com: US Business

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Reese Witherspoon and Steve Harvey Bring Daughters to Paris Ahead of Famed Debutante Ball

Reese Witherspoon and Steve Harvey brought their respective daughters, Ava Phillippe and Lori Harvey, to Paris this week for a traditional “coming out” prior to officially presenting them in society at Saturday’s 25th annual Bal des Debutantes.

Leading up to the “Le Bal” debutante presentation at the Peninsula Hotel, both families celebrated Thanksgiving in Paris — going shopping, visiting museums and taking in the local sights in the City of Light.

Witherspoon, 41, and Phillippe, 18, once again looked like twins when they were photographed wearing identical matching mother/daughter black outfits while catching a mix of Paris’ haute couture and boutique shopping (with stops at Chanel, A.P.C. and Gucci). Being in Paris, they also made an Eiffel Tower visit (natch).

On Thanksgiving Day, Phillippe accompanied Witherspoon and husband Jim Toth to the Centre Pompidou before taking a walk through the Tuilieries Garden, posting a photo of 5-year old brother Tennessee on a carousel.

On Friday, the mother/daughter duo attended the Bal des Debutantes’ traditional “day before” breakfast and run-through, with the teen trying her designer gown (she’ll wear Giambatttista Valli reportedly) while Lori, 20, practiced wearing a creation from Elie Saab — telling Madame Figaro, her nightmare “was probably falling.”

“My dress is very long, so I did a couple of try-ons this morning just to see that I didn’t get caught in the fabric,” she said.

After a few trials, Lori expressed confidence in her dress and had begun looking forward to Friday evening’s two-hour waltz rehearsal with her brother Wynton, 20, who’ll serve as her escort.

The dance instruction was also attended by Ava and her escort, Padmanabh Singh, the 19-year old Maharajah of Jaipur.

A polo playing acquaintance of Prince William, Singh’s dashing presence at Le Bal has attracted considerable press attention in Paris. Known to friends as “Pacho,” he’s a member of India’s national polo team — who told journalists he’d only asked friends show him the steps for the waltz (the ball’s traditional opening dance) in just the past few weeks. Besides Ava, he has a ready-made dance partner in his sister the Princess Gauravi Kumari of Jaipur, who is also making her debut this season.

RELATED VIDEO: Reese Witherspoon’s Daughter Ava Phillippe to Make Official Entrance into Society at Famed Debutante Ball in Paris

Inspired by the traditional “coming out” parties of centuries past, the annual white-tie and tails event has been held in Paris since 1992. Previous debutantes have included the daughters of Sylvester Stallone, Clint Eastwood and Bruce Willis. Last year’s class included Ella Beatty, the daughter of Annette Bening and Warren Beatty.

Others making their debut this year include British model Stella Tennant’s daughter Cecily Lasnet, 17, (wearing Chanel) and Belgium’s Princess Natasha d’Arenberg, 20, who’ll dress in Belgian designer Frederic Luca Landi. Americans represent a third of this year’s 20 selected debutantes. Among them Lily Webster 17, (wearing Alexis Mabille) of Spartanburg, South Carolina; Charlotte Bell, 17, of New York City and Los Angeles, Jeanne Malle 16, (wearing Viviane Westwood) of New York City, and Laila Blavatnik 18, of London and New York City.


PEOPLE.com

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Steve Coogan wins damages over phone-hacking

Steve Coogan has received a six-figure sum from the publisher of the Daily Mirror over illegal phone-hacking.
Entertainment News – Latest Celebrity & Showbiz News | Sky News

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Trevor Noah Uncovers The Immigration Status Of Steve Bannon’s Ancestors

“So in many ways, Steve Bannon’s great-grandfather was a Dreamer.”
Comedy
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Steve Bannon Reacts to Grim Reaper Portrayal on Saturday Night Live

Saturday Night LiveFormer White House chief strategist Steve Bannon said Sunday he doesn’t care that Saturday Night Live portrays him as the Grim Reaper (opposite Alec Baldwin’s President Donald…

E! Online (US) – TV News

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Stephen Colbert Shares ‘Exclusive Look’ At Steve Bannon’s ’60 Minutes’ Interview

(Spoof) spoiler alert.
Comedy
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‘Yes! We Have No Steve Bannon’ Strikes A Funny Chord In Song Spoof

Randy Rainbow does it again.
Comedy
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Glorious Photos Of ‘Javanka’ That Will Irk Steve Bannon

There are many layers of absurdity here, and only some are made of clothing.
Fashion News, Celebrity Style and Fashion Trends – HuffPost Style
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Twitter Hopes Steve Bannon’s Next Gig Is ‘Dancing With The Stars’

Call it “Dancing with the Czar.”
Comedy
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Steve Aoki Named Co-owner, Brand Collaborator for Vision Street Wear

Authentic Brands Group, which owns Vision Street Wear, has teamed up with Steve Aoki to bolster the line.
The DJ and producer will serve as brand collaborator and co-owner. Aoki said he would be involved in all areas of the business, including overall strategy, marketing and creatively developing each collection.
“This is a whole different world than doing an endorsement deal or a sponsorship deal and just rocking some T-shirts,” said Aoki. “Vision is a beloved brand to me. It’s a brand I grew up wearing and loving through my adolescence and now I am in this position to be a part of maintaining and growing the brand on all different verticals.”
Vision was founded 40 years ago by Brad Dorfman, who started out producing skateboards before introducing Vision Street Wear. Authentic Brands Group acquired Vision Street Wear, which works with partners in Japan and South Korea, in 2014.
Nick Woodhouse, president and chief marketing officer for Authentic Brands Group, believes Aoki, who played at his bachelor party, is the ideal person to build up the brand.
“I always knew what an amazing creative force Steve is,” said Woodhouse. “He produces terrific content, has an amazing social following and people are fanatical about him. He resonates with youth, he’s

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Naomi Campbell, Kate Moss, Steve McQueen among new Vogue team

Naomi Campbell, Kate Moss and Steve McQueen become contributing editors for the magazine.
BBC News – Entertainment & Arts

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Steve Carell Finally Took Ryan Gosling’s ‘Crazy, Stupid, Love’ Advice IRL

Whose mans is this?

Style – Esquire

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Fox News’ Steve Hilton Aims to Examine Populist ‘Revolution’ on Sundays

Steve Hilton is eager to explain the widening gulf between the world’s haves and have-nots. When the former senior advisor to British Prime Minister David Cameron opens his Fox News Channel program this evening, he will so so as the globe is being roiled by headlines that some viewers could never have envisioned decades ago:… Read more »

Variety

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Feeling strong, Warriors heed words of wisdom from Steve Kerr

Feeling strong, Warriors heed words of wisdom from Steve Kerr
www.espn.com – NBA

Steve Madden Slinky Slides Are Coming Back

You probably wore Steve Madden Slinky Slides all throughout high school, and now the early-2000s shoe is back.
Allure
People are getting their hair colored to match Starbucks’s Unicorn Frappuccino
Allure
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Steve From ‘Blue’s Clues’ Made A Song For Kids About Pooping In The Toilet

We just figured out poo’s clues.

Late last year, The Huffington Post caught up with former “Blue’s Clues” host Steve Burns about his and friend Steven Drozd’s kids album, “Foreverywhere.”

Well, now it’s finally out along with a new video for the potty training anthem, “OK Toilet Bowl.”

And … this. Is. The. Poop.

Burns previously told us that after talking with child development specialists, he learned that defecating in the toilet was a big issue for kids.

“This is a song … about courage,” Burns said.

Good thing for kids (and adults), Steve from “Blue’s Clues” is like Ex-Lax for fears.

“I am no longer afraid. I’m proud of the poop that I made,” sings Burns.

Sit back and relax as Steve drops some sweet knowledge while teaching us all how to drop a deuce. 

Like, did you know eating beets can turn your poo red? You can’t beet that. At one point, there’s even a poo haiku involving toilet paper that’ll make you go, “Aw, sheet!”

We’d call this video No. 1. But it’s more like No. 2. (Because, you know … poop.) Either way, the new song teaches us if Blue can poo, we can, too.

Foreverywhere” is out now.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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This Is Not How You Wear a Shirt, Steve Bannon

What the hell are you doing?

Style – Esquire

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Stephen Colbert Delivers Scathing Critique Of Steve Bannon Over Terrorism List

Stephen Colbert had sharp words of criticism for the Trump administration’s claim that major media outlets underreport terrorism as it produced a list of 78 violent attacks. (”No. 5 will shock you.”)

In a segment on Tuesday’s “Late Show,” host Colbert brought up a point that had been repeated by many reporters hours earlier ― many of the attacks had actually generated extensive coverage, like those in San Bernadino, Orlando, Paris and Nice.

The administration’s list was troublesome in one other way, too. It’s “loaded with typos, like ‘attaker’ instead of ‘attacker’ and ‘Denmakr’ instead of ‘Denmark,’” Colbert said. 

“So, at least we know Steve Bannon isn’t a grammar Nazi.”

Ba-boom. (See the clip above.)

Bannon, of course, has come under intense fire for his website Breitbart News, which has been a magnet for white supremacists, misogynists and anti-Muslim audiences. His position as one of President Trump’s top advisers has sparked questions over how much power he actually wields, and what he’ll do with it. Punishing interns who don’t spell-check White House memos is one thing we can cross off the list.

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Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump Wreaks World Havoc With A Skeletal Steve Bannon On ‘SNL’

The moment we’ve been waiting for has arrived: “SNL” finally showed us what life is like inside President Donald Trump’s Oval Office.

On the show’s cold open this week, Baldwin reprised his role as Trump for the first time since the former “Apprentice” host officially took over as the United States commander-in-chief. 

After an aide (played by Kyle Mooney) tells the president that his daughter Ivanka and son-in-law Jared Kushner have gone away for the night since they “don’t work on Shabbat,” the president realizes he’s free to sow chaos. “When the Jews are away, the goys will play. Send in Steve Bannon,” he says.

After Baldwin’s Trump explains to his chief strategist that he is “tired and cranky and I feel like I could just freak out on somebody,” the skeletal, Grim Reaper-esque version of Bannon weighs in with some advice: “Then maybe you should call Australia.”

In a spoof of Trump’s now famously hostile phone call with Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, Baldwin’s Trump melts down on Beck Bennett’s Turnbull, who thanks Trump for accepting 1,200 refugees from Down Under.

“No, no, no! No refugees. America first. Australia sucks. Your reef is failing. Prepare to go to war!” blares Trump before abruptly ending the phone call.

Trump’s foreign outreach doesn’t end there. The parodied president goes on to badger Alex Moffat’s incarnation of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, and even manages to make Holocaust Remembrance Day all about him in a call with Kate McKinnon’s German Chancellor Angela Merkel. “As you know, 6 million people … were at my inauguration,” Trump crudely claims.

Later, Baldwin’s character calls Mexico’s president again (this time, in a prank call) and meets his match when Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe (played by Kenan Thompson) gives Trump a firm dressing-down: “You think you are bit of dictator? I will rip out your spine and drink from your skull! You can not even walk down stairs, you little white bitch!”

The sketch closes with a behind-the-scenes look at Trump and Bannon’s unusual seating arrangement.

Watch the full video above.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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Steve Buscemi Brings A ‘Big Lebowski’ Moment To Women’s March

Steve Buscemi thinks this aggression will not stand, man.

On Saturday, a day after the inauguration of President Donald Trump, hundreds of thousands of people turned up in Washington, D.C. in support of The 2017 Women’s March, a political rally for women’s rights and in protest of the newly inaugurated president.

Many celebrities and activists gave speeches, and estimates say there were more than 2 million participants worldwide. Through it all, “Big Lebowski” actor Steve Buscemi somehow found this guy:

Out of all the craziness, the 59-year-old actor came across a guy—no, a Dude— with a sign echoing some of the most famous “Big Lebowski” lines.

“Shut the fuck up Donny you’re out of your element,” it read. 

In the Coen brothers’ classic, John Goodman’s character Walter Shoback famously says the lines to Buscemi’s character, Donny. Here, the sign is clearly directed at President Donny Trump, but in both cases, it really just ties the room together.

The Dude abides.

H/T Vulture, AV Club 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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Attention The Office Fans: Please Tell Your Friends What B.J. Novak Said About Steve Carell’s Revival Tweet

The Office, Rainn Wilson, Steve Carell Will & Grace is coming back to NBC, and despite Steve Carell’s tweet, just Will & Grace, not The Office. Right after NBC announced the return of Will & Grace, Carell, who played…

E! Online (US) – TV News

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Steve Smith Sr. confirms he’ll retire (Yahoo Sports)

Steve Smith

Smith said that Sunday was his final NFL game, and the league won’t be the same without him.



Yahoo Sports – Top News

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Steve Madden – Jaax – Black Leather Combat Boot

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‘Jaax’ is part of the warming trend! A faux, heathered sock thaws the otherwise cold style of a traditional combat boot. Pair these Steve Madden boots with a turtleneck, leather mini and oversized, flannel, wrap shirt for sizzling runway style! Leather upper Lace up design with gun metal-tone hardware and decorative inside zipper Faux, heathered wool sock trim for effect 1″ heel height 8″ shaft height ‘Jaax’ runs large so we recommend ordering a half size down Imported
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Steve Madden Women s Bcharlee Crossbody Handbag, 7H x 3W x 4.5D in

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Steve Aoki Launches Dim Mak Collection In the U.S.

Steve Aoki, DJ and owner of Dim Mak records, is bringing his high-end men’s line, also named Dim Mak (which means “the touch of death” in Chinese) to the U.S.
Aoki produced and sold T-shirts and hoodies under the Dim Mak label from 2006 to 2011 but always wanted to create a luxury lifestyle collection. In 2014 he had the opportunity to do that by partnering with Parco, a Japanese mall operator, to produce and distribute the line.
Aoki said that because of the collection’s success in Japan — it had high sell-through rates at retailers including Opening Ceremony and Youth by United Arrows — he believes it’s time to make the brand available in the U.S.
“I’ve been involved in building different lines for a long time and know how difficult it is to do it in America,” said Aoki. “I’m just glad we had the wherewithal to start in Japan, see what was working and what wasn’t working and take the line out here.”
According to Aoki, the assortment has an American edge with Japanese pride. It’s made and designed in Japan and features streetwear basics created with Japanese textiles, interesting graphics and updated silhouettes. The line ranges from around $ 87 for a

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Trump’s Chief Strategist Steve Bannon Is Making Millions Off ‘Seinfeld’

As if Donald Trump’s upset presidential victory wasn’t a bitter enough pill to swallow, he’s also officially tainted America’s favorite sitcom “Seinfeld” by appointing Steve Bannon — executive chairman of Breitbart News, a site that traffics in white nationalism — as his new White House chief strategist

Bannon has had his hands in many different business ventures over the years, but one of his most lucrative deals was helping broker an agreement between the company that produced “Seinfeld,” Rob Reiner’s Castle Rock Entertainment, and Ted Turner. 

In order to compete with rival film studios, Reiner and company made a deal with Westinghouse Electric in 1989 for around $ 48 million in exchange for 15 percent of the company. Years later, when Castle Rock was sold to Turner, Westinghouse hired Bannon’s company, Bannon & Co., to advise on how to proceed with their share of Castle Rock. 

“Part of the deal was that Westinghouse could either sell or hold on to whatever TV series we had,” Reiner told The Daily Beast in a recent interview. “At the time we had eight pilots, and one of them was ‘Seinfeld.’ We didn’t know if it was going to be successful or not. But as payment, Bannon advised them to stay in and hold on to their profit participation in the series, and Westinghouse said, ‘Well, if you think it’s so good, why don’t you take a piece of this instead of us giving you a fee?’ And apparently that’s what Bannon did, and he wound up with a small piece of Seinfeld that he’s had forever.”

 

At the time of the deal, “Seinfeld” was only in its relatively low-rated third season, so no one expected the sitcom to become the cultural phenomenon we know today. But when the series was sold into syndication and nabbed the top spot in the Nielsen ratings, all involved, including Bannon, struck gold. 

As The Wrap notes, if Bannon owned even 1 percent of the estimated 3.1 billion “Seinfeld” accrues in reruns, according to The Financial Times, then Bannon & Co. has probably earned around $ 31 million since the series was cancelled in 1998. 

Bannon has reportedly since used these royalties to fund a bevy of endeavors like films such as “Fire from the Heartland: The Awakening of the Conservative Woman” and the ironically titled Sarah Palin documentary, “The Undefeated,” as well as Clinton Cash, a book indicting the Clinton Foundation for corrupt practices.

“It’s crazy,” Reiner said. “When I first heard about it, it made me sick. It makes me sick. Because I had no idea. I didn’t know who he was, or that he was representing Westinghouse. So there you have it. I think The Huffington Post had the headline right: ‘Trump Hires a White Supremacist.’”

To hear more from Reiner, head over to The Daily Beast

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Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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Steve Carell and Rainn Wilson Brawl

E!'s Kristin Dos Santos makes a visit to "The Office" set. Why doesn't Steve have his own bobblehead?
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Steve Madden Women s Fashion Shoes Gammblee Studded Heels, 8

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Steve Madden Women s Bstolen Large Tote Shoulder Handbag, 13H x 15W x 4.5D in

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What's trending in the NFL: Steelers victorious despite major clock error; Pete Carroll contacts Steve Sarkisian

What's trending in the NFL: Steelers victorious despite major clock error; Pete Carroll contacts Steve Sarkisian
ESPN.com – NFL

Apple Co-Founder’s Allies Take Aim At Hollywood Over ‘Steve Jobs’

Four years after Steve Jobs’s death, a new movie is reopening a debate over the Apple Inc. co-founder’s legacy.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




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‘Family Feud’ Was Out Of Control In Steve Harvey’s ‘Tonight Show’ Return

Steve Harvey has encountered some wild contestants on “Family Feud” before, but on Friday’s “Tonight Show,” the craziness values were tripled. 

Harvey returned to the show to play another round of “Feud” with Jimmy Fallon and The Roots, and things got out of hand fast. From the start it was clear that none of the contestants had any idea what they were doing. Fallon was answering like he was on “Jeopardy,” no one knew when to huddle up and The Roots even cheated.

This just proves that when it comes to amazing “Tonight Show” segments, Steve Harvey hosting “Family Feud” is always the No. 1 answer.

“The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” airs weeknights at 11:35 p.m. EST on NBC.

 

Also on HuffPost:

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Comedy – The Huffington Post
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‘Family Feud’ Was Out Of Control In Steve Harvey’s ‘Tonight Show’ Return

Steve Harvey has encountered some wild contestants on “Family Feud” before, but on Friday’s “Tonight Show,” the craziness values were tripled. 

Harvey returned to the show to play another round of “Feud” with Jimmy Fallon and The Roots, and things got out of hand fast. From the start it was clear that none of the contestants had any idea what they were doing. Fallon was answering like he was on “Jeopardy,” no one knew when to huddle up and The Roots even cheated.

This just proves that when it comes to amazing “Tonight Show” segments, Steve Harvey hosting “Family Feud” is always the No. 1 answer.

“The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” airs weeknights at 11:35 p.m. EST on NBC.

 

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Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs Opens Friday, Oct 9, 2015

Set backstage at three iconic product launches and ending in 1998 with the unveiling of the iMac.

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GM of the year finalists: Ducks’ Bob Murray, Rangers’ Glen Sather, Lightning’s Steve Yzerman

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Dying to Do Letterman: My Conversation With Steve Mazan

In comedy, timing is everything, especially if you’ve been given only five years to live and you’ve made it your career goal to perform on “The Late Show with David Letterman.”

The occasion of Letterman’s final broadcast is an opportune time to recount one of the most triumphant moments during Dave’s 33-year tenure, the “Late Show” debut of comedian Steve Mazan, who beat the professional (not to mention the health) odds to make come true his dream of performing on his hero’s stage.

Mazan’s five-year odyssey is chronicled in the documentary, “Dying to Do Letterman,” which was also the name of his social media and grassroots campaign to bring himself to the attention of Letterman’s staff. It is available for free on Hulu.

The 45 year-old comedian, spoke with me about life, Letterman, and not letting “someday” pass you by.

Mazan, a native of the west suburban Chicago city of Hanover Park, was 12 years-old when the original “Late Night with David Letterman” debuted on NBC following “The Tonight Show” starring Johnny Carson. For three decades, the allotted six-minute slot on “The Tonight Show” was the one most desired and sought-after by comedians.

But Mazan felt more of a kinship with Letterman. “He was so different,” he said. “He had a younger sensibility (than Carson). My parents hated him, and I think that made me like him even more. Any time I could, I stayed up late to watch him, and I continued all through college and in my time in the Navy. He was the guy who inspired me to get into comedy (professionally).”

Mazan began performing stand-up in 1999 in San Francisco. His early years were not about getting on “The Late Show.” They were about getting good. Mazan’s Midwestern work ethic told him that a Letterman appearance would surely follow,

“Work hard and good things will happen,” he said. “That has always worked well for me. I just assumed that if I went out there and kept my nose to the grindstone, the Letterman people would hear about me and invite me to audition.”

Every artist is a work in progress. “Dying to Do Letterman” captures Mazan’s maturation as a performer, but also, hilariously, some of the hellish early gigs he did, such as between-inning sets during a minor league baseball game. “That was a promotional tie-in with a local comedy club,” Mazan laughed. “The team thought it would be fun to try a comedy night. I’ve always been up for anything, but it was awful. The players were heckling me.”

During these years, Mazan put his Letterman dream on the back burner as he worked to establish himself. That changed in 2005 following a set at the famed Improv comedy club. Driving home, Mazan experienced sharp pains in his side. By the time he got home, he could barely stand. His initial thought was, least case scenario, food poisoning, and worst case, appendicitis. Doctors delivered the devastating punchline: He had tumors all over his liver. There was no treatment or cure. They gave him five years to live.

Mazan always believed that he would get on “The Late Show” someday. Suddenly, his somedays were limited. “I now had to make someday happen and chase the dream rather than wait for it to come to me,” he said.

While this sounds like something out of “King of Comedy,” Mazan was not tempted to pull a Rupert Pupkin and kidnap Letterman. Instead, he sought out comedians who had done Letterman for advice, including Ray Romano, Kevin Nealon and Jim Gaffigan, who, in the documentary, tells Mazan, that there would come a time when he thought he’d be ready to be on ‘The Late Show,’ but it’s not up to him. “When I thought I was ready,” Gaffigan says, “it was still five years until they said I was ready.”
Mazan might not have had five years. “It’ll never happen,” Nealon jokes(?) to the cameramen following Mazan’s visit.

But it did. Here is the appearance:

Mazan’s time with Letterman himself was short and sweet, he said. “After I told my last joke and he went to break, he said, ‘Great job, really funny’ and shook my hand. I asked for one of the cue cards (of my act) and he handed it to me.”

Mazan is gratified that his “Late Show” routine is cancer-free. In his regular act, he said, material about his condition might comprise five minutes at the end of an hour-long set. “I never want the audience to feel sorry for me,” he said. “I would be wondering if they were laughing because they thought I was funny or because they felt bad for me.”

The “Late Show” staff vetted him as they would any comedian, Mazan said proudly. The documentary captures the setbacks along the way, such as an early assessment that he was not “Late Show”-good.

“It was hard to get that,” Mazan said, “but at the same time, it reinvigorated me to prove to them that this wasn’t a ‘Make-a-Wish’ thing, that I’m a good enough comic to be on their show.”

Mazan reports that he currently feels great. It has been a decade since he first got the original five-year diagnosis. “The bad news is that there is no treatment or cure,” he said. “The good news is that because of that, I don’t have ongoing radiation or chemo, and the tumors have remained relatively small. I’ve been very lucky and feel as good as I ever have.”

Nor has he rested on his “Late Show” laurel. He has written a book version of “Dying to Do Letterman” for the “Chicken Soup for the Soul” publishers. He was a writer on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show.”

But after appearing on “The Late Show,” and with Letterman retiring, what is his next big goal? How do you avoid a letdown? Being a part of the documentary, which has won awards at film festivals, he said, helped him avoid feeling a letdown, he said. “You do want to fill that void so you feel like you’re chasing something bigger. I would love to do “Conan,” (a kindred Letterman spirit). There’s always another level you want to get to career-wise, a new door to break down, a new club to get into. There is always something.”

A version of this story originally appeared on Millionaire Corner.com

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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The World Made Straight Official Trailer 1 (2015) – Steve Earle, Haley Joel Osment HD

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The World Made Straight Official Trailer 1 (2014) – Steve Earle, Haley Joel Osment HD

In a rural Appalachian community haunted by the legacy of a Civil War massacre, a rebellious young man struggles to escape the violence that would bind him to the past.

“The World Made Straight” “The World Made Straight movie” “The World Made Straight trailer” “steve earle” “haley joel osment” “Minka Kelly” “Jeremy Irvine” “Noah Wyle” “Adelaide Clemens” ‘Marcus Hester” “civil war” “appalachian” violence massacre jslewis
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Podcast Review: Chewin’ It with Kevin & Steve

Do you ever find yourself thinking “I wonder what those Broken Lizard guys with the funny movies like Super Troopers and Beerfest are doing?”

Ponder no longer.

2014-10-19-kevsteve.jpgBecause at least two of them are podcasting (and have been for the past couple of years.) Kevin Heffernan and Steve Lemme pop up weekly on the Nerdist network with their show Chewin’ It with Kevin and Steve. These guys will take any subject and run with it, as witnessed in this week’s show when Lemme recounts having to take his infant son to the E.R. the night before. Heart-wrenching as it must have been at the time (the junior Lemme is doing fine), Heffernan assures his podcast partner that he and his future teenaged son will be laughing over the hospital hijinks in years to come.

The two then begin recalling the many and varied reasons for them each having had to visit hospital emergency rooms throughout their lives: A failed leap from a nightspot’s bar. A severed Achilles tendon from kicking through a frat house glass door. A crime-does-not-pay-story involving stolen porn and a nasty spill on a sewer grate.

Clearly, when these guys aren’t making movies, they’re getting into way too much trouble. And then sharing those exploits with us, so that makes it all right.

Also listening to: Plumbing The Death Star: Why Does Superman Find Lois Lane Attractive?; The Carson Podcast: Ed Ames.

This review originally posted as part of This Week In Comedy Podcasts on Splitsider.com. Marc Hershon is host and executive producer of Succotash, the Comedy Podcast Podcast.
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Steve Harvey On Overcoming The Odds: ‘I’ve Lived In A Car. I’ve Been Homeless.’ (VIDEO)

Most people know comedian Steve Harvey as a talk show host, radio personality, and entertainer. What you may not know is that he was once a college dropout who drifted from one dead-end job to the next, even living out of his car for a time. He knows what it’s like to be down and out.

Now, at age 57, Harvey wants to share the lessons he’s learned the hard way. In the above clip from his upcoming appearance on “Oprah’s Lifeclass,” he sits down with Oprah to discuss his new book, Act Like a Success, Think Like a Success: Discovering Your Gift and the Way to Life’s Riches.

Harvey jokes that he writes “very simple.” “You say a word to me that has more than three syllables in it; you have wasted a lot of time. Get your thesaurus out and find a lesser word.”

He explains that he wanted everyone to understand his book because he’s been at “every level there is.”

“I have flunked out of college,” Harvey says. “I have been divorced, messed up my life. I’ve lived in a car. I’ve been homeless. I’ve been written off, told I wasn’t going to be nothing. “

Harvey admits he’s made a “complete mess of my life” in the past.

“So I know what it is to have no money,” he says. “I know what it is to start at the bottom. I know what it is to get back up. I know what it is to overcome. I know what it is to win. I know what losses feel like. I know what failure does — I know how to use it to your advantage.”

“And you know how to reinvent yourself,” Oprah adds.

“Man, you can’t be afraid of that,” Harvey says.

Harvey’s appearance on “Oprah’s Lifeclass” airs Sunday, September 7 at 9 p.m. ET on OWN.

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Daytime Emmy Awards Honor Steve Harvey, Ellen DeGeneres And ‘The Young And The Restless’

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Ellen DeGeneres, Steve Harvey and the soap opera “The Young and the Restless” were among the 41st annual Daytime Emmy winners.

“The Ellen DeGeneres Show” received its eighth trophy as outstanding entertainment talk show at the awards ceremony Sunday in Beverly Hills. The “Steve Harvey” show was honored as outstanding informative talk show, while Harvey won as best game show host for “Family Feud.”

CBS’ “The Young and the Restless” captured six awards, including honors for best drama series and best lead actor for star Billy Miller. Eileen Davidson of NBC’s “Days of Our Lives” was named best drama series actress.

ABC’s “Good Morning America” won the best morning program Emmy.

The Daytime Emmys introduced new awards for Spanish-language shows. Trophies went to Telemundo’s “Un Nuevo Dia” as best morning program, to CNNE’s “Clix” as best entertainment show and to Rodner Figueroa of Univision’s “El Gordo y la Flaca” as best daytime talent in Spanish.

CBS, which received eight creative arts Daytime Emmys for technical achievements at a ceremony last week, emerged as the network leader with a total of 14 awards after Sunday’s ceremony.

PBS received a combined 13 awards, with six for HUB Network; five for TOLN.com; four for ABC and three for NBC.

The ceremony, which aired on the cable news channel HLN last year and in 2012 after losing its longtime home on the broadcast networks, this year settled for streaming the proceedings online. The change in fortune reflects the dwindling daytime audience and programming shifts.

Kathy Griffin hosted Sunday’s ceremony, with Billy Bush and Mario Lopez among the presenters.

Other winners were:

Talk show host (tie): Mehmet Oz, “Dr. Oz Show,” Katie Couric, “Katie.”

Entertainment news program (tie): “Entertainment Tonight,” ”Extra.”

New approaches drama series: “Venice the Series.”

Supporting actress in a drama series: Amelia Heinle, “The Young and the Restless.”

Supporting actor in a drama series: Eric Martsolf, “Days of Our Lives.”

Game show: “Jeopardy!”

Legal or courtroom program: “The People’s Court.”

Culinary program: “The Mind of a Chef.”

Culinary host: Bobby Flay, “Bobby Flay’s Barbecue Addiction.”

Special class special: “The Young and the Restless: Jeanne Cooper Tribute.”

Younger actor in a drama series: Chandler Massey, “Days of Our Lives.”

Younger actress in a drama series: Hunter King, “The Young and the Restless.”

Drama series directing team: “One Life to Live.”

Drama series writing team: “The Young and the Restless.”
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Shine On, Best and Sketches In Spain: Conversations with Sarah McLachlan, John Waite and Steve Wynn

2014-06-04-SarahMcLaughlinout.jpg

A Conversation with Sarah McLachlan

Mike Ragogna: Sarah, how did you approach coming into Shine On versus your other albums?

Sarah McLachlan: I approach all my records the same way, which is to try not to “eat the whole whale at once.” The approach to songwriting for me is slow and laborious and I just have to let things take their natural course. I attempt to work every day, I try to write, but certainly when absolutely nothing is happening and I’m banging my head up against a wall, I kind of have to let it go. But when I am feeling fruitful and things are happening, I just let the song dictate how it wants to go, and I try not to edit myself too much.

MR: Were there any particular scenarios or adventures you had that led into some of the topics that popped on this album?

SM: It was just sort of natural, things I wanted to talk about. I do write from a personal emotional place. I’m typically telling my own story, but within that, there’s always other people’s stories that come into play as well. That’s creative license; you have to tell a story in a unique and special way that’s different from all the other stories, when you only have the words that we have, and only, for example, seven words to stick into a particular frame, and they have to rhyme at the end. Musically I could make the effort to try to do something a little different. With the last record I did some [inaudible at 3:16] and I wanted to do more of that and try to have a bit more of a rawer sound, so that was one of the reasons for wanting to work with Bob Rock, and I think turned out very well. He pushed me in that direction a little more than I would have naturally gone on my own. I think there’s a directness, lyrically. Again, I’ve always written from an emotional point of view, and my stories are always in there, as are others’, but I think that with this time, I felt the story was strong enough on its own not to cloak it with other people’s stories. I’m thinking of “Song For My Father” and “Surrender and Certainty,” which are both sort of about my dad. Those were powerful stories for me that I really wanted to tell, and I just wanted them to be simple.

MR: There’s a piece, “In Your Shoes,” that was inspired by young Pakistani activist Malala [Yousafzai]. What was that process for you, internally, to get to that point?

SM: I had started writing that song months before that happened, and the first line came out in its entirety, “Turn the radio on / play your favorite song and cry,” and I then wondered where that came from, and what I wanted to say about it; it reminded me of when I was a teenager and I disappeared into music because I didn’t have very many friends and I was picked on a lot. So I thought I’d write a song about bullying, which is a hot topic these days – I’ve got two young daughters who luckily haven’t experienced that yet. But I couldn’t finish the song; I tried to think about bullying and I wrote my own story, and it wasn’t strong enough. And then the story of Malala came on the news and she’s so incredible, such a powerhouse. She was at the time 15 years old, and to have that strength of character to stand up for herself and what she believed in, and then to have that horrific thing happen to her and to survive it and become an international heroine… I thought she’s an amazing role model, and the perfect heroine for the story, so the song became easier to finish after that.

MR: What do you feel is at the root of bullying? Is there a basic thing here that we’re just not getting?

SM: I’m really baffled by the whole thing. There are things you can certainly point to that are very different from when I was growing up. When we were growing up and we got bullied, we got thrown into the locker, beaten up, etc. and you just sucked it up and kept on going. No one I know ever killed themselves. But now it seems to me that’s happening all the time, and I don’t understand what has changed. In some ways I would think we have way more support for that kind of thing, but at the same time, with the internet, you’ve got an amazing campaign that can be launched against a kid that’s incredibly destructive. Not just within their own school, but they can change schools and this stuff follows them; it becomes unbearable. That vindictiveness has always been there; kids are cruel. I think the magnitude of it has really gotten a lot bigger, but I don’t know what the answer is. Honestly, I think all of us exist just barely on the right side of chaos at all times. And it kind of amazes me that everything runs as smoothly as it does. You turn on the news every night and there’s kids bringing guns to school and killing themselves and their friends. These horrible things are happening, and I think that as a culture and a society we’re heading away from spirituality and away from communication and connectedness. Most of people’s friends live in the virtual world, they’re not real friends; people don’t have real conversations anymore, they’re living on their devices. It scares the crap out of me.

MR: It seems like what’s happening is that kids are possibly re-expressing what they’re learning in their homes. Maybe there’s something embedded in the psyche of our culture. And you wee bullied, right?

SM: I was bullied every day. I was beaten up, teased, ridiculed. I went to my mom and she told me I was lying because she couldn’t handle it, so I was completely on my own. I didn’t have any friends. But I never even considered hurting myself. Here’s where I go to “Music saved my life,” because it did. It was the one thing I had that I knew I was good at. It was a friend to me. I could always go to music. I’m so lucky because of that.

MR: Beautifully said. Also, I think a lot of people have been lucky because they’ve been able to identify with the topics of your music, and also your recordings; it’s solace. They’ve found a friend in Sarah McLachlan, I think.

SM: That’s what music is for me, it’s comfort. At the best of times it’s comfort, it’s solace, but even more importantly it’s that connection of, “Oh my God, somebody else understands me, someone else hears me and feels what I’m going through because they’re talking about it in this medium and they totally get me.” That’s what we want. We want to be connected, heard, seen. Again, I think that’s part of what’s wrong with our society; you’ve got two parents working nonstop trying to pay all the bills to survive, and kids are struggling. Adults are struggling. Everybody’s struggling. The world is moving so fast, and we’re all trying to so hard to keep up with it. Like I said, one step away from chaos at all times.

MR: I feel like “Sarah Mclachlan” represents something a little bit more than just your typical recording artist who’s had a successful career, evidenced but in everything we just talked about. I think people do find comfort in your music, and that you have contributed much so that you’ve beome iconic in a lot of ways.

SM: I think whenever you’re in the spotlight and are recognizable and a large group of people “follow” you, you have even more of a responsibility. We all have a responsibility to be a positive influence in the world. That’s certainly always been my goal, which is why I’m so incredibly happy and grateful that I’ve been given this gift, and that I can do something good with it. It’s a really amazing validation for me to know that something I created goes out there in the world and helps someone I don’t even know. It’s a beautiful thing.

MR: Sarah, what are some areas where you think artists should be careful or stay aware of?

SM: [laughs] That’s a long list! Surround yourself with people you can trust; though that in itself is a loaded statement, because how do you know who you can trust? I think it’s about managing and understanding people’s agendas, and having good-quality relationships. What is a good-quality relationship? It’s reciprocal. There’s giving and receiving. When and if you can find people in your life who can help you and are in it for the right reasons… it’s such an intimate dance; it’s like reading a parenting book and saying, “Okay, that’s how I’m going to raise my kid.” It’s far too complex for that. Human relationships are so complex, and everyone is unique and different. So to give advice on a particular relationship without having all the facts, you’re never going to have enough information to really accurately give good advice. Even if you do have all the information, the advice is based on your experience, not theirs. It’s a matter of taking people’s advice, not with a grain of salt necessarily, but just getting a lot of different opinions. Don’t just take one person’s answer at face and say that’s the way it is. The bottom line is we have to educate ourselves and be our own advocate. And in order to do so, we need to ask a whole lot of questions and not take everybody’s answer at face value. When you’re your own advocate and you can have a well-rounded understanding for the reasons you’re doing things, you can look at yourself in the mirror at the end of the day and be proud and say, “I did these things, and I did them for the right reasons, and with a certain degree of responsibility.”

MR: Beautiful. Sarah, before we end, did we miss anything?

SM: I’m excited to come on the road for the Shine On tour! Bringing these songs to North America and play them live and we have a great band, and we’re starting rehearsals next week so I’m very excited!

Transcribed by Emily Fotis

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Another Awesome Conversation with John Waite

Mike Ragogna: John, your latest is titled Best–not a “Greatest Hits” per se, but more of an overview of what you felt was your best material on your terms. A lot of the package is made up of live renditions and a couple of re-records. What motivated you to do a project like this?

John Waite: Last December, I was wandering around Beverley Hills and it was raining and it was Christmas, I was doing some Christmas shopping and I got caught in the rain. I walked past a Richard Avedon photography exhibition and I went in, to get out of the rain, really. I’m more of a David Bailey guy when it comes to sixties photography. I worked with David for one of my album covers. I’ve always been interested in art and photography and painting, a lot of different forms of art, so it was great to get out of the rain. I thought, “Avedon, I’ll give it a shot,” you know. It was very high fashion, very sixties, very period, you know, and there’s this one wall that was covered in small framed protraiture, really, everybody from Janis Joplin to Mick Jagger to Elizabeth Taylor to Jean Shrimpton, all sorts of different people. I was stood there looking at it and it just came to me, “What would it sound like if that was music?” If it was a history of my work, what would it sound like? From there on I was making mental notes about how to go about it.

I went back to Britain to see my mum for Christmas and took a sketchbook and filled it full of different lists of songs, every day I would spend five minutes on it and I more or less had the same eighteen songs; I didn’t have anything that didn’t make it on here. But in the mean time I’d been thinking about re-recording “Missing You,” “Back On My Feet Again,” and “Change.” I flew back on New Year’s Eve and almost immediately went into the studio. “Change” I couldn’t do anything with at all, it’s just a period piece that rang the bell really hard in 1981 or whenever, ’82, but it was a complete piece like it was supposed to be and it had a great live version ready to go. But with “Back On My Feet Again” I pulled back all the production and made it as current as I thought I could. I really felt that it would benefit from being stripped down. I’d written the lyric to that song the morning I sang it. It was originally called something else and then the band had cut this track–The Babys–and I hated the track and didn’t want to sing it, so the morning I was supposed to sing it I got out of bed and wrote “Back On My Feet Again” and re-wrote the entire melody and the words and went in and sang it. I only really had, truthfully, about three hours from conceiving it to singing it. Thirty five years later you’ve lived a lot of life, you’ve listened to that song a lot and it was great to get another chance to sing it, and I think I sang it better! With “Missing You” it was the same thing. It had been mixed in a glossy way which was of the time, but the rest of the record wasn’t, it was very hardcore avant garde over the top, a very risky record with no brakes. The single “Missing You” had been mixed with view to it being a single, so it had all the gloss of the eighties on it. It was also the same thing, I’d written the lyric about five days before I sang it, so it was incredibly new as well. I wanted to go back over those two songs and put the thirty years plus or whatever it was that’s happened to me into the songs. I think if I’d have sang it with a hoarse, burnt out voice it would probably sound just as engaging, but I seem to be pretty much in my moment as a singer, I seem to have gotten stronger. It’s got a hint of cowboy in it somewhere. I was thinking about Jimmy Webb–the Wichita Lineman–when I wrote the song, and I was thinking about a Free song called “Catcha A Train,” I was just channeling those two songs really, but there is kind of roots of blues in “Missing You.” Nobody ever really got that. I tried explaining it on a morning show once in New York City. If John Lee Hooker sang “Missing You,” you’d think it was a blues with three more chords. It’s a bit more complex than a blues, but the phrasing and the intensity behind it is blues!

MR: Well, its storyline and sentiment, the topic, is, I think, the blues. To me, it’s all about what’s going on in the lyrics that’s the biggest hint.

JW: Yeah! Absolutely! When I got those two songs, I tried to get “Change,” I had the original guitar player and the original bass player and I just couldn’t sing it the way I’d sung it before, I’d learned too much. a lot of people go back and re-record their masters and I don’t know how they do it because it means singing it like you don’t know what you know today. I got about two bars into it and said, “F**k it.” I gave up the record immediately. The live version is wild, so I’m quite happy with that.

MR: You mentioned the thirty year difference. You know, I used to be a purist, not liking artists re-recording their material. But now I realize now that an artist should be allowed to grow over the years and has every right to look their work and go, “You know what? This really could be a little better here and that could still be a little better there.”

JW: There is a purity, though, when you hear that original sound on the radio, the sound of the drums coming in, you are taken back to a time and there’s enormous nostalgia attached to that. I’m quite a nostalgic person, but as a musician, not as somebody who had written the thing in the first place. It was the need to finish the story somehow. To sing it again at another time in my life. I respect the past and I have quite a strong sense of nostalgia, but after seeing that exhibition and so many people putting out ten songs as “The Greatest Hits” and that’s all you’re going to get, I felt I’ve developed so much more as an artist and I wanted to get that across. If it was the last thing I did, I wanted to have that as my testimony. There’s “Bluebird Cafe” on there and “Sucicide Life,” which are two extremely unlikely songs to put on what you would regard as a greatest hits record, but as a singer and as a writer I don’t think I did anything better. So I wanted to put “Bluebird” on there and I wanted to put “Suicide Life” on there, and that’s where things got sexy, because then it was no longer about songs that had charted or that you knew me for, they were obscurer songs. I just felt like it was the artist’s way. There’s two ways of going, there’s one of making a dollar, and one of just being an artist I guess.

MR: Right, and it’s also the element of revealing more about you than just your hits.

JW: Yeah! I was hoping people would see the roots, because I was raised on western music, Frankie Laine was huge with me; Marty Robbins, they were gods to me; when I was about five, I was wearing a cowboy outfit and running around listening to that. Years later, I got to play the Opry with Alison Krauss and that to me was more meaningful than being number one in the rock world because that was my first inkling of music; country. A lot of things in my life have come full circle, they really have.

MR: Isn’t that funny, how you mentioned it just now? That was more important in your life than having a number one record.

JW: I can’t even begin to tell you how nervous I was backstage. I went out on stage with my band and Alison and it was broadcast. I’d recorded a Vince Gill song about seven years before that called “Whenever You Come Around” and Vince was backstage and as I went out on stage and we went into the top of “Whenever You Come Around” I turned around and Vince was plugging in about fifteen feet behind me, plugging into this old amp he was just trying to get turned on. We played the whole thing live on the air and that was just like Christmas. I can’t imagine a higher moment than with Alison Krauss at the Opry.

MR: It seems you’re digging deeper into the reality of the songs and who John Waite is. It’s really a theme with you, huh?

JW: Yeah! Well, I’ve grown up. I’m not really classic rock, Classic Rock Magazine in England barely write about me. I took a full page ad in the magazine this month because we just got back from Milan, we went ove rand played the Milan Frontiers Rock Festival and we went down like a storm. We just blew the place apart. But I don’t fit into their perception of what a classic rock guy is, and I’m very opinionated and I say what I mean about music and a lot of classic rock is complete crap. It just is. It is, and there’s people who can’t think of anything else to do but repeat the past. I have this weird kind of thing going on where I’m not mainstream, I’m not classic rock, I’m not country and I was saying to Jim Ladd the other day on this Deep Tracks show, me and Jim go back years, “That’s what’s what,” and he said, “Yeah, but you’re a singer-songwriter,” and I thought, “Wow, I guess I am in some strange way.” If you look at “Suicide Life” and you look at “Bluebird” you would consider that singer-songwriter.

MR: I think he’s right. But you’ve always been a singer-songwriter because you’ve had great songs. I guess it’s just the clothes one puts on the musical body, the image, that differs.

JW: I agree, there’s a way of putting on the table. As Steely Dan once said, “You’ve got to learn how to put it on the table,” and I think I came at America with a very good tailor. I really wanted to engage people visually, but I think I was toying with the idea of the whole thing. It was like a game, but behind it all it was deathly serious. I was trying to write a song so that it would last thirty years and apparently I’ve managed to do that. I felt, honestly, making this record, that it needed to be done now because I wanted to get on with something else. I needed to explain myself to people in these songs and then move on. I might even make an acoustic record. I’ve got half of the album and it’s really out there, but it’s very spartan and lyric-driven. I wanted to draw a line in the sand, I wanted to say, “This far and no further.”

MR: Look at Robert Plant, what he did was he presented himself as he saw himself, not just as Led Zeppelin.

JW: He probably did that when he set off. But you do get trapped into a logo. I think I took a left turn after “Missing You,” I made a quiet record, I didn’t go and try and immitate “Missing You.” I’ve always tried to do something that people didn’t expect, but I don’t know what’s going on anymore, I’m not listening to other bands like I used to. I couldn’t tell you who’s number one right now.

MR: It’s pretty difficult! I asked Glenn Hughes how he felt about what’s going on in the music scene and he scratched his head. Now more than ever for you to have a huge, huge hit means record companies are putting a lot, a lot, a lot of money behind you. It almost seemes like they are taking no chances and you have to act exactly like your brother and sister records.

JW: Absolutely, everything’s compartmentalized. But you know, that doesn’t mean that people aren’t making great art. I just got off the phone with somebody who said they expect a hundred thousand new people to arrive in Nashville this year. A hundred thousand people. And I’m worried about what happens to Mister Bluegrass and what happens to Larry Sparks and Del McCoury and Ricky Scaggs and Alison Krauss. I’m worried about those people, the real people.

MR: I often wonder what the motivations are for young people who are going in to music now. Is it to make art? Is it to make music because they don’t know any other way? Or is it for the American Idol illusion?

JW: You beat me to that! I was going to say at the end of that road is American Idol. It’s not the satisfaction of bringing the house down at the Ryman, or writing a song that stops people breathing for a second. I don’t want to come down on what’s going on around me, because there’s still great songwriters out there, it’s just that the whole focus has shifted on to showbusiness, which is great, too, because all the idiots are going to be in one place at one time.

MR: [laughs] What advice do you have for new artists?

JW: I would just go your own way! Steve Marriott once said, and I may have used this as my answer twice now, “The first idea you have is the best one.” There are so many people involved in making a record when you’re at a record label and the money is so tight, they’re so scared of releasing anything that’s cutting edge that everything’s like three minutes and everything’s aimed at a demographic, as they say. That doesn’t mean–when you look back to Tracy Champman doing “Fast Car” somebody, somewhere at a record company saw her and went, “She’s the real deal.” And then they backed it up with a tremendous video because they understood how deeply she felt all of that and how real she was so they so they gave her the video too. There was nobody saying, “Put this dress on and sing about this.” It’s a threatened business. Artists are much, much bigger than the business. People that chase after artists, that’s what they’re meant to do, but the artist is going to be the uncompromising guy on the end like Dylan or somebody who just changes the world with three chords and starts singing something. It’s like that great moment in Llewyn Davis movie where he’s singing that song to the agent, and then he stops playing the guitar and he sings the rest of the song with just his voice and it’s heartbreaking and you think you’ve got this reaction out of F. Murray Abraham and then he says, “I don’t see any money in it.” It’s just a great moment, but that’s the world.

MR: What ever’s going to happen to that level of talent?

JW: It will be okay. It’s always going to be okay. There’s always going to be somebody who takes a step to the left and then everybody follows them. It just takes that one percent. It’s more fun to go your own way anyway. I think once you get on the wheel you’re kind of sunk. I’m very positive about music, I think it’s a beautiful thing and it’s always going to be constant and people are going to want quality. I guess all kids that want to be in the music business, there’s going to be a percentage that are going to be brilliant, but everybody seems to be in it at the moment.

MR: Well, I hope some of those hundred thousand descending upon Nashville are coming from the house of brilliance.

JW: Oh man. Just oh.

MR: We mentioned classic rock earlier. You have one of the great classic rock songs, “Head First.” That became an anthem, maybe because sports arenas played it, it got endless airplay, all that.

JW: Although there was soul stuff and blues stuff, it wasn’t fully The Babys direction, really. Whatever it was, it was come upon honestly. There was no uniform to wear, there was no club to join, back then it was just great rock radio. It was before MTV. You had to fight to play, really, it was like the underground. I thought The Babys were exceptionally great, but I have a hard time calling that classic rock, it’s not like the guys running around giving high fives on stage and wearing spandex still. I don’t understand any of that, I don’t. Speaking of Glenn Hughes before, he’s got a tremendous voice, he’s an incredibly great bass player, a very musical guy and a nice geezer, and I’m sure he’s puzzled as much as I am when he looks to the left and the right of himself and sees how people want to compartmentalize music.

MR: Yeah, his group California Breed doesn’t really fit into one particular thing.

JW: I haven’t heard that yet, but I’ve heard it’s good! He’s always swinging, he’s always comging out of his corner fighting.

MR: Speaking of The Babys before, I recently interviewed Tony Brock recently. They’re releasing a new album as well. John, I’m imagining you have an affection for The Babys and what you did during that period, too.

JW: Oh, absolutely. “Isn’t It Time,” “Head First,” there’s a few Babys songs–we do a live version of “Every Time I Think Of You” on the record. Pretty much The Babys would’ve done it, just a three piece band, maybe some Hammond organ, although we had no organ, but we had a backup singer, Debby Holiday. It’s bluesier. I don’t know if we finished as well as we started, because we were a five piece by the time we finished. I think we might have lost a thread when I stopped playing bass, but my favorite Babys stuff is probably the first three albums.

MR: Yeah, but it’s a nice place in history.

JW: You know, there’s a great beauty in the fact that we didn’t make it completely to the top. There’s something ironic about it, but there’s something ironic I just love about the fact that people are still playing it. We might have just been ahead of our time.

MR: That reminds me of The Move versus… or Free versus… hmm…

JW: Yow!! [laughs]

MR: Maybe that’s a little grandiose, sorry.

JW: No, that was great! God! I wouldn’t have made that comparison. I still listen to Free and just sit there and go, “How did they do that?” It’s three guys and a singer in a room and basically they’re playing live. But they were that good. Bands in the seventies, the bands that really influenced me, that I went to see at the local university on Friday nights, The Who and Quintessence and Family and all the great bands that I saw there, they were three piece bands that had a Hammond organ player on the end. It wasn’t big productions. If I know anything, after Bad English I was so disgusted with myself I went back to being completely a singer-songwriter. Temple Bar was a songwriter album. My life began again at that point.

MR: Bad English seemed like an excursion.

JW: Yeah, I think it was a detour. It had its year and then it was kind of done. We were done. We couldn’t top anything we’d done.

MR: It’s like The Firm, or a couple of other bands that happened around that time.

JW: Yeah. It brought a smile to a lot of people, it was good fun, but it was high time to leave when it was time to leave.

MR: What’s the future for John Waite? What do you want to do?

JW: Well, I think I got very close in ’96 when I did the When You Were Mine album, “Suicide Life” is off that, and that was dark and it was lyrical and it was way out, and “Bluebird Cafe” was on that record, too. I think I’m going back to that. It’s in my nature to keep taking a left turn and taking a right turn and trying to get out of the maze of where I am and find somewhere new, but I think I was on ground there that was really truthful. The songs that I’ve written so far for the new record are pretty extreme, they’re pretty out. That doesn’t mean to say I’m not going to go out and sing hard rock and do “Missing You” and do all theo ther things as well, but I might tour smaller places just for a few months, just coffee houses or something just to get that vibe back of being on the acoustic guitar. Everything about my life comes from the acoustic guitar, and I’m a rock singer and I’m influenced by western music and blues, so I haven’t a clue. And I’m glad I don’t! I take it as it comes. There’s so much more to do and I want to do it while I can still sing full out. My voice is in incredible shape for some reason, and I’m enjoying the hell out of my life and I’m enjoying the new record. Tomorrow’s pretty bright.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

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A Conversation with Steve Wynn

Mike Ragogna: The album Sketches In Spain collects a certain period of your music. What’s your perspective on that album’s material now?

Steve Wynn: Sketches In Spain is a compilation that Omnivore is putting together from two collaborations I made in Spain in the last decade. The first was a record with a band from Spain called Australian Blonde, we did a record called Momento in 2001. The second record is a collaboration called Smack Dab, which is me, my wife and drummer Linda Pitmon and also the leader of Australian Blonde, Paco Loco. That came out in 2005. So that’s the basic facts updated.

MR: So you like to collaborate.

SW: I get off these days more from collaboration than anything else! I like going to new places, new cities, new countries, new studios with people I’ve never worked with before and seeing how they do what they do. I still do my own solo records, I still have my various bands, but that’s the thing that’s always fun, that always gives me that rush. It’s like a first date, it’s like that kind of feel. A blind date, even. The excitement of having to come up with your best stuff quickly before the other person loses interest. This is probably one of the more successful versions that I’ve had, where I was working with virtual strangers in Spain, these guys from Australian Blonde, they were friends of friends, they were a really popular band that had a number one single in the nineties, kind of a grunge-pop-indie band that really did well over there. We got hooked up on one of these musical blind dates and it worked great. We spoke the same language literally and metaphorically, because I do speak Spanish pretty well. We collaborated on this record not by email, but by FedEx, sending tapes back and forth the old fashioned way. It’s funny, it was just fifteen years ago but it was a very different way of working.

MR: Did you end up in Spain for creative reasons?

SW: I do a lot of touring over there, ever since my earliest days with the Dream Syndicate I’ve had a good following there. I tend to get over there at least every other year for shows. The guy who ran my label over there, a label called Astro Discos, had formerly been in Australian Blonde. He knew them really well, he knew me really well and he just felt we’d hit it off. Around that same time I was wroking on a series of song of the month installations for the website eMusic. I was trying to make each month be a new collaboration, a new setup, a new way of working with different people like I was talking about earlier. I suddenly had a whole in my schedule for March of that year and htat’s when I got in touch with this guy, Paco Loco from Australian Blonde and I said, “Let’s try something.” We did a song called “The Last One Standing,” it’s one of the songs that ended up on the record. It’s funny how these things are quick sometimes. It’s just like dating, or like a business transaction, go down to the market and look at the produce, whatever. The day where you hit it, you hit it right, and the days where you don’t it doesn’t work at all. On these collaborations in Spain it was just effortless, which is always exciting.

MR: So Dream Syndicate versus the Steve Wynn solo career… What is the creative difference between the two? How do you approach each of them?

SW: I really do what I do period. I think that’s the best way of putting it. Each time I have a batch of songs or a project I’m working on, whether it’s a solo record or a record for whichever band I’m playing with at the time, it’s generally a collaborative situation. I’m not a tyrant in the studio, I get more excited by feeling what people are bringing to the session and what people I’m working with might be good at and the way they react to what I’m doing. That kind of gets me to respond in the moment. The more preconceived notions I bring into a session the worse it is. It’s probably not a good way to do a lot of things, I’m sure. If you go to an interview and say, “Here’s what this is all going to be about, I’m going to get this thing out of the way as fast as possible” you may not get anything surprising out of it. I don’t know if that’s true for anyone, but I like to be surprised. I like to have my expectations turned upside down. So when I go into a project I kind of get my feelers out to see what people are bringing in to it.

MR: That’s really smart. That’s a good point, and that’s really true. So you’re more of a spontaneous creative person. I’m imagining however that when you have your solo projects, something like Crossing Dragon Bridge, do you get motivated to do them when it’s time to do a new album, or are you motivated because you’re getting hit by the muse and you need the vehicle?

SW: That’s changed over the years. I think say twenty or thirty years ago things were different. Back in the eighties you were expected to have your one project and hit it every couple of years as hard as you could with a new record and tour and you would focus on the idea of “It’s time to do something new,” and that was great, but I think now it’s different. If a situation comes up, I come up with songs for it. So if I know I’m going to Slovenia, for instance, for Crossing Dragon Bridge and I’m going to work with someone like Chris Eckman, who’s a really good producer there and the leader of The Walkabouts–great band–and I know what he does, I come up with songs for the situation and then show up ready to change and adapt once I’m there. I think more and more these days I’m just looking for things I want to do. At any given time, even right now there are about five or six different records that I could make in the next half year, that I want to make in the next half year, and whichever one I choose, that’s kind of going to dictate the bag of songs that I bring to the session.

MR: Wow. Now we’re in 2014, you surely are working on something, is it another album?

SW: Well I just put out a new record with The Baseball Project. It’s kind of the focus for me because it came out a couple months ago and we’re going to tour all summer. That’s one thing I’m doing now, I’m also working on a new solo record, and I really want to do a new Dream Syndicate record, so that’s something I think I might try to do later this year. We haven’t done a record together since 1988. It’s interesting, I think there was a time where I might not have wanted to do another Dream Syndicate record, I would’ve thought there was too much weightt on the record–for me, I’m not saying for the world–but for me, what would it mean, what would be the natural progression of the record, what would be the context?” and the more I think about it, especially since we’ve been playing together and touring lately, it’s just another step along the way, another record, another little postcard from far away.

MR: At this point in your career, where are you energy-wise? You sound like you still like to tour a lot, you still like to record, where are you as far as long range? Do you have a long range plan with this stuff?

SW: Not really. I just like being busy, I like writing songs, I like working with people and I like being on the road. I’ve been doing this now for thirty years, I’ve played a lot of shows, made a lot of records, and the idea of a long range, where I want to be in ten years, I hope that in ten or twenty years I’m doing what I’m doing and doing it better, and that in fifty years I’m alive and in a hundred years I’m preserved somewhere in a museum. Who know? You just can’t make plans at this point, especially given the way music is changing so much and the way people hear music and get music, I think more than ever I just take it day to day and project by project. That’s kind of the way it should be. You’re deluding yourself if you think you know what’s going to happen ten years from now. I was at a baseball game the other night and they were advertising on the Jumbotron a Styx and Foreigner concert at Caeser’s Palace and I was thinking, “I wonder if these guys thought thirty years ago that they’d be playing a casino in Atlantic City together in 2014.” Maybe they wouldn’t maybe it would be a horrific thought, or maybe it would be kind of exciting, but you just don’t know. I think each time you’re in one of those situations you say, “Here’s where I am, how did I get here, how did this happen? Why at this moment am I doing this? I didn’t see this coming, but what can I do with that?”

MR: If you had the opportunity to play in Caeser’s Palace, would you turn it down?

SW: I wouldn’t turn down anything that appealed to me. That’s a very obvious statement, but I just take every situation and say, “Do I want to do this?” It’s a lie when people say they don’t do things to keep doing this, especially now. Again, it’s a big change, you see lots of musicians doing commercials or doing private shows or casino shows or whatever it is and they may not even consider twenty years ago, but you’ve got to do what you do so you can keep making more music and keep surviving. You have to take each one along the way and say, “Is this something I want to do? Is it reprehensible? Is it something that I’m going to regret years from now?” There’s no hard and fast rule. All bets are off now, you do case-by-case what you want to do and what makesa sense. For me, I’ve just always enjoyed being out there and playing. It’s funny, you hear people say a lot these days, “Well now that record sales are down, people have to be on the road all the time,” as if that’s a sacrifice or a hardship. It’s what I love doing. It’s what I’ve loved doing from the start. I love touring, I love playing every night, I love the nightly rebirth you get when you finish a gig and it’s history and you have another one to look forward to the next day. That’s great. Nothign has changed for me. I’m still writing songs, putting them together in some kind of context and going out there and telling people about those songs all around the world.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

SW: I think that the advice is no matter what you hear, what you’ve read, what you think, what people tell you, at the end of the day you’re always right. No matter how crazy your impulse is, no matter how wrong it seems, you’re right. Trust yourself. Do it. You’re going to have to live with it and probably the more people that tell you, “Things don’t work that way,” the more you’re on to something.

MR: Is that how you did it?

SW: In a way. I think that one of the main reasons The Dream Syndicate caught on so quickly is that we were doing something that seemed like the exact opposite of what was going on; we were playing raw, feedback-laden guitar music at a time when everybody wanted to hear synthesizers and wear frilly coats. I think it seemed like the exact wrong thing to do at the time and I think that’s why people liked it. And it wasn’t even calculated like that, it’s a matter of what we wanted to hear. There was a philosophy we had back then that I still hold today: If you’re making music htat would be somebody’s favorite record, even your own favorite record, you’re doing okay. If you’re trying to make music because you think, “A lot of peopel are going to like this, this is what people want to hear these days,” eh, you might make it, you might not, but you’re not going to have a lot of fun. It’s kind of going back to that extreme thing. I think self-indulgent is a good word. I think it’s good to be self-indulgent. It’s good to indulge yourself, when it comes to making music anyway. That’s the idea. Who else are you going to indulge? If you do that, if nothing else you’re going to make one person really happy, and that’s yourself. And maybe, maybe out of millions of people in the world you’re going to make somebody else happy, too.

MR: Yeah, and you’ve made a lot of people happy all over the world, too, because you even have a tribute album! Dude, a double-disc tribute album to Steve Wynn! How do you feel about having something like that in existence?

SW: It’s great. That’s actually one of the most flattering things that’s ever happened to me. Some of them were friends, a lot of them were bands I admired, a lot of them were both, and they did great versions of my songs with a lot of love and a lot of understanding of what the songs are all about. That was fantastic. There’s a lot of things that are great. It’s great when you make a record, when you collaborate with new people and it works, when you play a show and everything clicks, it’s great when you write a song that moves you in some way and connects that with other people, but it’s also reallygreat when other msuciains say that you inspired them somehow. That’s a very real thing, that’s a thing that everybody understands. I understand because there are so many people that I have met that can say, “I heard that record when I was seventeen and it just changed everything that I wanted to do.” It happened this week, I’m doing a show in New York next month, a tribute show to the Nuggets collection, the show is being put together by Lenny Kaye, who put that collection together, he was in the Patti Smith group and he put out the original Nuggets. I said to him, “First of all, I’m really happy you’re asking me to do this, and second I’ve got to tell you, the Nuggets compilation changed my life when I was seventeen. That just re-wrote the rulebook for me.” He’s become a friend over time, but also I have to remind him often what he meant to my life. When I meet a musician in Italy or Norway or Japan or whatever who says, “I heard your record and it made me want to start a band,” that’s great. I get that. I’m happy, I’m flattered, and I completely understand what you’re talking about because I’ve been there, too.

MR: What do you feel The Dream Syndicate’s place is in music history and pop culture?

SW: I think we were a link between all your Velvets and Stooges and Big Star and all of the bands that came after that and became the textbook for indie rock. We sort of passed the baton from the groovy bands of the sixties and seventies to what it all led to. It’s a genre, it’s several channels on Sirius Satellite Radio, it is a corner stone of a certain kind of music. College kids plug a guitar into a fuzzbox and gettin’ loose. I think we were a nice middle point in that line. The thing is, I look at what we did in the eighties and what we meant to people in our inner circle and outside of that, but now that we’re together again I think, “What do I want to be now?” I like the idea that what we are now is kind of a living, breathing, modern band that has that connection at least in name, at least in catalog and probably in intention as well to what we did in the past but is hopefully going somewhere else as well.

MR: When you look at music now–and this isn’t a “Hey, kids, get off my lawn” question…

SW: “Get off my lawn,” that’s a good one. On certain days, I feel like that, too.

MR: [laughs] Do you think there’s something missing from the pop culture-powered education of the last couple crops of creative people?

SW: It’s just different now because there’s a lot more out there. It’s a gigantic tower of Babel with everybody shouting from different rooftops of every kind of music and you start to feel like everything’s been done. There are days where you feel like, “Well, there’s nothing that can surprise me, there’s nothing new, everything is a rehash of something, and then you’ll hear some new record with somebody doing something that has been done a million times but has been done in some unique way with a unique voice and some weird thing about the way a singer might phrase their vowels or some weird thing about the way a guitarist hits their open D chord, and you say “I’ve heard that a million times but I’ve never heard it like that,” and you get excited all over again. It happens to me all the time. You can define something by all the ingredients that went into it, the same way as when you’re cooking something on a stovetop and it comes out better than you’ve ever made it before, you can define it easily, but you can’t define it because it’s a human being that did it and in some way it’s a finger print. In some way it’s never been done before. Again, the advice I give to everybody is just do your best to try to find that thing yourself and then push as hard as you can. Exaggerate your own individuality. Do your own thing. Indulge yourself. All of my stories are baseball game stories, not to hype my other band, but I was at a Boston Red Sox game at Fenway parks a few weeks ago and between innings at one point they played “Roadrunner” by The Modern Lovers. I know they’re pushing that to be the state song of Massachussetts, and it should be, and it blared out of the PA system and it sounded so beautiful and everybody in the park responded to it like it was the biggest hit of all time, like it was the national anthem, and I thought, “This band, The Modern Lovers, made that record for almost no money, almost no attention back in the early seventies.” It’s a record that by the late seventies I had and maybe five thousand other people had in the whole country, and now it’s a standard. I think of all the records that came out in the same time that were huge hits on the charts, big stadium-filling bands that are forgotten by now. Now, having said that, there are a lot of people who would rather cash in, play a stadium, count their money and be done with it. That’s fine. More power to you, but for making lasting music, making something you can do your whole life, like I have, which I think is truly winning the jackpot, if you want that you’ve got to do your own thing, go your own way and not be afraid of what people are going to say of you.

MR: You’ve had your solo career, your bands, your guest appearances… What’s left? What is it that you still want to conquer?

SW: I feel like the Sketches In Spain record is a good indication of the kind of thing I really enjoy doing most these days, finding new people and new combinations. That doesn’t mean I couldn’t sit alone in a room with an acoustic guitar and write songs and sing them that way, that’s exciting, too, but I do like working with new people. I like seeing how things work in other places. In the next year I’m probably going to do a record in Mexico with a band over there, another record in Spain and possibly a record in Italy along with everything else I’m doing. I’m not going to say those things are my favorites, but they are the most surprising, generally. Everything is going at full speed, in the next month I’m playing a show with the Dream Syndicate, one with my band, Steve Wynn & the Miracle Three, one solo show and one with The Baseball Project. They’re all different catalogs of songs and different inside jokes and personalities and all that. I love it that way.

MR: Nice. Do you blend all that stuff when you do a solo show?

SW: Depends on which solo thing I’m doing. It could be me by myself, or me with four other people. Like I said before, the beauty of it is that every night is unique and every combination is unique, which is great. I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne
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A Quick Chat with Steve Miller and Journey’s Neal Schon & Jonathan Cain, Plus Introducing Jamie Eblen

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A Conversation with Steve Miller and Journey’s Neal Schon & Jonathan Cain

Mike Ragogna: Journey and the Steve Miller Band recorded a few of the most popular albums ever made, especially Escape and Greatest Hits 1974-1978. And soon, you’ll be touring together with Tower Of Power. What is it about your bands that resonated with pop culture?

Steve Miller: I think Journey and Tower Of Power and the Steve Miller Band, we’re all part of the core of original groups in the San Francisco music scene. This is a social phenomenon as well as a musical phenomenon. These bands are an integral part of music and art and production of a whole new approach to music. Once you start changing the way people attend concerts, what happens to concerts, then you’re in an unusual creative environment that San Francisco was in for three decades–really, the sixties, the seventies, and the eighties. There’s really just an amazing amount of creativity that came out of there. I think that’s what shaped bands like Journey and us. We made a lot of records. If you look at Journey, “Don’t Stop Believing” and all the albums that they put out in a row–Infinity and then Evolution, Departure, Escape, Frontiers–that was like in five years. I think we put out five albums in the first eighteen months that we started recording. Five albums in eighteen months is pretty amazing. The creativity was fast and the response from the audiences was instant.

At the same time we’re doing this, we were building brand new stages, brand new sound systems, brand new light shows. All that really added, I think, to what made the music mean more than just a string of hits. Tower Of Power is in there too. This is a phenomenal band. When you look at the music that came out of it, it makes sense that it’s become so classic. Journey proves it, Tower Of Power proves it, people are still listening to these songs, they’re still buying these songs and they’re still coming out and they want to hear and see the bands perform. So that’s a different thing from just producing hit music and writing hit singles. There’s a lot more to it than just that music.

Neal Schon: I think the reason Journey is still prominent and out there is because we basically work our asses off and tour every year and continually play the music and have new audiences coming all the time, maintaining younger fans. Also I think we just got it right. We wrote a lot of really great songs, the three of us–myself, Steve Perry, and Jonathan Cain. We just got some things right, and I think that’s why it’s etched in stone.

Jonathan Cain: I’d say the thing is that time period that [we all] had our success, people were hungry for the combination. American music is blues, it’s pop, it’s soul, and it’s the combination that makes it unique. I think all of us have that in common. We grew up loving soul and the blues and great melodies. I think the melodies were contagious, they were in the air, people wanted to be able to sing along with stuff, people wanted to party. We had Bill Graham, one of the greatest promoters of all time. He really invented the rock concert. He was a local guy who brought the Bay area together. We had the Bammies–the Bay Area Music Awards–a brotherhood celebration, if you will, of artists who shared the passion in the Bay area. It was a time and place when the Forty-Niners were close to the town and they would show up with Bill Graham at concerts.

I think we in the seventies and eighties enjoyed some of the greatest moments with our fans because the ticket prices weren’t crazy, they were out there buying our albums–two hundred and fifty thousand a week. It’s unheard of, that amount of participation with our fans, sharing this thing, and we happened to [be on] one of the greatest record companies in the business, Columbia. There were a lot of shiest-y ones that didn’t pay you. But I have to say, Columbia always took care of us. Their army of soldiers helped sell these phenomenal records, well over a hundred million, which is hard to believe. We would not be the brand without all of those wonderful people who helped us in those years.

It took a village to make a hit record, to make brands like Journey and the Steve Miller Band last. We had the good fortune of having all of those people, the distributors, the handlers, the ones that got the records out to the stores before Best Buy and all these other people took over, that was amazing. You go to met these folks; they were grassroots people. We were very blessed to have that kind of backing. I think that contributes to a lot of our success today, while we were still out there doing it. Without the radio people–the DJs, the personalities, the Kid Leos of the world who promoted bands and had you on the radio that wanted to know how you were and had you on an interview; those kind of things where you actually went on a radio station and talked to the city and checked in with those people. “How are you doing?” That was an amazing time, where artists really got a look at the fans they were looking at, taking phone calls on the air, and really, really knowing your audience, looking them in the eye, saying, “Yeah!” Me joining Journey with Steve Perry was a crapshoot. They picked me out of The Babys and little did I know how much Steve and Neal and I would have in common musically. Together, we wrote some pretty cool songs. I’m very proud of that.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

NS: My son is an aspiring guitarist and he’s amazing, I’m always looking for ways to help him out and get him out there–with the demise of record stores and pretty much the whole record industry I tell him, “You’ve got to go out and you have to play and you have to be seen.” It’s very difficult, I realize it is, for young artists to be seen because it’s so backwards. It’s A-S-S-backwards! You have to pay to play a lot of times in these clubs, a lot of Mom & Pop clubs are closing down, so it’s very difficult. But I just say, “Jam with whomever you can, who’s got a decent name and a decent band and be seen as much as you can in a live sense.”

JC: My advice to new artists is to be true to what you believe you’re best at, and not to try to chase the trend. If you’re a hip-hop guy, stay a hip-hop guy. If you’re a rock guy, be the best rock guy you can be. Go with your strengths and try to get your music and your brand out there on the internet. It’s really the best place, with social media and all these sites that you can go on and put your music out there. Just try not to give it away. That’s the one problem…people are giving out their music for free.

MR: Steve, what is your advice for new artists?

SM: My advice for new artists is to forget about all of this and take acting and dancing lessons and become a video star.

MR: [laughs] But what if they’d prefer to play music?

SM: I’ll tell you the truth. When I started playing, the only hope there was, was to work in night clubs. This was before San Francisco. When San Francisco opened up, I left Chicago where I played with Muddy Waters and Howling Wolf and James Cotton and Junior Wells and Buddy Guy and immediately went to San Francisco because it was a chance to play in a ballroom to twelve hundred people instead of a bunch of drunks in a nightclub. It’s sort of like the same world for new artists. It seemed impossible when I was a kid. I never thought that I would be able to make any kind of records and never thought seriously about a musical career because a musical career was being Fabian or Frankie Avalon or something. It didn’t make any sense. There wasn’t any possibility to get into that world.

It’s kind of like that for kids now. I just had an eighteen year-old kid opening for me in Canada a couple weeks ago, Matthew Curry. Wonderful guitar player, great songwriter, in the Stevie Ray Vaughan area of virtuosity and originality. He’s really great. I’m looking at this kid and he’s driving in a van so he can open for us. I brought him up on stage to play with us and I’m sitting there trying to figure out, “How is this kid going to actually make it in this world where it takes five million dollars and a corporate sponsorship from Pepsicola to have a hit record nowadays?” It takes thirty million dollars to sell two million albums; it’s crazy.

I don’t really have any instant advice for these kinds of kids except to be true to yourself. Suffer for your art and hang on and maybe something will change where you actually have a chance. Right now, I don’t think they have much of a chance. I think all this “Get it on the internet!” stuff is BS and nonsense. You have to really connect with people. There aren’t very many clubs, there’s no place for people to develop and play. It’s a bad time right now for young artists. It’s not always about huge, giant commercial success; it’s about art, it’s about creativity, it’s about virtuosity. I worry about that, because it doesn’t look really good, but when I was a kid, it didn’t look good either. Big time success then was to be on a bus with seven other bands doing a gig where you did ninety shows in eighty days. I wasn’t kidding when I said, “Take acting lessons and work on your video,” because without that…

JC: Steve, we can look at a guy like Joe Bonamassa. I wrote a couple of songs on his album and Joe has forged a career out of basically using internet and his live playing and staying current with his fans and has made a career.

SM: Joe’s like me! He’s a guy who won’t be denied. Joe Bonamassa’s been grinding now for twenty years. He plays club by club, small gig by small gig, going to Europe and working and working and working and working and working and people love him and he’s a great guitar player. He should be forty times the size of the artist he is.

JC: Sure, but he’s still surviving in this business. My hat goes off to him.

SM: Oh, me too. My point is he’s tougher than five thousand other guitar players for all those reasons. That’s how hard it is to actually make it. He’s a perfect example of somebody who’s really, really strong and works really hard. He knows who he is and what he’s doing; he’s not some talented little kid with a manager who’s going to make his career. That’s rare…that’s really, really rare. There are a lot of great guitar players that you never get to hear. It’s been that way all my life. You finish doing a gig in front of twenty thousand people and go back to the hotel to The Boom-Boom Room at the top of The Sheraton and there’ll be some guy in there who will blow you away that nobody will ever hear of because they’re not tough enough to win in this gangster world of music, you know?

Transcribed By Galen Hawthorne

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A Conversation with JuiceBox and The Rad Trad’s Jamie Eblen

Mike Ragogna: Jamie! Okay, first of all, what is JuiceBox up to lately?

Jamie Eblen: JuiceBox is in a transitional phase. We just started working with new management and getting new gig opportunities. We also recorded an EP, First Cut, about a year ago, and at this point we’ve got about two more EPs’ worth of material, so we’re trying to figure out a time to get back into the studio more. And we’re gearing up for some shows this summer, so lots of things are in the works.

MR: Great. What are you doing regarding the EP? Is it only online, or are you pressing physical products?

JE: We do have physical CDs that you can order off our website, and we’ve also been making downloads available through iTunes and Band Camp, as well as CD Baby and I think Amazon.

MR: Do you find there are more sales from downloads or CDs?

JE: I’d say we get more downloads because the only place we’re really selling CDs is at shows, and the sales there are definitely less. It’s an impulse buy in a lot of ways.

MR: Gotta have the swag too, no?

JE: We’re working on getting some merchandise together. We don’t have shirts or anything like that at this point. It’s pretty much the CDs and the business cards… so you know where to find us!

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photo courtesy of JuiceBox

MR: [laughs] How did you get your gig with JuiceBox?

JE: I was the last member to come in. The band kind of formed out of a collection of people at NYU. Our singer, Lisa Ramey, is the only other one who didn’t go to NYU, and I came on late in the game because they were going on a tour to Italy and the drummer couldn’t make it. Nick Myers, the saxophone player, called me and said, “Hey, man, you wanna go to Italy?” I had just come back from study abroad in Florence for five months, and I was about to jump on any opportunity to go back to Italy, so that’s kind of how I came into it. They had existed for about a year or two before I joined them.

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photo credit: Daniel Gootnick

MR: But you came into it with a solid jazz background, in addition to a rock background.

JE: Yeah. My favorite drummer hands down is John Bonham, so I’m always coming from that and the jazz perspective, as well as funk and soul. But the band definitely has a jazz vibe to it, with the horns, guitar and organ; our organist Dave Mainella is fantastic. So it’s got a lot of different stuff happening, which is what I really enjoy about the band.

MR: Your parents, Ed Eblen and writer Robyn Flans, are pretty much music biz fixtures.

JE: They definitely are. Both have great faith in music, my dad being a drummer and my mom being a person who writes about drummers and musicians. So it’s been a life full of music education.

MR: Your dad taught you how to play, right?

JE: Yeah. I spent a lot of time digging up old drums with my dad and figuring out how to play rock beats that he taught me. When I was really young I had a little CB drum set. I got that when I was in sixth grade, and he taught me rock beats. Also he and my mom hooked up Ed Shaughnessy’s old drum set to be in my bedroom. So that was kind of amazing to have that.

MR: Was that inspirational?

JE: A little bit, yeah. The first groove I learned on that drum set that my dad helped me with was the “Come Together” groove.

MR: Nice. Your dad’s very experienced, having played in a lot of clubs and with different bands in California, Nashville, and all sorts of places.

JE: Yeah, Vegas, Nashville, New York recently; many different places. So over the course of time I imagine I will have travelled a lot of the same places as he has. I just went on tour with another band, and I was calling him from different places, like, “Hey, I’m in Indiana now, you ever been here?” It was funny.

MR: What are the elements of JuiceBox, insofar as how do you guys create the material?

JE: I would say it’s very democratic; someone brings an idea or a really fleshed-out song, it varies, and then we all sit together, play through it a bunch, talk about it, but we try to keep it mostly to the playing. I find that, as a band, when we get to work and just play the song over and over it sort of evolves over the course of a rehearsal. And then we record a tape, send it out, everyone listens to it, and then we workshop it the next time. But it all starts either with a jam vibe, which I’d say is less happening now because everyone’s bringing songs to the band then having band fully flesh them out. Or people will bring out fully written out charts. It varies.

MR: Are you hoping the listener is grooving to the music and wants to dance to it, and/or do you want them to just sit back and listen to the arrangements?

JE: Ideally, we play a room with a wide-open floor, no tables, no chairs, and a lot of people. That’s our ideal room. But we do a lot of other stuff. We play this club in New York called The General, and that’s much more of a dinner club vibe, and they’ve got tables and chairs and people sit. And they’re grooving, and I’d say that’s what we want. We want people grooving. If they’re grooving in their chairs, that’s fine with me.

MR: Did you bring in any of your Broadway experience into the group, you know, because you’ve been in Broadway musicals, etc.?

JE: Yeah. I’ve worked with Jason Robert Brown on various projects; Honeymoon in Vegas the most recent. There are a lot of things I bring from that experience. They all inform one another–the JuiceBox experience, the musical theater thing, playing a lot of different percussion, I’d say is an interesting thing about the Broadway world that I would be carrying over into JuiceBox. It’s hands-on a lot of different stuff which is a great sound for both vibes.

MR: You’re based out of Brooklyn. So they actually have music in Brooklyn? Whaaa?

JE: [laughs] I think it’s at a great place. There’s a lot of great music to find pretty much every night, and a lot of it’s close to me, and there’re music clubs opening up all the time. I’d say it’s definitely a burgeoning scene. I don’t know if there’s anything specifically at the helm of the Brooklyn scene because there are so many different things happening. It’s indie, and whatever it is that encompasses that. Folk rock; funk and jazz; it’s kind of a hodgepodge, which I think is what Brooklyn’s great at, but it’s also not necessarily focused. Right where I live in Prospect Heights there’s two jazz clubs within walking distance, and lots and lots of musicians. We have sessions at my apartment all the time with various jazz guys, or the Trad jazz band that I have.

MR: So, Jamie Eblen of Juicebox and let’s not forget The Rad Trads. What do you want to do with your life, young man!

JE: [laughs] It’s an interesting time right now. There’s a lot of different stuff that’s happening, but not necessarily a lot of stuff that’s happening right now, if that makes sense. This Broadway thing’s on hold; all this JuiceBox stuff is happening, and JuiceBox is my passion project; I write for this band and it’s very important to me. So I’m trying to go where the wind blows me, but I’m still involved in all of these things which is ideally what I want. It’s a limbo moment.

MR: What influences have Brooklyn and Manhattan had on your music?

JE: The vibes from across the river and in Brooklyn are very different, but you can find a lot of the same things in both places. I’d say every time we play a Brooklyn show, we’re playing to a lot of really excited young people, which is what we love to do. People who are either just out of school, still in school, or ten years out of school. And sometimes when we play Manhattan, especially at more dinner club vibes, that’s definitely an older crowd sitting and grooving to the music, which we love equally as much. But it is a much different vibe and we bring a different energy…not that we bring a different energy, but there’s a different energy in the room when we play those opposing shows.

MR: Where to do you feel jazz is going?

JE: Honestly, I don’t know. Modern jazz is modern jazz and that will be a thing that’s happening. I listened to a lot of it years ago, and my personal taste has taken me elsewhere. I’m sure I’ll come back to it, but there’s an interesting resurgence of hot jazz and that kind of thing in New York City. People love that, and there’s tons of it.

MR: Does it feel like your career is coming at you quickly now?

JE: It’s kind of an illusion; it feels like that, but it’s not necessarily the case. I’ll wake up every day and think, “Okay, same thing,” and I never think it’s going to be a thing where I wake up and something’s different. But as I said, a lot of things are on hold, so it seems like I’m just in a crazy place.

MR: You also have a wonderfully talented musical sister, Taylor Leigh Eblen, right?

JE: [laughs] I do. She’s currently working on her teaching degree at Queens College. She’s doing really well, she loves teaching and working with kids.

MR: Does she ever jam with you?

JE: Most recently, we’ve just been working on music together. She has to learn a lot of percussion and other instruments for her classes. She has to be able to do everything at least a little bit, so I’ve been working with her on percussion stuff, so we haven’t really had time just to jam recently.

MR: Do you think that may be coming down the pike at some point? The Eblen assault on the music world?

JE: Definitely. I’d love to collaborate with her and record some stuff.

MR: What’s your advice for new artists?

JE: It depends on where you are. I’m very New York City-minded right now, but I’d say to just keep on keeping on. That’s my thing, because you go through very different phases, highs and lows, and you have to be as stable as you can be and still enjoy every moment of it.

MR: Stable as in trying to have a stable life?

JE: Stable as in not letting what you do affect how you live. If things aren’t going well, then not treating that as an excuse to not live healthily.

MR: Nice. Speaking of living healthily, rumor has it you currently are living in an apartment with about ten people…

JE: [laughs] I’d say during the weekdays, it’s five and during the weekends, it’s twelve. We have a lot of people coming through this apartment–people from Boston, people from Philly, etc.; friends to play music. It’s crazy but it’s really fun. So yes, I currently live with four other guys also doing music and writing-relating adventures.

MR: Has the environment evolved into a workshop?

JE: Yes, in a lot of ways. Everyone’s been picking up the sticks recently and we have drum circles, and people listen to other people’s songs and we learn and play them, so it’s a pretty cool vibe we’ve got going on here.

MR: We spoke about Manhattan and Brooklyn, but you’ve been a bit of a globetrotter, as well. Is it a goal to play more places in the world?

JE: Oh, definitely. That’s a major goal for me. That’s my motivation for all of this, the motivation to travel. I love doing that and playing music abroad and experiencing different cultures, through music especially. I find that sharing that experience with any audience is pretty universal, but it’s also different in each place you go, and that I love. JuiceBox went to Italy twice now, and both times were so incredible.

MR: How do you picture yourself five years from now?

JE: That’s a tough question. I’m loving living in New York City right now, but I would say that with how expensive things are here, I would need to be at the next level musically, gigging and all that, just to be able to live comfortably. And going back to L.A. isn’t really a thing I want. In five years I want to be here but also traveling. I’d love that. Spending a little time in New York and a lot of time somewhere else, and using New York as a launching pad. Traveling the US is something I’d really like to do, too, because I haven’t done a lot of it.

MR: Think you might be working on any sort of father/son project with your dad?

JE: There’s been nothing talked about, but that sounds awesome. I’d definitely be down to record some drums. We’ve jammed and worked on music in the past, but nothing is officially documented, and that is something to be done.

2014-05-12-10341644_10152099152158671_1971615483234275501_n.jpg
photo credit: Michael Fatum

Transcribed by Emily Fotis
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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Ashley Madison - Have an affair. Married Dating, Affairs, Married Women, Extramarital Affair

Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs


FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE BESTSELLING BIOGRAPHIES OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN AND ALBERT EINSTEIN, THIS IS THE EXCLUSIVE BIOGRAPHY OF STEVE JOBS. Based on more than forty interviews with Jobs conducted over two years–as well as interviews with more than a hundred family members, friends, adversaries, competitors, and colleagues–Walter Isaacson has written a riveting story of the roller-coaster life and searingly intense personality of a creative entrepreneur whose passion for perfection and ferocious drive revolutionized six industries: personal computers, animated movies, music, phones, tablet computing, and digital publishing. At a time when America is seeking ways to sustain its innovative edge, and when societies around the world are trying to build digital-age economies, Jobs stands as the ultimate icon of inventiveness and applied imagination. He knew that the best way to create value in the twenty-first century was to connect creativity with technology. He built a company where leaps of the imagination were combined with remarkable feats of engineering. Although Jobs cooperated with this book, he asked for no control over what was written nor even the right to read it before it was published. He put nothing off-limits. He encouraged the people he knew to speak honestly. And Jobs speaks candidly, sometimes brutally so, about the people he worked with and competed against. His friends, foes, and colleagues provide an unvarnished view of the passions, perfectionism, obsessions, artistry, devilry, and compulsion for control that shaped his approach to business and the innovative products that resulted. Driven by demons, Jobs could drive those around him to fury and despair. But his personality and products were interrelated, just as Apple’s hardware and software tended to be, as if part of an integrated system. His tale is instructive and cautionary, filled with lessons about innovation, character, leadership, and values.

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Steve Madden Ladies Bdarren Hobo Stone Multi Handbag

Steve Madden Ladies Bdarren Hobo Stone Multi Handbag


Steve Madden Ladies Bdarren Hobo Stone Multi Handbag Brand: Steve Madden. Style Name: Bdarren. Color: Stone Multi. Size: 13H x 12.5L x 6.5W in; Strap 40in. Made In: Imported
List Price: $ 98.00
Price: $ 98.00

Steve Madden Ladies Bmandy Satchel Stone Multi Handbag

Steve Madden Ladies Bmandy Satchel Stone Multi Handbag


Steve Madden Ladies Bmandy Satchel Stone Multi Handbag Brand; Steve Madden. Style Name: Bmandy. Color: Stone Mutli. Size: 8.5H x 12L x 6.5W in Strap 47in. Made In: Imported
List Price: $ 88.00
Price: $ 88.00

Psycho Steve – I Swam the Solent to Freedom. No Jail Can Hold Me

Psycho Steve – I Swam the Solent to Freedom. No Jail Can Hold Me


When a GBP 1 million construction deal starts to go pear shaped, and a London heavy mob working for the opposition ransack his house, Stephen Moyle is out for revenge. In a tale of violence and adventure via the North of England and Canada, Stephen recounts the events that led to a 3 and a half year jail term and his eventual sectioning. Having taken revenge of the mob that was terrorising his family and business deals, Stephen was imprisoned in HMP Lewis; but with the voices of God Almighty and the Devil guiding his thoughts Stephen’s actions on the inside were to get him moved to HMP Camp Hill, Isle of Wight, from which he was to make his daring escape. Having scaled the prison walls and made his way through the razor wire, a scratched and bloody Stephen set off to swim across the Solent back to his family. His escape mobilised the D11 specialist police unit and the hunt began…Whilst on the run, Stephen returned to his scamming and thieving ways, but despite it all he found time to marry his long-term girlfriend Judith. But after the wedding things went from bad to worse as the voice of God was still present in Stephen’s thoughts; after a publican is almost killed the D11 squad close in and Stephen is returned to prison. Stephen is eventually released but his spell on the outside is short lived when he is re-arrested for GBH on his wife. At the court hearing, Stephen was sectioned for life and sent to Broadmoor Secure Hospital.
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Steve Wilkos Talks Jerry Springer And The Craziest Thing That Ever Happened (VIDEO)

Any Jerry Springer viewer knows how crazy the talk show can get, but Steve Wilkos’ story may take the cake.

While on HuffPost Live this week, the TV host opened up about a rather inappropriate moment on the notoriously dramatic talk show.

“Two guys were fighting, ripping their shirts off,” he explained. “This one guy gets his shirt taken off and he has a perfect formed female breast … and it’s gorgeous.”

The best part? He said he was born that way. Lady Gaga would be proud!

Comedy – The Huffington Post
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