Kristin Cavallari Is Almost Brought to Tears After an Uncommon James Pricing Glitch on Very Cavallari

Kristin Cavallari, Jay Cutler, Very Cavallari_108Someone seriously screwed up at Uncommon James!
On Sunday’s all-new episode of Very Cavallari, Kristin Cavallari comes to the awful realization that there is a pricing glitch on her…

E! Online (US) – Fashion Police

Special Tip Update!

Kristin Cavallari Is Almost Brought to Tears After an Uncommon James Pricing Glitch on Very Cavallari

Kristin Cavallari, Jay Cutler, Very Cavallari_108Someone seriously screwed up at Uncommon James!
On Sunday’s all-new episode of Very Cavallari, Kristin Cavallari comes to the awful realization that there is a pricing glitch on her…

E! Online (US) – Top Stories

Special Entertainment News Bulletin:


Check Groupon First

Kristin Cavallari's Uncommon James Launch Party Hits a Snag

Brittainy Taylor delivers bad news to Kristin on the Nashville store's big day! Find out what goes wrong on "Very Cavallari"!
E! Online Videos

SHOPPING TIP UPDATE!

Jay Cutler Tells Kristin Cavallari to “Fire” Some of Her Unruly Uncommon James Employees on Very Cavallari

Kristin Cavallari, Jay Cutler, Very Cavallari 104Uncommon James is gearing up to open its doors, but as the big day approaches, drama within the store is showing no signs of slowing down.
In this clip from Sunday’s all-new Very…

E! Online (US) – Top Stories

Special Entertainment News Bulletin:


Check Groupon First

Jay Helps Kristin Move Uncommon James Out of Their Home

Kristin Cavallari's hubby reluctantly lends a helping hand during the moving process–but Jay has some questions first! Watch on "Very Cavallari."
E! Online Videos

SHOPPING TIP UPDATE!

Kristin Cavallari’s Uncommon James Team Already Has Tension on Very Cavallari: ”I Just Kind of Want Her to Stay in Her Lane”

Very Cavallari 101 Kristin Cavallari may be the face of Uncommon James, but she doesn’t run the lifestyle brand alone!
In fact, in this clip from the premiere of Very Cavallari, Kristin’s worker…

E! Online (US) – Fashion Police

Special Tip Update!

The case for ‘uncommon’ Deshaun Watson as the Texans’ starting QB

The case for ‘uncommon’ Deshaun Watson as the Texans’ starting QB
www.espn.com – NFL

Four Uncommon Ways to Clear Your Mind and Make Big Decisions

What are some tips for battling decision-fatigue? originally appeared on Quorathe knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights.

Answer by Jenny Blake, Author of PIVOT: The Only Move That Matters is Your Next One, on Quora.

Decision-fatigue refers to the phenomenon that, like willpower, our ability to make decisions throughout the day diminishes without proper recharging. When mid-Pivot and asking life’s biggest questions, we are often overwhelmed by smaller decisions and things that might not have registered on our radar in the past. Or conversely, we’re so bogged down by small day-to-day decisions that we don’t have the space to ask bigger Pivot questions about what we really want and what next steps would resonate most.

To refresh your mind, I recommend the following:

  • Don’t ask the same giant questions every day (ie: Should I quit my job?). Give yourself a period of time where you don’t have to decide at all, perhaps while you’re researching options. Revisit the decision at specific intervals of your choosing, but not on a daily monkey-mind basis.
  • Create routines for as much as you can in your life – morning routines, scheduling exercise for the same recurring days/times, evening wind down rituals. What recharges you? The more you can create routines around these things, the less you will find yourself debating what to do when throughout the day (gobbling up precious mental bandwidth).
  • Write your questions down.
  • Go with your gut! We actually do know the answer to more than we think – on decisions large and small. If you find yourself debating unproductively, ask: what does my gut say?

This question originally appeared on Quora. – the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. You can follow Quora on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

More questions:​

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
Special News Bulletin-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

3 Uncommon Ways to Maintain Your Real Focus

2015-06-05-1433514790-4550924-AlmaArtePhotography.jpgPerfectly healthy young people have been taking themselves to doctors, worried that their forgetfulness is a sign of Alzheimer’s, according to a report last month about doctors in Australia who are studying the phenomenon. But for most of us, growing forgetfulness is little more than a natural reaction to information overload.

Our brains are simply not wired to process the vast amount of information and choices we are exposed to these days–and the impossible effort to do so can lead to indecisiveness, bad decisions and stress, according to Lucy Jo Palladino, Ph.D., a psychologist and author of Find Your Focus Zone.

Information overload can also tempt us to tune out or simply slide across the surface of life — like a water strider on a pond, robbed of the pleasure of a place to land. So what genuinely helps people navigate this Information Age (which, perhaps not coincidentally, has also been called the Age of Anxiety?)

There are lots of suggestions out there in publications such as, Fast Company, Forbes and Aeon. Many discuss the dangers of email and multitasking and the value of daydreaming, taking breaks, going for walks, writing things down, and doing the most important things first. Daniel Goleman also recently wrote about the topic in Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence, in which he explores the benefits of mindfulness meditation, focused preparation and recovery, positive emotions and connections, and mental “prosthetics.”

As someone who has an insatiable desire to know and do everything, I’ve also come to find three insights particularly helpful. Rather than concrete actions, they serve more as mindsets or perspectives to take on all that is available to us now — and stay centered on what truly matters to us as individuals.

What’s new is not (necessarily) important. In a recent interview on Krista Tippett’s podcast, On Being, Maria Popova, the creator of Brain Pickings, observed that the way information comes to us today via the Internet constantly reinforces the idea that what is new is what is important and valuable. But this, of course, is not true. Much of what is delivered up as new is neither important nor valuable. To the contrary, it can be a great distraction from what is meaningful — which is often old, timeless, contained in books, in music, in art, and in the hearts and souls of human beings who need only the expanse of quiet, leisure, stillness, and each other to bring their wisdom to life. Put another way: It helps to remember that trying to keep up with what is new is not necessarily what’s most likely to make you happy, healthy, or successful.

Sensitivity to other people’s expectations can spin you in circles. Being overly influenced by other people’s expectations can make us vulnerable to being reactive instead of deliberate; and those of us who are sensitive to other people’s expectations need to figure out how to manage that. When I was growing up, for example, my father on more than one occasion became furious at me for reading a book rather than volunteering to help around the house. While he clearly did not remember what it was like to be a kid or enjoy himself, his reaction had an impact on me. And to this day, I need to remind myself to be conscious of my motivations before I act so I do not unconsciously relinquish the reins of my life to the helter-skelter whims of others.

Focusing on what makes you feel like you is the best guide there is. Like most writers, I have spent a lot of time living a dual existence: “professional” by day, and “writer” by any early or late hour I have to myself. I am fortunate that I am adept at my professional work, I enjoy it, and I find it meaningful. But when I think it is me, instead of what I do, I tend to lose my focus–and, often, lots of things start to go wrong. But when I am know that I am a writer first–because that is where I feel most fully me–I make smarter decisions, my energy flows more smoothly, and things tend to go better in my working life, my writing life, and my personal life. I can look at the information that comes my way and not feel overly reactive and spun about by distractions because I am acting from what I can only describe as the core of my being.

In short, it comes down to those familiar words: Know yourself — and then trust yourself. It is as simple and remarkable as that.

(This post appeared in an earlier version at http://lisabennett.org/blog/ Photo credit: AlmaArte Photography.)

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
Special News Bulletin-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

Remapping Performance: Common Ground, Uncommon Partners

Remapping Performance: Common Ground, Uncommon Partners


Completing a trilogy of works by Jan Cohen-Cruz, Remapping Performance focuses on the work of artists and experts who collaborate across fields to address social issues. The book explores work of a range of artists who employ artistic training, methodologies and mind-sets in their work with experts from other sectors such as medicine and healthcare and from other disciplines, to draw an expanded map of performance platforms including university/ community partnerships, neighbourhood-bases, and cultural diplomacy. Case studies include ArtSpot Productions/Mondo Bizarro’s Cry You One about climate change in southern Louisiana, incorporating theatrics and organizing; Michael Rohd/Sojourn Theatre’s social and civic practices; Anne Basting’s University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee-based integration of performance and creative aging; and the collaborative cultural diplomacy experiment, smARTpower. Short companion pieces add expertise from Helen Nicholson, Todd London, Julie Thompson Klein, Nancy Cantor, Maria Rosario Jackson, and Penny Von Eschen. Jan Cohen-Cruz ends with suggestions for fully integrating performance in cross-sector initiatives. This latest book by a leading figure in engaged/ applied theatre and performance builds on its predecessors by offering a future-oriented perspective, a vision of art and performance interacting with a range of social sectors and with an emphasis on HE in such partnerships, and will be a ‘must-read’ for all students and scholars working in this field. ”

Price: $
Sold by Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

Tony Dungy on Uncommon Marriage and Life After Coaching

On February 4, 2007, long-time NFL head coach (and current NBC Sunday Night Football analyst) Tony Dungy etched his name into the history books by becoming the first African American head coach to win a Super Bowl; his Indianapolis Colts overcoming the Chicago Bears 29-17. It was a triumph that was revered — and will continue to be revered — by many.

2014-06-04-Dungy_Tony_03.jpg

As Dungy clutched the championship trophy in the post-game celebration and highlighted his faith in a humble interview with legendary broadcaster Jim Nantz, the world watched as a man realized a dream that so few will ever be able to accomplish.

But there’s much more to the narrative on Tony Dungy than that Super Bowl victory. For one layer, I would like to take you back to June 19, 1982.

This was the day that Tony married his wife, Lauren. It was the beginning of a union that would stand the test of time. If you look back at the video of Tony’s Super Bowl speech, you’ll see that Lauren was standing right there, right by his side. That visual representation was a reminder that, even as we marvel at the prowess of today’s athletes and laud the intellect of championship coaches — family comes first.

Indeed there is a story here, a marvelous one that continues to this day, as Tony and Lauren prepare to celebrate their 32nd anniversary. It is a story that they have encapsulated in their recently released book, Uncommon Marriage: Learning about Lasting Love and Overcoming Life’s Obstacles Together.

2014-06-04-dungycovernew.jpg

Chronicling Tony and Lauren’s journey from courtship to present day, Uncommon Marriage is a book that anyone who is even considering marriage would appreciate. The Dungy’s share their experience — the thrills of life, and the disappointments as well — in a heart-felt (and sometimes playful) “he-said/she-said” pattern that is as relatable as it is inspirational.

I had a chance to catch up with Tony Dungy to get some insight on the motivation behind Uncommon Marriage, the keys to the endurance of his own marriage, and how life has been after coaching in the NFL.

Marcus: What inspired you and your wife Lauren to write Uncommon Marriage?
Dungy: Lauren and I had done several children’s books together. Tyndale Publishers approached us about doing a marriage book. At first, we were very hesitant, not thinking we would have much to share. But we were involved in a couple’s Bible study and we had a lot of conversation about marriage in that study. In the past, it always seemed we were one of the younger couples, asking for advice in our Bible studies. But suddenly, we looked around and we were one of the older couples. So we felt we might have some things to share from our experiences, from lessons we’d learned from other couples, and especially from what we had read in the Bible. We also felt that society was not holding marriage in the high esteem that it needed to be held, so we wanted to address that as well.

Marcus: What message do you hope readers — newlyweds, long-timers, even singles — get from Uncommon Marriage?

Dungy: We hope there is something in it for everyone, even singles looking to get married. The basic message that we talk about is focusing on the three C’s — Christ, commitment, and communication. We believe that to enjoy a rich and satisfying marriage you really need Christ in the center of your marriage. That way, when you find yourself taking divergent paths, you can always look to Christ and let Him bring things back into focus. We also want couples to see that God’s design for marriage is permanent. Couples must have a commitment to stay together no matter what. And the third major point is one of communication. Talking, listening, and understanding each other is crucial for a marriage.

Marcus: You have been together with your wife for more than three decades. What are some of the keys to the endurance of your marriage?

2014-06-04-DungyTonyandLauren02cropped.jpg

Dungy: Marriage is like a football game. There is a huge adrenaline rush at the opening kickoff, but that rush eventually wears off and you have to settle in to play the full four quarters. You are going to have to stick to your game plan, rely on your fundamentals, and be ready for some ups and downs to succeed over the long haul. In marriage, that means continuing to look out for the best interests of the other person, keeping the lines of communication open and not letting external elements and pressures distract you from your commitment to each other. And those external elements don’t have to be bad things. They can be positive things like children, or job promotions. We just have to be careful that nothing comes between our relationship with our spouse because that is the most important personal relationship that God has ordained. And when circumstances arise that put pressure on the marriage relationship, we have to remember to turn to God in those times and not run away from Him. Probably the best advice we could give, though, is to remember that your relationship can’t be based on your feelings. Love is not a feeling, it’s a commitment to the other person. There will be times you don’t feel like loving your spouse, but those are the times you have to let Christ help you honor that commitment.

Marcus: Were there things you learned from marriage that influenced your coaching on the football field, and vice versa?
Dungy: The job of a coaching staff is to help your team play its best. You have to put aside your individual goals and objectives to make that happen. In a marriage, both individuals have to do the same thing — put aside their individual desires and concentrate on making the marriage and the family the best they can be. Goal setting, teamwork, and sacrifice become the major themes, so in many ways I did take things from my coaching to our marriage. The one thing I knew as a head coach was that I couldn’t do it all myself. My assistant coaches had so much to offer and I had to empower them to utilize their talents. Married couples need to do the same thing and utilize the strengths of each spouse.

From my family, I learned that each child was a little different in their emotional makeup. I couldn’t treat them exactly the same, and that helped me as a coach. Realizing that people all respond differently to instruction, correction, encouragement and criticism was so helpful to me. As a coach, I never subscribed to the “my way or the highway” thinking. Because of my experiences with our children, I tried to find different ways to communicate with, and get the most out of, my players.

Marcus: You have made a tremendous transition from coaching. What do you feel has been your greatest accomplishment (or accomplishments) since retiring from the field?
Dungy: Since retiring from coaching I’ve had time to do many of the things I’ve always wanted to do. I’ve gotten to spend a lot more time with my wife and my family. Helping Lauren more in raising the younger children has probably been the most meaningful thing I’ve been able to do. I’ve also been able to get more involved in church and take a bigger role there. I love my job with NBC Sunday Night Football, and being a part of the number 1 rated show on prime-time TV has been a thrill. It has also allowed me to highlight some of the great off-the-field projects of our NFL players. As part of our Dungy Family Foundation, Lauren and I, along with our relatives, have been able to support some very worthwhile causes. We’ve been able to help out with some children’s programs, women’s shelters and academic support for students. Lauren and I read and promote literacy during the school year in Tampa elementary schools, and that has been rewarding and fun.

Marcus: What advice would you give to someone that wants to have the type of positive influence you have been able to have?

Dungy: The best work-related advice I ever received was from Chuck Noll, my first boss with the Pittsburgh Steelers. He told me to never make a career decision based on salary or job title. Instead, look at who you’re going to work for and work with, what you can learn from them, and how you can grow in the job. That advice served me well over the years and I would add one thing to that. I always tell people to look for significance over success. There are many things in life you can do to make money, and earning a living is important. But I would recommend looking at how you can help people as well as make money. You will definitely feel more energized and more fulfilled doing something you feel is benefiting others.

Marcus: What’s next for you?

Dungy: I don’t have anything concrete planned for the future. Lauren and I have been asked about doing another book but we don’t have one in the works yet. I’m leading a couple of Bible studies during the week and I’d like to get more involved with discipling young men, especially. However, I don’t see a return to full time coaching on the horizon. We still have six children at home so we have more than enough to keep us busy.

***
Photos provided by Tyndale House Publishers. Used with Permission.
Weddings – The Huffington Post
FASHION NEWS-Visit Shoe Deals Online-Fashion News today for the hottest deals online!