Ryan Gosling & Eva Mendes Struggle to Teach Daughters Spanish

The famous couple reveals that they are trying to teach their daughters proper Spanish–but it's tough! "Latinx Now!" discusses.
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Christchurch shootings: Social sites struggle to contain attack video

Millions of copies of videos showing the Christchurch attacks have been removed from social media sites.
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Lakers struggle to keep playoff pace, feel the pressure

The Lakers had a glimpse of what they could be on Christmas Day, but now they wait for health, LeBron James’ return and the trade deadline.
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One Family’s Struggle to Get Their Daughter Lifesaving Medication

A treatment exists for a 6-year-old girl’s genetic disease. But a host of obstacles stand in the way of getting the drug.
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The struggle is real: Why hockey butts, jeans don’t mix

The drawback to a muscular posterior? It’s tough to find a pair of jeans that will fit. Connor McDavid and other NHL stars chronicle the struggle.
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Huawei Rivals Nokia and Ericsson Struggle to Capitalize on U.S. Scrutiny

U.S.-led efforts to curb Huawei should have been good news for telecom-equipment makers Nokia and Ericsson—but things haven’t turned out to be so simple.
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Huawei Rivals Nokia and Ericsson Struggle to Capitalize on U.S. Scrutiny

U.S.-led efforts to curb Huawei should have been good news for telecom-equipment makers Nokia and Ericsson—but things haven’t turned out to be so simple.
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Spice Girls announce extra dates after fans’ ticket struggle

The Spice Girls have added a string of new dates to their reunion tour after fans from around the world struggled to buy tickets.
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Life After American Idol: Inside Pia Toscano’s Attempted Comeback With Netflix’s Westside After Years of Struggle

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After Months of Struggle, NBC’s $69 Million Bet on Megyn Kelly Flames Out

An outcry over remarks Ms. Kelly made on the air about blackface Halloween costumes on Tuesday proved the last straw in the anchor’s rocky stint on the ‘Today’ show. NBC canceled her show Friday. Negotiations “about next steps” continue, her lawyer said.
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Defense Firms Struggle With Security-Clearance Backlog

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In the Fight Against Fake News, Facebook’s Fact-Checkers Struggle to Keep Up

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Affleck describes ‘lifelong struggle’ after rehab ends

Ben Affleck has completed a 40-day alcohol rehab programme, but said battling the addiction is a “lifelong and difficult struggle”.
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Books of The Times: At the Close of Karl Ove Knausgaard’s ‘My Struggle,’ a Magician Loses His Touch

Vital writing and interesting ideas are buried in this endurance test of a novel, which includes a 400-page section about Hitler in addition to Knausgaard’s usual autobiographical musings.
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Inside Twitter’s Long, Slow Struggle to Police Bad Actors

When Twitter Chief Executive Jack Dorsey testifies before Congress this week, he’ll likely be asked about an issue that has been hovering over the company: Just who decides whether a user gets kicked off the site?
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A Director Looks for Beauty in Her Home’s Opioid Struggle

With “Recovery Boys,” Elaine McMillion Sheldon aimed to tell the story of West Virginia’s opioid epidemic through the eyes of people who are fighting through it.
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Busy Philipps Shares Her Lifelong Struggle With Anxiety in Personal Video

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NHL, NHLPA struggle to get players to consider life after hockey

The Core Development Program, founded in October 2016, aims to facilitate the transition for active players to careers, and to give guidance on how to manage post-playing life. The critical part that’s missing right now? Getting players to participate.
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Schools struggle to get mental health help, says survey

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Health secretary Jeremy Hunt sorry as A&Es struggle to cope

Health secretary apologises after NHS bosses in England cancel thousands of non-urgent treatments.
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Books of The Times: From Ancient Myths to Modern Day, Women and the Struggle for Power

In “Women & Power: A Manifesto,” the Cambridge classicist Mary Beard describes the scale of the problem and suggests some exciting remedies.
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Books News: A Final Work by Sam Shepard Reveals His Struggle With Lou Gehrig’s Disease

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Uber rocked by fresh boardroom power struggle

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Lena Dunham Reveals Her Struggle With Rosacea, And For A Great Reason

“Nobody is immune from feeling bad about hateful attention.”
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Mondelez CEO Rosenfeld to Step Down as Big Food Brands Struggle

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Brie Bella Opens Up About Her Struggle to Get Pregnant Before Conceiving Birdie: “It Sucks”

Brie Bella, Maternity ShootBrie Bella didn’t have an easy time getting pregnant.
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13 Tweets That Perfectly Describe Struggle Of Sleeping With A Snorer

In a perfect world, you and your significant other would fall straight asleep cuddled in each other’s arms every night. But most of us don’t live in perfect worlds. We live in the world of hot sleepers, blanket hogs and… snorers

Snoring can be a sign of obstructive sleep apnea ― meaning if the snoring is regular, loud and sometimes causes gasping noises, your partner should get checked by his or her doctor. Other, less serious causes include drinking too much before bed, allergies, colds and sleeping on your back.

Regardless of the cause, the struggles of sleeping with a snorer are all too real. Just check out the tweets below.

Sarah DiGiulio is The Huffington Post’s sleep reporter. You can contact her at sarah.digiulio@huffingtonpost.com. 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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Frail, elderly people ‘left to struggle alone’

The number of over 65s not getting enough help rises as care services are “close to collapse”, says charity.
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The Struggle To Figure Out How A Song In A Kids’ Book Really Goes

Sometimes when you read a book to a child, you reach a part that’s meant to be sung. But what do you do when you don’t know the intended tune and don’t see any sheet music on the page?

According to the funny moms of the BreakWomb, you just make it up.

In their latest comedy video, the ladies debate the merits of their various musical interpretations of children’s book songs.

Let’s just say there’s quite a bit of variety in melody, tempo and tone. Clearly, they need a little guidance from Sandra Boynton herself … or this helpful CD.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Arts – The Huffington Post
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People Who Struggle to Get Out of Bed Are More Intelligent, Study Says

Here’s to all you night owls out there.

Lifestyle – Esquire

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Oddly Normal: One Family's Struggle to Help Their Teenage Son Come to Terms with His Sexuality

Oddly Normal: One Family's Struggle to Help Their Teenage Son Come to Terms with His Sexuality


Three years ago, John Schwartz, a national correspondent for The New York Times, got the call that every parent hopes never to receive: His thirteen-year-old son, Joe, was in the hospital following a suicide attempt. Mustering the courage to come out to his classmates, Joe had delivered a tirade about homophobic and sexist attitudes that was greeted with unease and confusion by his fellow students. Hours later, he took an overdose of pills. After a couple of weeks in the hospital and in the locked ward of a psychiatric treatment center, Joe returned to his family. As he recovered, his parents were dismayed by his school?s inability to address ? or reluctance to deal with ? Joe?s needs. Determined to help their son feel more comfortable in his own skin, Schwartz and his wife, Jeanne, launched their own search for services and groups that could help Joe know he wasn?t alone. In Oddly Normal, Schwartz writes of his family?s struggles within a culture that is changing fast – but not fast enough. Interweaving his narrative with contextual chapters on psychology, law, and common questions, Schwartz shares crucial lessons about helping gay kids learn how to cope in a potentially hostile world. From buying rhinestone-studded toddler shoes to creating a ?Joseph manual? for Joe?s teachers; from finding a hairdresser who stocks purple dye to fighting erroneous personality disorder diagnoses, Oddly Normal offers a deeply personal look into one boy?s growing up. Joe, far happier today than he was three years ago, collaborated on this work.
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‘Heather Has Two Mommies’ Author On The Struggle To Publish Gay Books

As we reflect on milestones made within the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community during October’s LGBT history month, HuffPost Live spoke with Lesléa Newman, the author of the groundbreaking 1989 children’s book Heather Has Two Mommies.

As the first lesbian-themed children’s book published, getting it to readers was a challenge. Newman explained to host Caroline Modarressy-Tehrani earlier this week that getting the book published was an entirely grassroots effort because nobody was willing to endorse it. She said the reception to its publishing was mixed — some “thrilled,” some “horrified.”

“Libraries were reporting that the book was either stolen or returned with its pages glued shut,” Newman recalled. “There was one library that found the book in the bathroom defecated upon. There were politicians who used the book for their own personal agenda. So all kinds of interesting things were happening during that time.” 

Finding publishers interested in picture books with a gay agenda is “still a struggle,” Newman said. But in 2008, she was finally approached to write a baby book featuring gay parents. 

“I was really pleased that the publishing world was coming to me after I had struggled so hard to put Heather out there,” Newman said. “But obviously, you know, a lot has happened especially in the marriage equality movement that’s made the world a better place, I think, for all of us and all our families.”

Watch the full segment on Lesbian history: from Sappho to Ellen here. 

Want more HuffPost Live? Stream us anytime on Go90, Verizon’s mobile social entertainment network, and listen to our best interviews on iTunes.

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— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




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The Struggle That Only People With Glasses Understand

A dear friend recently told me a story about the first time I wore contact lenses. I began to reflect on what an impact wearing glasses has had on my life and my self-esteem.

I’ve worn glasses for almost 50 years and I still don’t like wearing my thick lenses in public. At midlife I should be over this already. I mean, I’ve made peace with so many things by now that I think it’s time to put this behind me.

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I’ve made peace with having to wear flats instead of high heels. I’ve reconciled myself to the fact that I need to wear foundation and mascara instead of going au naturel whenever I walk out the front door.

And I’ve even learned to embrace my thick, curly locks instead of trying to straighten my hair every time I blow dry it. I used to want to look like Cheryl Tiegs. That worked out well, don’t you think?

My second grade teacher, Mrs. Miller, knew how I felt. Out of two second grade classes at South End School I was the only 8 year old wearing glasses. A compassionate teacher, she purchased a book that told the story about a cool little girl who wore glasses and one day read it to the class. It made me feel good. For a few days.

In 1967 there was only one style of glasses offered for girls. They were powder blue “cat” frames with tiny shimmering “diamonds” in each corner. I hid mine in my desk as I squinted to see the blackboard.

In eighth grade my parents gave me permission to get contact lenses. In those days only hard lenses were available, and my patient mother sat beside me for hours on end as I did my best to shove those uncomfortable little discs into my eyes. When I finally succeeded they were so uncomfortable I popped them right back out.

Sorry, Mom.

It was back to wearing my funky John Lennon glasses again.

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Here I am at age 14 when I spent the summer in Israel. I went with a group of other high school students and it was a magical six weeks. But wearing glasses that summer with a bunch of kids whose hormones were raging, well, it made a difference in my mind.

I think in many ways I began hiding behind my glasses, uncomfortable with the way I thought I looked without them. It was impossible to know how I looked because without my glasses on I couldn’t see my face clearly.

My parents always told me I was beautiful, but you know how parents are.

During adolescence how you look is very important. It didn’t help that my three closest friends were blonde, beautiful and had perfect vision. Thinking back I guess I felt less attractive than them because of my glasses.

When senior year of high school rolled around I finally decided to try wearing contact lenses again. One, two, three and those soft lenses were in my eyes and working their magic. Glory hallelujah.

It’s funny that a few short weeks after my success I was asked out on my first serious date. School boys are so transparent, aren’t they?

I rarely wore my glasses after that except to take them out at night and put them back in the next morning. But during my sophomore year at college that was a mistake.

My all-girl dorm had a large bathroom on each floor and the only place to hang your bathrobe (and glasses) while showering was over the top of the shower bar. With the water running I didn’t hear the footsteps of girls quietly swiping my glasses and bathrobe. I was mortified when I had to run down the hall with my tiny towel wrapped around me, barely able to find my room through the cloudy blur I saw around me. When I finally made it back I found my bathrobe and glasses on my bed.

Ah, college pranks.

When I began dating my husband I swore I’d never let him see me in my glasses. One night I nearly panicked as I waited for him to pick me up for dinner. My left eye hurt so badly I was unable to wear my left contact lens. What did I do? I went on the date wearing only my right one.

That was a big mistake. By the time we got to the restaurant my right eye began to hurt and I was forced to remove my right lens.

As luck would have it, two fuzzy looking people stopped by our table. Gary’s voice sounded surprised, and I sat in silence as they talked, making pretend I could see who these people were.

“Cathy, these are my parents,” Gary said. “Mom and Dad, this is Cathy.”

Gulp.

I don’t remember much else except praying that I didn’t look like a complete idiot. I must have performed an Oscar worthy performance because years later my in-laws told me they had no idea I couldn’t see them.

The next time I met them I continued the performance by making pretend I knew who they were.

Today young girls and boys wear glasses almost as a creative expression of themselves. With a wider variety available in every size, shape and color, and the ability to offer glare-free and thinner lenses, it’s easy to find one that looks good and suits their personality.

I hadn’t thought about my saga of my glasses until last week. During a FaceTime session with three dear friends (who I’ve known since I was 10) we began to reminisce. One of them told me she remembered the first time I looked at myself in the mirror after successfully wearing contacts. She went on to tell me how fascinated I was to finally get a clear look at myself.

Then she added, “I think your writing reflects what you found that day. You see things more clearly and are able to explain to others the lens with which you see the world.”

Wow.

I’ve thought about what she said ever since, and it’s made me realize that it’s time to embrace who I am with and without my glasses. That’s the beauty of midlife. You are finally able to become more comfortable in your own skin.

So I’ll keep on writing with and without my glasses because the lens I use to see the world doesn’t depend on whether or not I’m wearing glasses. The lens I use to see the world is tucked inside my heart.

And I’m comfortable with that. So here I am with my glasses. Hello, world!

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This post was previously published on Cathy’s blog, An Empowered Spirit.

Cathy Chester is an award-winning writer and health advocate who has lived with Multiple Sclerosis for 28 years. In her blog An Empowered Spirit she writes about finding the joy in life despite disability. But MS does not define her, so she also writes about living a quality life in midlife, social good causes, animal rights, book and movie reviews, and the importance of using compassion and kindness as a way of making the world a better place.

Follow Cathy on Twitter at @cathyches.

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The Very Real Struggle Of Getting A 4-Year-Old To Go Potty On A Road Trip

In “Car Pee Diem,” the newest episode of “Convos With My 4-Year-Old,” dad Matthew Clarke and his “daughter,” played by David Milchard, are — like so many families this holiday season — on a road-trip.

The duo is dealing with one of the most common problems facing parents and preschoolers during such an adventure. Young Coco has to go to the bathroom, so Daddy must pull over at a gas station. But then she doesn’t have to go. But then she does…. And through it all, one important rule remains: Don’t touch anything!

More ‘Convos’ videos here…

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The Struggle to Reach Out and Tell the Climate Story

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Photo Credit: Lightspring / Shutterstock.com

“Nope, no. No. Nuh-uh. These aren’t good.”

I’m sitting next to one of my instructors at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School of Journalism where I’m taking a course in multimedia. We’re going through a series of photographs I’d taken for an assignment and he’s critiquing them.

“The photos don’t make me feel anything,” he says.

The day before, I had gone out to shoot photos with an agenda: to find a story about climate change and how it affects people — the same thing I do every day at work. I intended to find a science person to interview about the California drought and work in a climate change angle. But that was not going to happen. The instructors had given us an insanely tight deadline for a series of assignments — all due simultaneously — and restricted the location for our stories. On top of that, I was struggling with unfamiliar equipment.

The instructors also told us not to get blocked into our initial vision. But I was blocked and I was ticked off, too. It was obvious that I was not going to have my way. I felt like I was being pressed into an assignment that was impossible to complete within the allotted time frame. And frankly, I also thought the assignment was beyond my skill set and unrealistic for me.

But the assignment was due and there was no way I was going to quit. I was out in the field, walking around, and I absolutely had to find a stranger, interview him or her and make it work, period, end of story, done. Wandering through my assigned neighborhood, I stopped to admire a well-groomed garden in the front yard of one of the homes. When the homeowner, Migdalia Collazo, walked out onto her porch, I asked if she would allow me to photograph and interview her.

During that first photo shoot, I focused on composition, color, light and context, thinking that was the route to a compelling shot. But my photos were lacking the most important element: a compelling story, something to feel.

After the critique, my teacher’s words stayed with me, reverberating in my head:

The photos don’t make me feel anything.
The photos don’t make me feel anything.
The photos don’t make me feel anything.

As a climate and Earth science communicator, I find this is the biggest challenge. We’re in a constant fight to capture attention, to move people, to make them care about how their behavior is affecting Earth.

To feel something.

But we get caught up with logical analysis of facts and don’t understand why many people don’t hear our stories. This is incredibly frustrating because, for us, climate change is so important, so dire, such a big deal. We desperately want to reach out and let our stories be told, to find the right way for the meaning to get through.

So from now on, I’m committed. My goal is to find a way to inspire you to feel something.

I look forward to reading your comments,
Laura

This post originally appeared on NASA’s Earth Right Now blog.

This blog post is part of the #WhyICare blog series, curated by the editors of HuffPost Generation Change in recognition of the People’s Climate March in New York City on September 21, 2014. To see all the other posts in the series, click here.

Join the conversation on Twitter and tell us why you care about the climate crisis with the hashtags #WhyICare and #PCM. For more information about the People’s Climate March, click here.



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This Is What Your Morning Struggle Really Looks Like

Mornings can be tough to navigate. In a perfect world, they’d be filled with chirping birds and traffic-free commutes. But on most days, it feels like we are living Murphy’s Law. We’ve partnered with McDonald’s© to take a look at the morning struggle we can’t seem to avoid. Do you feel our pain?

8:00 AM: You’re woken up by your alarm clock, which triggers an overwhelming urge to break something. Instead, you hit snooze.

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GIF: giphy.com

8:10 AM: A couple of snoozes later, you glance at the clock. There’s a terrifying instant in which you think it’s much later than it actually is. To your delight, you were wrong! You take a second to honor the small victories in life, and then you go back to sleep.

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GIF: giphy.com

8:25 AM: After the fifth buzz, you finally relent. But now it really is late.

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GIF: giphy.com

8:26 AM: A sudden calm comes over you as you jump out of bed with a clear vision of what needs to get done.

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GIF: gurl.com

8:30 AM: After getting dressed in a spastic scramble, you check your work in the mirror.

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GIF: giphy.com

8:31 AM: Breakfast time! Expectation:

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8:35 AM: Reality:

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8:40 AM: You get out the door and head to your favorite coffee place. This is you in line:

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GIF: reactiongifs.us

8:45 AM: This is you once the coffee is in your possession:

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GIF: giphy.com

8:50 AM: You realize that some sort of miracle is going to have to occur for you to get to work on time. You send a silent prayer to the universe for green lights.

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GIF: imgarcade.com

9:00 AM: You hit all of the red lights.

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GIF: giphy.com

9:05 AM: Might as well make the most of it. You put on your jam.

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GIF: weheartit.com

9:10 AM: You arrive at work and stroll in 10 minutes late, but no one seems to notice. You decide to accept it and own it.

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GIF: giphy.com

9:15 AM: Finally at your desk, you glance at your email and promise yourself that you’ll do better tomorrow.

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GIF: giphy.com

Mornings may not be the easiest part of the day, but there are ways to make them a little brighter. McDonald’s McCafé© and Egg McMuffin© are pick-me-ups that can help you get from A to B that much faster. Maybe you’ll even be five minutes early.

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It’s Good to Know a Miracle: Dani’s Story: One Family’s Struggle with Leukemia

It’s Good to Know a Miracle: Dani’s Story: One Family’s Struggle with Leukemia


In this inspirational and informative book, Dani’s parents, Jay and Sue Shotel, vividly convey the strength and courage their daughter displayed in her battle with AML, as they tell the story of the events that led to her recovery. Along the way they provide a wealth of information about leukemia, and tell engrossing stories about their family’s journey to an unknown place, the roles each family member played to support Dani in her fight for life, the value of love and friendship, the anguish in the quest for answers, the power of positive thinking, the vital decisions a family must make as they proceed through the medical maze, and about the young German citizen, Tom–who donated the marrow that saved Dani’s life and then flew in to Washington, D.C., to attend Dani and Scott’s wedding in 2005! The vivid details in It’s Good to Know a Miracle: Dani’s Story, are made possible because Sue Shotel insisted that the family keep a log of everything that occurred during the period from September 11, 2002, until Dani’s release from the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and return to Washington, D.C. in May of 2003. In telling their story, the authors hope that the level of detail provided in this book will assist families who face similar circumstances in dealing with the known, the unknown, and the decisions that need to be made along the way. Reviews: “One of 10 Health Books in 2008 ‘You’ll Actually Want to Read’”—Laura Landro, Wall Street Journal “This is a book that will touch your heart as well as take you on a grueling journey with a happy ending.”—Anne Stinson, Book Critic, Easton Star Democrat Endorsements: “This is an amazing story of a woman who stayed strong in the struggle to fight (and WIN!) for her life. Her dedication, passion and insights in coping with the emotional and physical pain during her journey no doubt played major roles in her ability to ‘beat leukemia’. She is an inspiring figure and gives hope to all of us who ultimately will experience a life’s grea

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