Meghan McCain Shares Touching Tribute to Late Father: ‘All That I Am Is Thanks to Him’

Following Sen. John McCain’s death at age 81 on Saturday after a battle with stage-four brain cancer, the late political maverick and war hero’s daughter Meghan McCain shared a touching tribute on social media.

In a message she captioned “I love you forever – my beloved father @SenJohnMcCain,” Meghan, 33, revealed that she was by her father’s side as he “departed this life today.”

“In the thirty-three years we shared together, he raised me, taught me, corrected me, comforted me, encouraged me, and supported me in all things,” she wrote. “He taught me how to live. His love and his care, ever present, always unfailing, took me from a girl to a woman — and he showed me what it is to be a man.”

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

When planning her wedding to Ben Domenech last fall, Meghan pushed the date forward in the wake of her father’s cancer diagnosis. Despite his tenuous health, the ailing senator was on hand for his daughter’s big day.

RELATED VIDEO: Sen. John McCain, Maverick Politician and Decorated War Veteran, Dies at 81

“All that I am is thanks to him,” she continued in her tribute. “Now that he is gone, the task of my lifetime is to live up to his example, his expectations, and his love. My father’s passing comes with sorrow and grief for me, for my mother, for my brothers, and for my sisters. He was a great fire who burned bright, and we lived in his light and warmth for so very long. We know that his flame lives on, in each of us. The days and years to come will not be the same without my dad — but they will be good days, filled with life and love, because of the example he lived for us.”

RELATED: John McCain Dead at 81: Obama, Biden, Trump and More Pay Their Respects to the War Hero Senator

Cindy McCain, the Senator’s wife of 38 years, also mourned the loss on social media.

“My heart is broken,” tweeted Cindy, 64, minutes after her family announced his death.

“I am so lucky to have lived the adventure of loving this incredible man for 38 years,” she continued. “He passed the way he lived, on his own terms, surrounded by the people he loved, in the place he loved best.”

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Sen. McCain, the former POW and outspoken Republican politician nicknamed The Maverick for being unafraid to disagree with fellow members of his party, died at 4:28 p.m. on Saturday, his family announced in a statement, according to NBC News.

McCain is survived by wife Cindy, and his children: Douglas, Andrew, and Sidney (all with first wife Carol McCain) and Meghan, Jack, James, and Bridget, with Cindy.

On Friday, his family said that Sen. McCain, “with his usual strength of will,” decided to stop treatment for the stage-four brain cancer he had been battling since its diagnosis last summer.

“In the year since,” the McCain family said, “John has surpassed expectations for his survival. But the progress of disease and the inexorable advance of age render their verdict.”


PEOPLE.com

Fashion Deals Update:

Mom of Pregnant Gunshot Victim Who Stayed on Life Support for Weeks to Deliver Baby Says, ‘She Held on For Him’

The mother of a slain pregnant woman who stayed on life support for weeks after being shot so she could have her baby considers the child as a “blessing” even as she mourns her daughter’s loss.

Ohio mom Lindzie Wilson, 25, was shot on March 1 but stayed on life support through April 21, when doctors delivered her baby boy, Bailee. Lindzie, a mom of two other young boys, was subsequently taken off life support and died on April 24, authorities have said.

The fatal shooting, which took place outside of Lindzie’s Springfield home, is still unsolved.

Her mom, LeighAnne Roberts, tells PEOPLE she’s proud her daughter “fought hard for Bailee. She held on for him. She held on as long as she possibly could.”

Bailee was born at 24 weeks and is currently in an incubator in the neonatal intensive care unit, Roberts says, but his long-term prognosis is good: “He’s doing as good as he can” be, says Roberts, who will raise the child.

Roberts is looking forward to Aug. 15 — Lindzie’s due date — when Bailee is taken out of the incubator and she can hold him.

“He’s definitely a blessing,” she says. “I’m sure up there watching this and is happy about how things went.”

Roberts says that doctors described Bailee’s survival as a “miracle”: One of the bullets that struck Lindzie went through her shoulder and traveled diagonally to her opposite hip, narrowly avoiding her unborn child.

• Want to keep up with the latest crime coverage? Click here to get breaking crime news, ongoing trial coverage and details of intriguing unsolved cases in the True Crime Newsletter.

“I would have loved for the miracle for to survive it,” she says. “But there was no hope from day one.”

The choice to take Lindzie of life support, she says, was really no choice at all: It had been 54 days and Lindzie’s condition hadn’t improved.

Still, she says the decision to part with her only daughter brought her “indescribable pain. That’s all I can really say.”

Lindzie was an outgoing, generous person who had been accepted into the Naval Academy before her first pregnancy, her mom says. She loved country music and outdoor activities like dirt biking.

Most of all, she loved her children: She was a “hands-on” mom to her two sons Brendan, 8, and Bentley, 5, who are now being cared for by their father.

“She loved her kids deeply,” Roberts says, adding, “Her smile made you smile.”

Lindzie, says Roberts, had “the most gorgeous blue eyes” as well as blond hair — the latter a trait she shares with little Bailee.

The pain of her death is compounded by the fact that it’s still unsolved, says Roberts.

Police have not named a suspect in the attack, and in a recent press conference, Springfield Police Chief Lee Graf called on the public’s help in the investigation.

Graf declined to say whether police think Wilson knew her attacker.

The thought that Lindzie’s attacker is still at large is “very discouraging,” says Roberts.

Referencing Lindzie’s sons, Roberts says, “I want justice for them. All three of them have to grow up without their mom.”

Anyone with information on the shooting should call 937-324-7685 or 937-324-7716, police have said.


PEOPLE.com

Fashion Deals Update:

‘I’m Obsessed with Him’: Nicki Minaj Goes on ‘Aunty’ Duties Backstage with DJ Khaled’s Son Asahd

Major key alert: Nicki Minaj and DJ Khaled‘s 9-month-0ld son Asahd spent some quality time together Friday night.

The tiny tot has been knocking back milestone after milestone in his short life so far — turning heads on red carpets, stealing the spotlight at award showshanging with A-list stars, flying on private jets, running up the talk show circuit, producing music, and gracing magazine and album covers along the way.

And now, he can check “delivering platinum plaques” off his list.

Asahd swung by to see Minaj on Friday night to deliver her a framed record symbolizing the success of “Do You Mind,” the hit Khaled track she guests on. And while there, he couldn’t help but pose with Minaj for some sweet snaps.

Of course, Minaj was thrilled to see her favorite (non-blood related) nephew. “Look @ aunty’s big boy!!!!!” the 34-year-old “Anaconda” rapper gushed on Instagram, captioning a shot of them together on her couch. “This little angel came bearing gifts. PLATINUM PLAQUE ALERT!!!!! #DoYouMind Thank You for all your hard work Asahd!!!!! @asahdkhaled @djkhaled love you!!!!!”

She also made a video with Asahd using a bunny filter and voice changed, thanking the sweet boy for giving her the gift as he sat on her lap.

“This made my night,” Minaj wrote in the caption. “I’m so obsessed with him. Cuteness overload, I can’t take it!!!”

Of course, followers of Minaj know this isn’t the first time the star has praised Asahd on social media. She was one of the first stars to meet Khaled’s son, just weeks after his birth.

“My son ASAHD KHALED !! Wit @nickiminaj !!!!!” Khaled, 41, wrote on Instagram after sharing a photo of the two. “ICONS HANG WIT ICONS ! ICON ALERT!”

Want all the latest pregnancy and birth announcements, plus celebrity mom blogs? Click here to get those and more in the PEOPLE Babies newsletter.

Minaj also talked about how much she loved seeing Ashad on Twitter, writing “I told Khaled whenever I see this lil King/CEO on my timeline I light up. He just makes me so happy yo. I wanna eat his cute face & chin!”

The love appears to be mutual, as Ashad (or rather, one of Ashad’s parents) shared a photo on Minaj on his Instagram account Friday night. “Had to stop by the studio to give @nickiminaj some beats and this platinum plaque of daddy’s @djkhaled,” Ashad “wrote.” “I’m having a busy Friday night.”

RELATED VIDEO: Inside Sean ‘Puff Daddy’ Combs’ Life At Home with Six Kids: ‘I’m the Luckiest Man in the World’

Khalad and his longtime partner, Nicole Tuck, welcomed their son in October 2016. He documented the entire process on his favorite app, Snapchat.

One month into being a father, Khaled told PEOPLE he was finding parenthood easy so far. “There’s nothing hard about it. Every moment I get a chance to be with my son is such an amazing moment,” he said. “This is something that you’re supposed to be grateful for and embrace.”

“He’s just like me. He has great energy,” Khaled continued. “He’s got the glow of a young mogul — the glow of a young icon. He’s amazing.”

Fatherhood has proved to be the “biggest blessing I’ve ever had in my life,” Khaled said. “My son is so much joy. He brings me so much joy, and it’s a feeling that I can’t explain.”


PEOPLE.com

Fashion Deals Update:

Mariah Carey Feels ”Bad” After James Packer Abruptly Leaves Her Tour on Mariah’s World: ”I Wish I Had More Time to Give Him”

Mariah Carey, James Packer, Mariah's World, Mariah's World 102Mariah Carey is feeling the stress of her relationship.
On this Sunday’s Mariah’s World, Mimi opens up about James Packer during a candid conversation with her manager,…

E! Online (US) – Top Stories

Special Entertainment News Bulletin:


Check Groupon First

He Asked 1500+ Elders For Advice On Living And Loving. Here’s What They Told Him.

Karl Pillemer has spent the last several years systematically interviewing hundreds of older Americans to collect their lessons for living.

Pillemer admits he’s an advice junkie. He’s also a Ph.D. gerontologist at Cornell University.

Some years ago, after turning 50, he wondered whether there is something about getting older that teaches you how to live better. “Could we look at the oldest Americans as experts on how to live our lives?” he asked. “And could we tap that wisdom to help us make the most of our lifetimes?”

His first book, “30 Lessons for Living,” synthesized advice from over 1,000 elders on topics like happiness, work, and health.

Now Pillemer has followed up with “30 Lessons for Loving,” which features practical wisdom from over 700 older Americans with 25,000 collective years of marriage experience. One couple he profiles was married for 76 years. Another interviewee describes divorcing her husband, then remarrying him 64 years later.

I spoke with Pillemer for Sophia, a HuffPost project to collect life lessons from accomplished people that was partly inspired by his work.

Pillemer shared seven key pieces of advice he’s heard repeatedly from older Americans — about their greatest regrets, finding fulfillment, and keeping relationships healthy through life’s ups-and-downs.

1. Stop worrying so much.

I asked these oldest Americans what they think people tend to regret at their age, and what they would advise younger people to do to avoid regrets.

I expected big-ticket items — an affair or a shady business deal, something along those lines. I really didn’t expect to hear the one answer that was among the most frequent and certainly among the most passionate and vehement: stop worrying so much.

One of the biggest regrets of the very old was, I wish I hadn’t spent so much time worrying. They weren’t talking about planning, but the kind of mindless rumination that all of us do over things we have no control.

One of the people who said that summed it up this way. It was a woman who said, “I knew there were going to be layoffs at my job. I did nothing over the coming three months except worry about being laid off. I poisoned my life. I didn’t think about anything else, even though I had no control over it.” And she paused and said, “I wish I had those three months back, because that was just lifetime lost.”

sophia project

I’m sort of a chronic Woody Allen-esque worrier. Hearing hundreds and hundreds of older people saying that when you get to our age, you’ll see time spent needlessly worrying as time wasted, it really had a profound effect on me.

People have asked me, “What do you do with that insight? How do we stop worrying?” For me, when I start to get into the mindless rumination, I will remind myself that it’s an almost absolute certainty that everybody, when they get to the end of life, will say to themselves, “I wish I hadn’t spent so much time worrying about something that wasn’t going to happen.” After doing this for so long, I kind of have this feeling of a thousand grandparents in a room yelling at me [laughs].

A related insight of older people comes through very strongly in their advice about marriage. Very often a lot of their advice revolves around lightening up. We allow things, like marriage or other domains of life, to become extremely grim.

Their viewpoint from later on — this may sound like a cliché, but they mean it — is most of the things they worried about didn’t happen, and the bad things that happened to them were things they hadn’t considered.

sophia project

2. In relationships, sweat the small stuff.

If I learned one thing about how to keep the spark alive over many decades, there’s a point that the elders make that aligns very closely with research. It is an emphasis on thinking small — the small, minute-to-minute, day-to-day interactions that make up a relationship.

We tend to think of relationships globally. But all relationships are made up of hundreds or thousands of daily micro-interactions where you have the opportunity to be positive and supportive to your partner, or to be dismissive and uninterested.

There’s been research showing, for example, that how you respond if your partner interrupts you while you’re doing something is very diagnostic of how good the relationship’s going to be. If you’re actively involved in reading the paper or doing something, and your partner wants to show you something of interest to him or her, whether you respond dismissively or you briefly stop what you’re doing and engage with your partner is very diagnostic of positivity in the relationship.

sophia project

Other research has shown that it takes around 10 positive interactions to make up for one nasty one, so the ratio of positive to negative small interactions in a relationship is really critical. And that’s exactly what older people say. Many of their lessons embody this same concept.

For example, one of the things that older people argue is that we ought to be polite in our relationships. You know, the old things that people learned in elementary school, to say please and thank you and observe normal civility, is something people forget to do all the time in their relationships, mostly because we feel comfortable.

They argue using politeness and tact, but also making a habit of positive things, of compliments, of small surprises, of doing a partner’s chore, if you have a fairly rigid division of labor. Many people described that. I had more than one woman — perhaps it’s quote from someone else — but they jokingly said that their husband doing the dishes was the best aphrodisiac they could think of. So I would say that for a good relationship that lasts a long time, one of the absolute keys is attending to being positive, cheerful, supportive in the small aspects of the relationship.

sophia project

Another thing which is closely related: many couples begin to develop divergent interests and one partner then becomes hostile to a passionate interest. I had many older people say, “Our relationship changed when I gave my partner’s interests a chance and embraced them.”

One guy in his mid-80s, he was astonished. He said, “I started going to opera and ballet. Me! Opera and ballet! But it was worth it to engage with my partner.” Or wives who took up golf or developed an interest in football. At some point, people begin to say that positivity in the relationship is more important than fighting over these kinds of like minor differences.

People who have very positive relationships consciously tend to maximize these small positive interactions. And that is a place where elder wisdom completely or very closely aligns with what we know from research about good marriages.

3. Don’t sacrifice your relationship for your children.

There’s a very strong research finding in family social science. It is called the U-shaped curve of marital happiness. Basically, marriages start out pretty happy. Marital happiness drops precipitously at the birth of the first child and usually never completely recovers until the last child has left the house.

So even though kids are great — they satisfy our existential longings, and we love them, and it’s one of the most profound experiences — they are stressful for marriages. You probably don’t need a social scientist to tell you that, because anybody who’s been through it knows that.

There’s no question that a lot of marital arguments and difficulties revolve around children. It’s one of the paradoxes of marriage that good things, like having kids or having a really good job, even owning and taking care of a house, also can be sources of marital stress. It’s the double-edged sword of marriage.

The elders had one really strong recommendation in terms of adjusting to kids. Put your marriage first, put your relationship first, and don’t let kids distract you from having a good relationship with your partner.

Couples lose themselves in the mix of kids and work and fundamentally abandon attention to their relationship. The advice of the oldest Americans is very similar to that famous instruction on airplanes — put your own oxygen mask on first and then put it on the kids. If you aren’t attending to your relationship, you aren’t going to be very effective as child-rearers.

It’s very unusual that people have an awful relationship and wind up being good parents. If you sacrifice your relationship for your children, you have a reasonable chance of losing both.

sophia project

Now, they aren’t saying, of course, that you don’t love your kids and that you wouldn’t hurl yourself in front of a train to save them. But they argue that a marital relationship needs constant attention in spite of the kids.

I was shocked, in focus groups I did in preparation for the book, how many young parents couldn’t even remember when they’d gone out on their own or spent much individual time together. The oldest Americans’ argument is: Carve it out. Impose on grandparents. Develop a babysitting exchange. Even if you don’t have any money.

I had people who grew up in the Depression. One couple said, “We returned our disposable soda bottles and went to McDonald’s. It was just an opportunity to be away.”

Even if it’s something as artificial as a weekly date night where you scrimp and arrange for babysitting and go off on your own, you simply must do it. If you lose yourself in this middle-aged blur of work and kids, you really won’t do your kids any good.

sophia project

4. People who share core values typically have better marriages.

One hallmark of these long and harmonious marriages — and this is a piece of advice, too, that older people explicitly give — is to marry someone a lot like you.

We have in our popular culture this vast amount of examples of where opposites attract and make for great relationships, from “Romeo and Juliet” through “The Little Mermaid” through “Pretty Woman” and on and on.

Both the elders and research say, not so much. Marrying somebody who is very similar to you — in the trade, we call it homophily. Homophilous marriages, where the partners are pretty similar across a range of domains, tend to last longer and be happier.

What seems to really make the difference are core shared values. For example, work and the importance of work, the number of children and the way children are to be raised and goals for children, how important money is, spiritual and religious values to some extent. If there’s core value similarity, that seems to really make for these longer and happier marriages.

There’s no magic bullet. But marrying someone who’s fundamentally similar to you, especially in outlook, worldview, and values, really does seem to make a difference. It makes everything else much easier.

You might ask, in our complex multicultural society, is that really a good thing to recommend? What they would say is, you can have differences. Sometimes differences do spice up a relationship. But if you have two people who are, for example, strongly committed to two different religious traditions, you’ve got to be aware that you’re going to have to work around that in your relationship. If you have other kinds of strong value differences, it’s important to be aware of those and deal with them.

sophia project

5. Communicate early, communicate often.

I’ve spent a lot of time interviewing young people. Of course, I’m speaking anecdotally. I know a lot of them as a college professor. One thing I’ve learned is that even in long dating relationships, it’s actually relatively unusual that they have a deep discussion about child-rearing values or even having children.

I think that’s a problem. I think the elders would say it’s a problem. Understanding how your values align is very important early on.

This is related, and it may seem obvious, but virtually all of the elders in long marriages say the key to their success was learning how to communicate effectively on important issues.

People who were divorced very typically attribute it to a communication breakdown. I had several couples in the study who had gotten divorced and then remarried. One couple was actually remarried almost a half century after they were first divorced and began to have a very positive relationship. Almost always that was attributed to learning how to open up, to have open and successful communication and to really talk to one another.

6. Approach marriage as a discipline.

The unspoken, unquestioned, and underlying assumption, especially of people 75 and older, was that marriage would last forever.

They viewed marriage as an unbreakable bond; they simply had to work within those parameters. That means, for example, you live through rough patches and don’t just try to get out of the relationship. You come to accommodations and acceptances of the other person. You see this unit as something that is bigger than two people and their immediate individual satisfaction.

When they got married, they were making a commitment to the concept of marriage as a worthwhile institution, rather than the partnership based on immediate satisfaction of the individuals involved.

I got from them the idea of marriage as a discipline — not a punishment kind of discipline but the way it’s used if you’re learning music or a martial art. Marriage is a lifelong path, one that you never perfect and that you continually work to get better at. You’re continually working to improve communication and overcome problems and establish more interest.

This worldview — that once you were in marriage, you were in it for good — shaped people’s day-to-day experience and view of it. It’s one of the things which those who do articulate it recommend to younger people. They say, even if the reality is that you may not stay married, you ought to have this attitude, because it will make you work harder to get through difficult times. And there are such benefits to doing that that you ought to do it.

sophia project

7. Take time to craft the story of your life.

There’s been considerable research on the importance of reminiscence, life review. Most old people would like to be able to see their lives as a meaningful whole, to be able to sum it up into a coherent narrative.

I don’t want to wax too poetic, but I have really been struck by something which the famous psychologist Erik Erikson said. At some point you realize that you’re given this one chance — he words it this way — ‘this one chance in all of eternity to enact an identity and to play it out in the real world.’

Towards the end of life, what’s really important to people is to be able to see how their life mattered, how it was meaningful, how there was a story to it that wraps up in a good way.

People who are able to create that kind of narrative, and think of their life in that way, are typically happier. They’re more generative. They’re much more serene and open to the end of life. So that is really good work for people to do. Writing about it is something that a number of my interviewees did. Often my best interviewees were people who had done some writing of memoirs.

There is a concept which some of them also did, it’s called the “ethical will,” where people will write down what they would like to leave to younger generations about their values and principles and morality, how someone should live a life.

sophia project

It’s so critical for older people to record their memories. I would go one step further. Stop me if — actually, I’m going to go ahead and say it. We’re in the midst right now in our society of a very dangerous experiment. That’s one where young people, outside of intermittent contacts in their own family, have no meaningful contact with older people in any other dimension of their lives.

Whereas old people were often much more integrated and were sought out as sources of wisdom and advice and life experience, now they really aren’t, because our society is so age-segregated.

I think that we place young people in peril without these kind of intergenerational contacts. This is something that’s so natural for the human race. It’s really only been about the last hundred years that people have gone to anyone other than the oldest person they knew for advice about something, say like marriage or child-rearing.

Even though it sounds artificial, it’s important for older people to record their own thoughts and memories, but it’s really critical for younger people to ask them for them, and not just for stories, but for guidance and practical advice for living. I’m not against professional help. I think it’s great. But sometimes people might go and ask the elders in their lives for advice on finding a meaningful career or improving a relationship first.

So I think that it’s both older people doing it themselves, nurturing these memories and reflecting on their lives, but it’s also our role as younger people to help them to do it, to express interest in it and be a part of their reminiscing and summing up their life into a meaningful story. That’s what we really risk losing now. It’s a large reason for these projects, I have to say, and why I’m writing these books.

Transcription services by Tigerfish; now offering transcripts in two-hours guaranteed. Interview has been edited and condensed.

sophia project

Sophia is a project to collect life lessons from fascinating people. Learn more or sign up to receive lessons for living directly via Facebook or our email newsletter.
Weddings – The Huffington Post
FASHION NEWS-Visit Shoe Deals Online-Fashion News today for the hottest deals online!