‘That Myth Is Dead’: MAD Magazine Questions Trump’s America

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Why Carrie Underwood Went from Working Out 6 Days a Week to Just 1 or 2: ‘That Just Kind of Has to Be Okay’

Only made it to the gym twice this week? Then you and Carrie Underwood have something in common.

Though the superstar singer is known for her sculpted legs, she admitted Thursday that she isn’t working out as much as she used to.

“I used to work out six days a week,” Underwood, 34, told E!. “But now that’s a little rare, sometimes it’s one or two times a week and that just kind of has to be okay. And it is okay because whatever I’m doing that’s keeping me out of the gym is important.”

And the Nashville crooner certainly has plenty on her plate. Along with her music, Underwood has her Calia by Carrie Underwood activewear line and a busy life with her husband Mike Fisher, who just retired from the NHL after making it to the Stanley Cup Finals, and their 2-year-old son Isaiah.

Underwood says she makes family time a priority over the gym, but when she does get in a workout, it often becomes a family affair — especially when Isaiah crashes her workouts.

“He probably will, 90% of the time, wander into my workout session,” she said. “But it’s nice to be able to stop and give him a kiss.”

Fisher will join in too, but even the former professional athlete can’t keep up with Underwood.

“Mainly, when we work out together, we’re just working out in the same space,” she said. “But I will say, the other day I was doing the ab wheel … and later on that day, Mike said something like, ‘I’m not ready for the ab wheel yet.’ ”

And along with her ab routine, Underwood will do sprints and lunges in her hilly neighborhood.

“I do a lot of squats, I do a lot of lunges, I do a lot of curtsy lunges, I do a lot of goblet squats, I use the leg press machine,” she said.


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Hate and violence around the globe? There’s an app for that.

Hate and violence around the globe? There’s an app for that.The plague of “fake news” may be news to Facebook (FB), but it’s a familiar foe to a small non-profit in Washington that’s trying to use mobile apps, big data and social media to promote peace and accountability in places like Iraq, Kenya and Mexico where those technologies have often been abused to spread lies and hate. The PeaceTech Lab aims to develop “technology that can be applied to tackle the triggers of violence,” president and CEO Sheldon Himelfarb said in an interview at the lab’s Washington headquarters at the U.S. Institute of Peace.



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Family Drama, Donald Trump & That Voicemail: 9 Best Jokes from Alec Baldwin’s Roast

 

Family drama, embarrassing moments and political views were all fair game during Alec Baldwin‘s Sunday night roast at the Apollo Theater in New York City.

Baldwin, 59, braved the hot seat as a lineup of his costars, family and friends honored (and poked fun at) his career during the taping of Spike’s One Night Only: Alec Baldwin, which will air July.

The roster of roasters included Still Alice onscreen wife Julianne Moore, real-life wife Hilaria30 Rock cast mates Jane Krakowski, Tracy Morgan and Jack McBrayer, and, last but not least, daughter Ireland — who addressed her father’s infamous voicemail rant.

Former president Bill Clinton also made a surprise appearance, introducing Baldwin with a heartfelt speech.

“I think I’ve figured out what has made him both a great actor and a great person: He has genuine interest in other people,” Clinton said in his closing remarks. “When you look at the sweep of his career, you see a man with enormous talent and a heart just as big.”

With Oscar, Tony and Emmy nominations, Baldwin has more than 100 credits to his acting career, with roles in iconic films like The Departed, Beetlejuice and The Hunt for Red October.

Seeing as the actor’s most recent scene-stealing role was as Saturday Night Live‘s President Donald Trump stand-in, a portion of the night’s jokes were aimed at the current White House administration. The majority of the evening’s roasters have been open about their anti-Trump sentiments, including Robert De Niro, who famously called him an “idiot” pre-election.

FROM PEN: Learn The Process Behind Selecting TIME’s 100 Most Influential People

 

Baldwin’s younger brother Stephen, who has vocalized his support for Trump, was not in attendance for the taping, resulting in a pointed jab from brothers Billy and Daniel, who quipped that Stephen was “on guard at Trump Tower.”

Here are a few more of the evening’s very best zingers:

“I wouldn’t know an alternative fact if it hit me in the face.” —Bill Clinton

“I loved working with Alec — it was the first time I wasn’t the craziest motherf—er on the set. Now I know white people families are just as f—ed up as black people families.” —Tracy Morgan

“The best part about being married to a man Alec’s age is the sex lasts two hours: an hour and 58 minutes to walk up the stairs and two minutes of sex.”—Hilaria Baldwin

“In Glengarry Glen Ross he played a smug a–hole and he’s never broken character.” —Robert De Niro

“You obviously have a lot of friends. They just couldn’t be here tonight.” —Jack McBrayer

“I don’t know you that well. My publicist told me to be here.” —Jane Krakowski

“Yes, I’m Ireland. And I’m a Baldwin. I can’t remember which ones are on speaking terms.” —Ireland Baldwin

“If you work with him, you are guaranteed to win an Oscar. His mojo is so strong, I wouldn’t be surprised if this year Melania Trump walks away with Best Supporting .” —Julianne Moore

One Night Only: Alec Baldwin airs July 9 at 9 p.m. ET on Spike.


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Katy Perry on ‘I Kissed a Girl’: ‘Truth Be Told, I Did More Than That!’

When Katy Perry released the pop hit “I Kissed a Girl and I Liked It” in 2008, she says she was starting a conversation with people around the world.

“Truth be told, I did more than that!” she told the audience of the2017 HRC Los Angeles Gala while accepting the National Equality Award on Saturday night. “But how was I going to reconcile that with the gospel-singing girl raised in youth groups that were pro conversion camps? What I did know was that I was curious, and even then I knew that sexuality was not as black and white as this dress.

“But in 2008, when that song came out, I knew that it started a conversation that a lot of the world seemed curious enough to sing along to it.”

Perry went on to detail her religious upbringing (both of her parents are pastors) and how she “prayed the gay away at Jesus camps.” But soon her “bubble started to burst” and she discovered people who were different from her.

“These people were nothing like I had been taught to fear. They were the most free, strong, kind, and inclusive people that I have ever met,” she said. “They stimulated my mind, and they filled my heart with joy, and they danced with joy while doing it. These people are actually, magic, and they are magic because they are living their truth.”

From Coinage: See Where 6 Stars Were Before They Were Famous

Although she strayed away from the beliefs of her religion, Perry says she wouldn’t have chosen a different path for herself: “Priceless lessons happen large. The path of discovery has made me, has tested me, and forever changed me. You don’t get to choose your family, but you can choose your tribe,” she said. “I stand here as real evidence for all that no matter where you came from it is about where you are going, that real change, real evolution, and that real perception shift can happen, if we open our minds and soften our hearts.”

The pop star added that it would’ve been a lot easier for her to stay the “whipped-creamed-t–s-springing-poppy-lite-coffee-fun-anthem-animal-totem-singing-girl” who remained neutral politically.

“No longer can I sit in silence,” she says. “I have to stand up what I feel is true and that is equality and justice for all, period.”


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Behind The Tutus, Ballet Is A Boys’ Club. This Ballerina Wants To Fix That.

Ballerina Ashley Bouder is crying. She’s standing alone in a rehearsal studio in front of 20 or so dance journalists and several funders of her small self-titled ballet company, and she’s crying. And I’m pretty sure it’s my fault.

She’s just finished showing us a snippet of pas de deux that she choreographed, and that she’ll perform in just over a week’s time with her fellow New York City Ballet principal dancer Andrew Veyette. The entire evening of dancing is devoted to women choreographers and to women composers. In over 15 years of dancing with City Ballet, Bouder tells the assembled crowd, she’s danced works by about 40 choreographers and can count only seven women among them. She can’t name a single woman composer whose music she’s danced to ― not a single one.

Which brings us to why Bouder is crying. I’ve asked her why it matters to her that more women be allowed to choreograph ballets. What does gender have to do with it?, I ask, channeling the purportedly gender-blind proponents of pure, context-free meritocracy. Ballet is ballet, right? Does it really make a difference if it’s made by a man or a woman?

She takes a deep breath, and begins to answer, her voice breaking before she can get more than a few words out. “I think a lot of it is about telling little girls that they can. I have a daughter. As a kid, I was told that I can’t, a lot. For me, to have my voice be relevant, and for people to listen, is really important. To say what I have to say, even if they don’t like it. I get to say it.” The room erupts into applause, and Bouder wipes her eyes and nods, her short brown ponytail bobbing.

Bouder joined the New York City Ballet at the age of 16, after spending a year in its feeder school. As a member of the corps de ballet, she was soon assigned soloist roles, and quickly promoted to the top rank of principal. For nearly half her life, she’s been dancing in one of the world’s best ballet companies, the keeper of the flame of founding choreographer George Balanchine, whose vocabulary of movement and once-avant garde style long ago became synonymous with American ballet.

Bouder describes herself as a “Balanchine ballerina,” and is admired for her mastery of quick footwork and speedy jumps. Where other ballerinas seem to drape themselves, long and languid, over choreography, Bouder appears to throw herself at it with staccato precision. After watching her attack turns and balances, you wouldn’t be surprised to find that she’d pierced a hole in the stage floor with her pointe shoe.

The lion’s share of choreography performed by City Ballet is by Balanchine, who died in 1983. In his absence, other choreographers have added to the repertory he built with help from Jerome Robbins. Current Ballet Master in Chief Peter Martins, and choreographers Christopher Wheeldon and Justin Peck, in particular, have left their respective marks on the company. You’ve probably noticed one thing those choreographers have in common: They’re all men.

The dearth of women choreographers has confounded parts of the dance world for some time: every few years, the debate over the overrepresentation of men in the ranks of top-tier choreographers, particularly in classical ballet, comes to a new boil before simmering down again. It’s not only choreography where women get short shrift. The ballerina may be the visual symbol of the art form, but behind the scenes, the levers of power and creative control are largely pulled by men. The overwhelming majority of companies in the U.S. are helmed by male artistic directors, and the choreographers they tap are mostly creating work set to music by male composers.

But a few years ago, the debate heated up again when City Ballet performed a program entitled “21st Century Choreographers,” featuring work by a handful of young modern ballet dance-makers, every single one of them a white man. The poster was jarring in its uniformity, and people took notice. “How can an art form be alive,” Dance magazine asked, “when it excludes so many?”

“Women bring a point of view that men don’t have,” Bouder tells me later in a phone interview. “But it doesn’t have to be anything particularly different to the table. It’s about having an equal voice to express our opinions and our feelings, too.” She says that because she’s in a position of power ― a top-tier dancer at a top-tier company, with a sizeable fan base and following. She wants to use it to speak out about inequities in the ballet world. “People will listen, and I think choreography by women just needs to be seen and heard.”

Starting this week, she’s also walking the talk. The Ashley Bouder Project is teaming up with New York Jazzharmonic for an evening of women-created works: two new ballets, both choreographed by women and set to music by women, and the revival of a Susan Stroman ballet set to music by Duke Ellington. They’ll all be danced by Bouder and her friends from City Ballet, including several fellow principals.

Other, more established companies have begun to put on similar programs. Pacific Northwest Ballet presented one last year, and the Cincinnati Ballet just announced that in their upcoming season, eight out of 15 choreographers whose work will be performed are women, five of whom are presenting world premieres.

Bouder hopes that City Ballet will be more conscious as it crafts its programs and picks choreographers, too. The pale male poster fail “was a big turning point,” Bouder said. “It’s not like any of those choreographers on that poster of five white men didn’t deserve to be there. They’re all talented, they all have great voices, and they’re creative and their ballets are good. But it’s really shocking when you go past the poster and you see five men who look almost identical in their black-and-white headshots!”

Negative media coverage of the homogenous programming had an effect, she notes: the next fall season the company performed works by two women, Annabelle Lopez Ochoa and principal dancer Lauren Lovette. “That was wonderful,” Bouder said. “There was a response to that criticism and that public outcry of ‘Where are the women?’” She hopes the small uptick in the inclusion of women isn’t a flash in the pan or a short-lived trend. “We’re such a big company, and people really follow the example of the New York City Ballet, so I hope they will continue to foster the contributions of women in the company. I hope that continues, and I think that it will.”

Boulder says that companies have a responsibility to help close the gender gap in choreography, long before it comes time to craft an all-women or women-heavy program. “I think that special attention needs to be paid, especially in places that foster creativity and choreography, to fostering those young female choreographers and giving them a little bit more attention,” Bouder said. “A little more of a chance to develop, and listening to them a little more when they’re young and say they want to choreograph.” The New York City Choreographic Institute, which is affiliated with City Ballet and has trained many of today’s leading ballet choreographers, should heed her advice: their list of alumni is almost comically male-dominated.

Though companies have a role to play, Bouder points out that some of the inequities that make it easier for men to be creative and to start learning to choreograph early are built into the fabric of the art form. For dancers in the corps, “when a lot of people are young and they have ideas and they want to do things,” the workload for women is heavier than it is for men. In most ballet companies, because of how ballets are structured, women perform more than men. “You put on a ballet like [Balanchine’s Walpurgisnacht Ballet] and there’s one guy and, like, 20 women. [Editor’s Note: It’s actually 24.] At New York City Ballet, our guys dance a lot more, but the women do far more than they do. Even if there are guys who are on every night, there are women who are on in three ballets every night. Which means more rehearsal time, too, during the day. Which means less creative time.” Even women’s stage makeup takes more time, Bouder notes, and so does breaking in and sewing ribbons on to pointe shoes, which professional ballerinas must do on a daily basis. In her early years, Bouder says, “I was on stage every night and then I had to go home and sew my pointe shoes. You’re just preoccupied.” Creativity requires time, and men have more of it than women do.

You need more than time to be bold and take risks — you also need a culture that gives you permission to do it. And Bouder says that boys in ballet are far more likely to get that than girls are. Because girls outnumber boys in ballet schools as well as in companies, she explains, they’re held to a higher disciplinary standard. “There are so many little girls that they need to almost weed them out, the ones who are serious and the ones who aren’t.” So, she says, “you have to be perfect, not only in class but in attitude and decorum and you have to fit in and be quiet. And the boys in some cases are allowed to just get away with murder … but it doesn’t matter because they’re just trying to keep them in the class and keep them dancing, because you need boys to partner the girls.” This means more freedom outside of the studio, too. “And they’re allowed to be creative and they’re allowed to try things, and girls are not. They can just do whatever as long as they keep showing up.”

And then, the boys become men, and they get to make the ballets and run the companies? I ask. That seems like a pretty raw deal for the women. Bouder agrees. “It’s really unfair when you’ve spent your whole life playing by the rules, only to be stifled.” 

Bouder became a mother last year, shortly after a video of her doing an eye-popping pirouette combination while almost nine months pregnant went viral. She wasn’t back to full dancing strength in time to work with the two women choreographers whose works were performed at City Ballet this season. So she’s taking matters into her own hands. “I feel like I’ve gotten to the point in my career where I can get a message out and people will listen and maybe I can make a difference…. So that it doesn’t have to be this way. I want to be a voice for that, and I also want to be an example of someone who is actively trying to make a difference.”

Bouder says that having a daughter has changed the way she thinks about which voices get heard, and which get silenced. And it’s also made her more daring outside of the studio and offstage. “Having my daughter just makes me braver,” she says. “It makes me want to step out and do the things that I hope she has the courage to do.”

The Ashley Bouder Project will perform with New York Jazzharmonic Friday, March 17, and Saturday, March 18, at Symphony Space.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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The ‘WTF Is That’ Bot Tells You What’s in Your Photos. Well, Sometimes

The ‘WTF Is That’ Bot Tells You What’s in Your Photos. Well, Sometimes

When it’s right, the WTF Is That bot for Facebook Messenger is impressive. When it’s wrong, it’s hilarious. The post The ‘WTF Is That’ Bot Tells You What’s in Your Photos. Well, Sometimes appeared first on WIRED.
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10 Moments From The ‘All That’ Reunion That Were All That

Ready yet? Get set. It’s the “All That” reunion! 

It’s been more than 20 years since the show first aired on Nickelodeon, and even after all that time, ’80s and ’90s kids still have a special place in their hearts for “All That.” Now, thanks to Nickelodeon’s “The Splat,” ’90s shows are coming back every night on TeenNick, so, in honor of that, the show’s cast, Kel Mitchell, Lori Beth Denberg, Danny Tamberelli and Josh Server, all reunited at New York Comic Con on Saturday to make our dreams come true.

Awwww here it goes! Here are 10 of the best moments:

 

1. Kel says he and Kenan have talked about bringing back “Good Burger.”

Mitchell already told The Huffington Post he and Kenan are working together again, but now we have more details. After being asked whether there would be more “All That” or “Good Burger,” Kel said he and Kenan have been talking.

 

2. Kel and the cast turned up. And made a video to prove it.

A video posted by Kel Mitchell (@iamkelmitchell) on

During the panel they talked about old sketches, their favorite characters and even how the got on the show. So, yeah, they turned up.

 

3. We finally know what happened to the Big Ear of Corn.

The big ear of corn was a key cast member on “All That,” perhaps the most important one of all. And now we know Danny takes care of its corn babies.

 

4. About 10 minutes in, Kel says he still loves orange soda.

Josh Server is surprised it took this long to happen.

 

5. Ed (Kel) finally shared the secret of the Good Burger sauce to Lester Oaks Construction Worker (Kenan).

Kenan was at “SNL” but Kel still shared this video of the two discussing the secret sauce.

 

6. Lori Beth Denberg gave us some vital information.

Watch out for that warm apple juice, people.

 

7. The cast says their favorite guest stars were Chris Farley, Aaliyah, TLC, Sinbad and the Spice Girls.

No argument.

 

8. Lori Beth and Danny talked about their slime PTSD.

“You have very little traction with slime in your butt crack,” said Denberg.

 

9. The cast says Chris Farley once wrecked the set so he’d only have to do the scene once.

Josh Server says it was awesome.

 

10. Oh, and this happened:

It is the best day.

Also on HuffPost:

 

 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




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Menopause or Lunacy: …That Is the Question

Menopause or Lunacy: …That Is the Question


New – Riding the bus, at work, in the grocery store, on the beach, in the fitness club, at the coffee shop, walking, cycling–you see them everywhere. Often, they are rushing, looking frazzled, knowing they’ve forgotten something important, for which they will pay later. Quite likely, they are wearing lightweight clothing and stopping often to wipe their furrowed brows. These are women-of-a-certain-age, and they number close to 50 million in Canada and the United States alone. Reading Menopause

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Carly Rae Jepsen Just Released Her New Single, ‘All That’

Carly Rae Jepsen fans were in for a treat this weekend. The “Call Me Maybe” singer performed on “Saturday Night Live,” where she debuted her brand new single “All That.”

After performing “I Really Like You,” for which she released a music video last month featuring Tom Hanks, Jepsen premiered “All That.” The new song is produced by Blood Orange’s Dev Hynes and Ariel Rechtshaid, who also joined her onstage at Studio 8H on Saturday.

After her “SNL” performance, Jepsen tweeted the link to the official studio version on iTunes.


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Menopause or Lunacy: …That Is the Question

Menopause or Lunacy: …That Is the Question


Used – Riding the bus, at work, in the grocery store, on the beach, in the fitness club, at the coffee shop, walking, cycling–you see them everywhere. Often, they are rushing, looking frazzled, knowing they’ve forgotten something important, for which they will pay later. Quite likely, they are wearing lightweight clothing and stopping often to wipe their furrowed brows. These are women-of-a-certain-age, and they number close to 50 million in Canada and the United States alone. Reading Menopause

Price: $
Sold by Alibris UK: books, movies