Critic’s Notebook: Toxic Men Get All the Attention. But Not in These Plays.

Theater encourages empathy, yet it sometimes seems women on stage get very little of it. That’s changing.
NYT > Arts

SPECIAL TRAVEL DISCOUNTS:
Orbitz Worldwide Inc

Sponge offers hope of ‘less toxic’ chemotherapy

Scientists are testing a device that removes excess chemo drugs from the body to reduce side-effects.
BBC News – Health
HEALTH & WELLNESS UPDATE:

Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

Kylie Jenner Evokes Britney Spears’ “Toxic” in a Crystal-Encrusted Nude Look

Kylie JennerBaby, can’t you see…why Kylie Jenner is giving us serious “Toxic” vibes.
It may have been a casual Thursday night for the reality star, but to Britney Spears fans,…

E! Online (US) – Fashion Police

Special Tip Update!

Surgeons’ ‘toxic’ rows added to mortality rate, says report

A report into the cardiac unit at a London hospital said the team was consumed by a “dark force”.
BBC News – Health
HEALTH & WELLNESS UPDATE:

Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

Hot summer leading to ‘toxic’ algae

Blooms have flourished during the warm spell but they pose a health risk to humans and animals.
BBC News – Health
HEALTH & WELLNESS UPDATE:

Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

Books of The Times: Toxic History, Poisoned Water: The Story of Flint

Anna Clark’s “The Poisoned City” and Mona Hanna-Attisha’s “What the Eyes Don’t See” view the water crisis in Flint, Mich., from different angles.
NYT > Books

BOOK SALE UPDATE!

Ariana Grande speaks out over ‘toxic relationship’

The singer says women shouldn’t be shamed for their partner’s problems after her Mac Miller breakup.
BBC News – Entertainment & Arts

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:


Does The Only Way is Essex promote ‘toxic masculinity’?

Viewers and a domestic abuse charity voice concerns about some behaviour in the new series.
BBC News – Entertainment & Arts

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:


Thanks to ‘Pitch Perfect 3,’ Britney Spears’ ‘Toxic’ Is the Show Tune of the Year

It’s not often that we get two movie musicals opening in wide release in one week, and they could hardly be a greater study in contrasts. “The Greatest Showman” is an old-school tuner that brought in estimable stage-and-screen songwriters for an all-original song score that’s meant to convey the emotions of the characters and send […]

Variety

SHOPPING DISCOUNT UPDATE:

3 Toxic Mistakes That Can Tear Young Married Couples Apart

Even strong relationships are susceptible to marriage mistakes, particularly if the marriage is relatively new, according to Pastor John Gray of Lakewood Church in Houston, Texas. Pastor Gray often counsels couples and newlyweds in matters of marriage, and he says there are three particular marriage mistakes that are toxic enough to tear two people apart.

MISTAKE #1: Holding your spouse hostage to past mistakes.

People make mistakes. When your partner says or does something that offends you, it’s important not to harp on that mistake in the future. Instead, Pastor Gray says, you must give your spouse the opportunity to learn and grow. “That can mess up a young marriage because nobody knows how to do it right at the beginning,” he points out.

MISTAKE #2: Assuming married life won’t be different from dating.

What does a little piece of paper end up changing? A lot, says Pastor John. “When you engage another human being willingly with the opportunity to walk away, which is what dating is, there’s less pressure,” he explains. “When you get married, now you’re saying, ‘I’m building with this person.’ … There will be tension.”

MISTAKE #3: Telling your business to your parents.

Pastor John calls this one of the biggest mistakes young married couples make. “Lady, if he offends you, don’t tell your mama. Because when he ends up apologizing and getting it right, and you’re healed from it, the mother still remembers it,” Pastor John says. “Keep your business to yourself.”

Pastor John’s new series, “The Book of John Gray,” premieres Saturday, April 15, at 10 p.m. ET, but you can  watch the first episode in full now on WatchOWN.tv.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Weddings – The Huffington Post
FASHION NEWS-Visit Shoe Deals Online-Fashion News today for the hottest deals online!

6 Toxic Thoughts Smart People Quarantine

2016-11-25-1480102808-5481960-6ToxicThoughtsSuccessfulPeopleQuarantineHP

Your self-talk (the thoughts you have about your feelings) can make or break you. When you make a mistake, they either magnify the negativity or help you turn that misstep into something productive.

Negative self-talk is unrealistic, unnecessary, and self-defeating. It sends you into a downward emotional spiral that is difficult to pull out of.

All self-talk is driven by important beliefs that you hold about yourself. It plays an understated but powerful role in success because it can both spur you forward to achieve your goals and hold you back.

“He who believes he can and he who believes he cannot are both correct.” -Henry Ford

TalentSmart has tested the emotional intelligence (EQ) of more than a million people and found that 90% of top performers are high in emotional intelligence. These successful, high EQ individuals possess an important skill⎯the ability to recognize and control negative self-talk so that it doesn’t prevent them from reaching their full potential.

These successful people earn an average of $ 28,000 more annually than their low EQ peers, get promoted more often, and receive higher marks on performance evaluations. The link between EQ and earnings is so direct that every point increase in EQ adds $ 1,300 to an annual salary.

When it comes to self-talk, we’ve discovered some common thoughts that hold people back more than any others. Be mindful of your tendencies to succumb to these thoughts, so that they don’t derail your career:

1. Perfection equals success. Human beings, by our very nature, are fallible. When perfection is your goal, you’re always left with a nagging sense of failure, and end up spending your time lamenting what you failed to accomplish, instead of enjoying what you were able to achieve.

2. My destiny is predetermined. Far too many people succumb to the highly irrational idea that they are destined to succeed or fail. Make no mistake about it, your destiny is in your own hands, and blaming multiple successes or failures on forces beyond your control is nothing more than a cop out. Sometimes life will deal you difficult cards to play, and others times you’ll be holding aces. Your willingness to give your all in playing any hand you’re holding determines your ultimate success or failure in life.

3. I “always” or “never” do that. There isn’t anything in life that you always or never do. You may do something a lot or not do something enough, but framing your behavior in terms of “always” or “never” is a form of self-pity. It makes you believe that you have no control of yourself and will never change. Don’t succumb to it.

4. I succeed when others approve of me. Regardless of what people think of you at any particular moment, one thing is certain⎯you’re never as good or bad as they say you are. It’s impossible to turn off your reactions to what others think of you, but you can take people’s opinions with a grain of salt. That way, no matter what people think about you, your self-worth comes only from within.

5. My past equals my future. Repeated failures can erode your self-confidence and make it hard to believe you’ll achieve a better outcome in the future. Most of the time, these failures result from taking risks and trying to achieve something that isn’t easy. Just remember that success lies in your ability to rise in the face of failure. Anything worth achieving is going to require you to take some risks, and you can’t allow failure to stop you from believing in your ability to succeed.

6. My emotions equal my reality. If you’ve read Emotional Intelligence 2.0, you know how to take an objective look at your feelings and separate fact from fiction. If not, you might want to read it. Otherwise, your emotions will continue to skew your sense of reality, making you vulnerable to the negative self-talk that can hold you back from achieving your full potential.

Bringing It All Together

I hope these lessons are as useful to you as they have been to me over the years. As I write them, I’m reminded of their power and my desire to use them every day.

What other toxic thoughts do successful people quarantine? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below, as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
Special News Bulletin-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

Ending Toxic Relationships

2015-09-23-1442967068-3152713-ScreenShot20150922at5.06.02PM.png

Ladies and Gentlemen, let me decree: The age where you stop putting up with people’s bullshit is 36. It may come well before then, but I know for sure the beaten, bloody corpse of giving-a-damn breathes its last miserable breath on your 36th day of birth.

Too dramatic? You’re right. I’m an artist. I get emotional sometimes. Let me try this again.

This year on my 36th birthday, I received a phone call from someone purporting to wish me well; but I was instead met with an out-of-nowhere onslaught of anger, bitterness and passive-aggressive insults. I tried desperately to save the conversation, to walk away from the call with some sense of positivity, but the wounds were too deep and the history between us too complicated.

Which is when I came to a necessary but painful realization: the relationship needed to end immediately. I wished the person well and hung up the phone. I will probably never speak to them again.

Put very simply, if a relationship (whether it be a friend, a family member or a significant other) makes you feel bad, you shouldn’t be in it.

That’s not to say that relationships aren’t complex and multifaceted, and not every interaction will be sunshine and rainbows. It’s simply to say that too often we tend not to take care of ourselves for the sake of a friendship. Too often we feel like it’s our price of admission, that in order to get the few moments of good, we have to put up with the long hours of bad. But I’ve come to realize that this way of thinking ultimately is a disservice to both sides.

Many toxic relationships have a destructive push/pull dynamic. Call it a form of co-dependency. One person needs to feel like the caring one, the other needs to feel like the destructive one, and both sides are miserable. It’s human nature, but it’s ultimately an unhealthy cycle because it creates a relationship without stability.

It used to be that I’d try to approach every toxic relationship as a puzzle that hadn’t yet been solved. It was a game I played with myself on the road to trying to be a good person; maybe if I look at the relationship in ANOTHER way it will change, maybe I’m not being patient enough, maybe I need to choose my words more carefully. Maybe, maybe, maybe.

But that’s when I discovered that I was, myself, contributing to the push/pull dynamic. My previous thinking always assumed the other person was the destructive one; but in reality I was being equally destructive. In my subconscious effort to not feel bad while being in a relationship, I did the unfair thing of pulling them closer while simultaneously pushing them away.

In a toxic relationship, each party continues to inflict their own negative behaviors upon the other person, which ultimately makes both people feel worse. There are indeed one-sided toxic relationships, where one party exclusively subjects the other to their bad behavior, but the mere fact that the “innocent” side keeps the cycle going means there is some equal amount of responsibility for its toxicity.

In short — we do it to each other.

And that is the single most important thing to understand when you break off a toxic relationship. Ending it doesn’t mean the other person is “bad” and you shouldn’t look to assign blame. There are no winners, and there are no losers. Sometimes, two people just aren’t good for each other. It’s as simple as that.

Ending something so familiar can be tricky. Sometimes its a matter of ripping the band-aid off, sometimes its a matter of quietly slipping away. No matter the method, remember to be kind to yourself and to the other person. Be sure to leave open the idea that there may come a time where your paths could cross again under happier circumstances. Allow them to go off and find what makes them happy just as you need to find what makes you happy.

When it comes down to brass tacks, every relationship that you have in life should make you a better person, just as you should contribute positively in return. We somehow tend to forget that along the way, when, in fact, our personal fulfillment should never be up for negotiation.

Episode 3 of my web series Keith Broke His Leg is a humorous take on toxic relationships; and shows a rather… unsanitary… way of ending the cycle. Take a look:

Keith Powell is an actor, writer, and director. He is most known for his role as Toofer on 30 Rock. He has had recurring roles on About A Boy and The Newsroom, and created, wrote, and directed the original web series Keith Broke His Leg (www.GetBroken.com).

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
Special News Bulletin-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

Ending Toxic Relationships

2015-09-23-1442967068-3152713-ScreenShot20150922at5.06.02PM.png

Ladies and Gentlemen, let me decree: The age where you stop putting up with people’s bullshit is 36. It may come well before then, but I know for sure the beaten, bloody corpse of giving-a-damn breathes its last miserable breath on your 36th day of birth.

Too dramatic? You’re right. I’m an artist. I get emotional sometimes. Let me try this again.

This year on my 36th birthday, I received a phone call from someone purporting to wish me well; but I was instead met with an out-of-nowhere onslaught of anger, bitterness and passive-aggressive insults. I tried desperately to save the conversation, to walk away from the call with some sense of positivity, but the wounds were too deep and the history between us too complicated.

Which is when I came to a necessary but painful realization: the relationship needed to end immediately. I wished the person well and hung up the phone. I will probably never speak to them again.

Put very simply, if a relationship (whether it be a friend, a family member or a significant other) makes you feel bad, you shouldn’t be in it.

That’s not to say that relationships aren’t complex and multifaceted, and not every interaction will be sunshine and rainbows. It’s simply to say that too often we tend not to take care of ourselves for the sake of a friendship. Too often we feel like it’s our price of admission, that in order to get the few moments of good, we have to put up with the long hours of bad. But I’ve come to realize that this way of thinking ultimately is a disservice to both sides.

Many toxic relationships have a destructive push/pull dynamic. Call it a form of co-dependency. One person needs to feel like the caring one, the other needs to feel like the destructive one, and both sides are miserable. It’s human nature, but it’s ultimately an unhealthy cycle because it creates a relationship without stability.

It used to be that I’d try to approach every toxic relationship as a puzzle that hadn’t yet been solved. It was a game I played with myself on the road to trying to be a good person; maybe if I look at the relationship in ANOTHER way it will change, maybe I’m not being patient enough, maybe I need to choose my words more carefully. Maybe, maybe, maybe.

But that’s when I discovered that I was, myself, contributing to the push/pull dynamic. My previous thinking always assumed the other person was the destructive one; but in reality I was being equally destructive. In my subconscious effort to not feel bad while being in a relationship, I did the unfair thing of pulling them closer while simultaneously pushing them away.

In a toxic relationship, each party continues to inflict their own negative behaviors upon the other person, which ultimately makes both people feel worse. There are indeed one-sided toxic relationships, where one party exclusively subjects the other to their bad behavior, but the mere fact that the “innocent” side keeps the cycle going means there is some equal amount of responsibility for its toxicity.

In short — we do it to each other.

And that is the single most important thing to understand when you break off a toxic relationship. Ending it doesn’t mean the other person is “bad” and you shouldn’t look to assign blame. There are no winners, and there are no losers. Sometimes, two people just aren’t good for each other. It’s as simple as that.

Ending something so familiar can be tricky. Sometimes its a matter of ripping the band-aid off, sometimes its a matter of quietly slipping away. No matter the method, remember to be kind to yourself and to the other person. Be sure to leave open the idea that there may come a time where your paths could cross again under happier circumstances. Allow them to go off and find what makes them happy just as you need to find what makes you happy.

When it comes down to brass tacks, every relationship that you have in life should make you a better person, just as you should contribute positively in return. We somehow tend to forget that along the way, when, in fact, our personal fulfillment should never be up for negotiation.

Episode 3 of my web series Keith Broke His Leg is a humorous take on toxic relationships; and shows a rather… unsanitary… way of ending the cycle. Take a look:

Keith Powell is an actor, writer, and director. He is most known for his role as Toofer on 30 Rock. He has had recurring roles on About A Boy and The Newsroom, and created, wrote, and directed the original web series Keith Broke His Leg (www.GetBroken.com).

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Visit Gabby Love today for the hottest fashion entertainment online!
Ashley Madison - Have an affair. Married Dating, Affairs, Married Women, Extramarital Affair

The Toxic Sandbox

The Toxic Sandbox


From pesticides to PCBs-what’s a threat, what’s not, and what to do about it.Mercury. Lead. Pesticides. Plastics. Air pollution. PCBs. How can parents sort through the hype, propaganda, and misinformation-and find out what is and isn’t a threat to children’s health? Investigative journalist, advocate, and concerned parent Libby McDonald separates the facts from the alarmist myths. Based on the latest research along with interviews with top medical, toxicological, and environmental experts, The Toxic Sandbox covers a wide range of essential concerns, including: – How can kids be protected from mercury poisoning? – What are the sources of lead poisoning, and how can they be avoided? – What pesticides are children ingesting, and does eating organic keep them safe? – Which teenage beauty products contain carcinogenic phthalates? – What are PCBs and PBDEs and why are they found in breast milk? – What can be done to stop the childhood asthma epidemic? Delivering reliable, up-to-date information, this indispensable resource will empower parents to protect their kids-and raise awareness for the greater good.
List Price:
Price:

The Toxic Sandbox: The Truth About Environmental Toxins And Our Children's Health

The Toxic Sandbox: The Truth About Environmental Toxins And Our Children's Health


From pesticides to PCBs-what''s a threat, what''s not, and what to do about it. Mercury. Lead. Pesticides. Plastics. Air pollution. PCBs. How can parents sort through the hype, propaganda, and misinformation-and find out what is and isn''t a threat to children''s health? Investigative journalist, advocate, and concerned parent Libby McDonald separates the facts from the alarmist myths. Based on the latest research along with interviews with top medical, toxicological, and environmental experts, The Toxic Sandbox covers a wide range of essential concerns, including:- How can kids be protected from mercury poisoning? – What are the sources of lead poisoning, and how can they be avoided? – What pesticides are children ingesting, and does eating organic keep them safe? – Which teenage beauty products contain carcinogenic phthalates? – What are PCBs and PBDEs and why are they found in breast milk? – What can be done to stop the childhood asthma epidemic?Delivering reliable, up-to-date information, this indispensable resource will empower parents to protect their kids-and raise awareness for the greater good.
List Price:
Price:

The Toxic Sandbox: The Truth about Environmental Toxins and Our Children’s Health

The Toxic Sandbox: The Truth about Environmental Toxins and Our Children’s Health


From pesticides to PCBs-what’s a threat, what’s not, and what to do about it. Mercury. Lead. Pesticides. Plastics. Air pollution. PCBs. How can parents sort through the hype, propaganda, and misinformation-and find out what is and isn’t a threat to children’s health? Investigative journalist, advocate, and concerned parent Libby McDonald separates the facts from the alarmist myths. Based on the latest research along with interviews with top medical, toxicological, and environmental experts, "The Toxic Sandbox" covers a wide range of essential concerns, including: – How can kids be protected from mercury poisoning? – What are the sources of lead poisoning, and how can they be avoided? – What pesticides are children ingesting, and does eating organic keep them safe? – Which teenage beauty products contain carcinogenic phthalates? – What are PCBs and PBDEs and why are they found in breast milk? – What can be done to stop the childhood asthma epidemic? Delivering reliable, up-to-date information, this indispensable resource will empower parents to protect their kids-and raise awareness for the greater good.
List Price:
Price:

Toxic Beauty

Toxic Beauty


Every year we each absorb an estimated 2 kilograms of chemicals through beauty and cosmetic products. Chemicals found in lipsticks, skin lotions and hair dyes have been linked with tumours, cell mutation, allergies, reproductive complications, endocrine disruption and cancer. Isn’t it time we all paid more attention to exactly what goes into the eye shadows, body washes and deodorants we love to use? This compelling and timely book tells you the key chemicals you should avoid, reveals just how natural ‘organic’ beauty products really are, and features a directory highlighting the health issues surrounding a wide range of products, from hair gel to sunscreens.
List Price:
Price:

‘American Idol’ Contestant Jax Wows Judges With Sultry Version Of Britney Spears’ ‘Toxic’

Hopeful “American Idol” contestants headed to Hollywood this week for the second round of auditions, and one young singer already sticks out from the rest.

Eighteen-year-old Jax made it to Hollywood Week with her soulful version of The Beatles’ “I Want to Hold Your Hand.” This week, she added her sultry vocals to Britney Spears’ “Toxic” turning the pop song into a smooth serenade.

Move over, Brit.

H/T RyanSeacrest.com

Follow HuffPost Teen on Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr | Pheed |

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Love Junkies: 7 Steps for Breaking the Toxic Relationship Cycle

Love Junkies: 7 Steps for Breaking the Toxic Relationship Cycle


A “Hand Up” for Women Stuck in the Toxic Love Rut Do romantic relationships leave you miserable and confused? Are you tired of getting into a relationship and as soon as the initial buzz is gone you get that sinking feeling that whispers, what am I doing? Did the new wear off as soon as the wedding bells rang? Experts say that we gravitate toward relationships within a ten-point spread of our own IQ. Likewise, in the realm of soul-health, we also attract those with whom we are most emotionally compatible. That can be a good thing, or a bad thing – it depends on how much baggage we carry around What if there was a way to diagnose your soul-health and create a plan for improvement so you could enjoy more satisfying romantic relationships? Complete with an online Soul-Health Profile that will help you assess your own soul-health and identify areas of weaknesses, Love Junkies is just that – an action plan and detailed guide to help you eliminate toxic behaviors that jeopardize your soul health and keep you stuck in unhealthy relationships. You’ll learn how to change your habits and heal your soul and most importantly, break the toxic relationship cycle FOREWORD: By Shannon Ethridge, bestselling author of the “Every Woman’s Battle” books with Steve Arterburn, and “The Sexually Confident Woman.”

Price: $
Sold by Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC