Conquistador Series ‘Hernan’ Snagged by Azteca TV and History Channel Latin America

In the wake of its streaming rights acquisition by Amazon Prime, epic series “Hernan” has sold to Mexican broadcaster Azteca and pan-regional pay TV network, The History Channel, which have jointly acquired the series for their respective platforms. Produced by Mexico’s Dopamine, a Salinas Group unit, and Spain’s Onza Entertainment, the eight-episode mega-series marks the […]

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Beyoncé, Jay-Z and Solange Step in an Elevator and the Rest is History: Remembering That Infamous Met Gala Moment 5 Years Later

Beyonce, Jay-Z, Solange Knowles, 2014 Met Gala After Party“Of course sometimes s–t go down when it’s a billion dollars on an elevator.”
It sounded like the set-up to a punchline: The world’s biggest pop star, her sister, and her…

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Nintendo Switch Became the Best-Selling Nintendo Console in U.S. History During a Thanksgiving Weekend

Nintendo has high expectations for the Switch this holiday season, predicting sales totals that some viewed as overly ambitious. The company wants the system to hit 20 million units sold this fiscal year, and it helped get closer to that number with a huge Thanksgiving weekend.

Over the five-day period from Thanksgiving to Cyber Monday this year, the Nintendo Switch set a record for best-selling Nintendo console in history over that period, and it had its best week ever in the United States.

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Twin Peaks Creator David Lynch Says Trump Could Be ‘One of the Greatest Presidents in History’

David Lynch thinks Donald Trump‘s presidency has disrupted the America’s political system in a good way.

The Twin Peaks creator and director spoke to The Guardian about his political leanings, revealing that he voted for Bernie Sanders in the primary and thinks he voted Libertarian in the election. But although he didn’t support Trump, he now feels the real estate mogul’s administration could change the country for the better.

“He could go down as one of the greatest presidents in history because he has disrupted the thing so much,” Lynch said. “No one is able to counter this guy in an intelligent way.”

While Lynch says he supports an outsider changing things, he doesn’t think Trump is doing a good job himself. He just hopes his win opens the door to more options to serve as president.

“Our so-called leaders can’t take the country forward, can’t get anything done,” Lynch said. “Like children, they are. Trump has shown all this.


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Aziz Ansari Makes History at 2018 Golden Globes After Winning Best Actor in a Comedy for Master of None

Aziz Ansari, 2018 Golden Globes, Red Carpet FashionsImagine winning an award for eating all the pasta? Aziz Ansari can!
The creator and star of Netflix’s hit comedy Master of None took home the award for Best Actor in a Comedy or…

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We Look Back at the History of Star Wars Games

Welcome back to our encyclopedic series Every Ever, where we take a deep dive into the most iconic titles, characters, and series in all of gaming, and break them down with expert analysis. If you’re looking to learn more about your favorite franchises, consoles, and the history behind them, you’ve come to the right place.

In anticipation for the launch of Star Wars Battlefront II on November 17, join us in Episode 5 to see a complete timeline that covers every Star Wars video game ever.

Also, be sure to follow Every Ever on Facebook to check out all of the previous episodes, which cover ever single Mortal Kombat fighter, Mario many, many game appearances, Metal Gear’s massive cast of unique characters, and a comprehensive look at Nintendo’s history as a console maker.

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A Visual History of Hulk

For a guy who’s whole look basically boils down to “angry, muscular green guy in torn pants,” Hulk’s appearance sure has changed a lot over the years. Sometimes he’s green. Sometimes he’s gray. Sometimes he hangs out on alien planets and gets his Gladiator on. The only thing that never changes is that Hulk is the strongest ones there is.

To celebrate the character’s return to the big screen in Thor: Ragnarok, here are Hulk’s most memorable looks in the comics, films, TV series and video games.

Don’t expect Thor: Ragnarok to be Hulk’s only MCU appearance in the next few years. Actor Mark Ruffalo recently revealed that Ragnarok is the start of a three-movie arc for Hulk.

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Fall games guide 2017: Your free time is history

Fall games guide 2017: Your free time is historyHope you had a nice outdoorsy summer, because for the foreseeable future, you’re going to have a hard time leaving the living room. The fall video game season is just about underway, and the 2017 edition is keeping with tradition by slinging enough massive games your way to tax both your wallet and your eyesight. From Mario to Marvel, here’s what the next few months have in store. “Destiny 2”



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The Revolutionary History of Espadrilles

How a utilitarian peasant shoe became a symbol of rebellion.

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Sonequa Martin-Green on Her Star Trek: Discovery Role: “It’s a Dream to Be Able to Be a Part of History”

Star Trek: Discovery, Sonequa Martin-GreenStar Trek: Discovery kicked off its 2017 TCA Summer Press Tour by addressing the elephant in the room: It’s massive delays.
“We also knew that in order to justify it being on a…

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Hawaii Five-0’s Daniel Dae Kim & Grace Park Aren’t the First: A Brief History of TV Contract and Salary Disputes

TV salary disputesHawaii Five-0 made headlines with the exits of series regulars Grace Park and Daniel Dae Kim. The two Asian American stars, who had been with the show since its start, exited ahead of the upcoming…

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The Curious History of the 911 Emergency System

The nationwide roll-out of the 911 system was a difficult endeavor, and one that only made it past the finish line thanks to a charitable foundation.

Lifestyle – Esquire

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Major ISPs now say they won't sell your browsing history. Yeah. Right.

Major ISPs now say they won't sell your browsing history. Yeah. Right.Internet service providers are in an awkward spot. After getting all dressed up for the sell-your-data dance, it turns out they'll be staying home.  Or so they claim.
Reuters reports that representatives from Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T all came out today to assure worried consumers that the companies will not in fact sell customers' browsing histories to the highest bidder.  "We do not sell our broadband customers’ individual web browsing history," writes Comcast Chief Privacy Officer Gerard Lewis on the company's blog . "We did not do it before the FCC’s rules were adopted, and we have no plans to do so."   But should we trust Lewis and his counterparts at AT&T and Verizon? SEE ALSO: The software that could prevent ISPs from selling your browsing history could also just make things worse The denials were issued after the House and Senate voted to repeal landmark consumer privacy rules passed in 2016 that would have blocked internet service providers from selling the browsing history of their customers.  The public backlash has been strong — people are even donating to GoFundMes seeking to buy the browsing histories of members of Congress (although the success of those efforts is very much in doubt as no one is currently selling a "Congress's Browsing History" package deal) — and major ISPs are rushing to tell everyone that
hey hey hey, we're the good guys here. And yet.  The Electronic Frontier Foundation's Kate Tummarello points out the obvious incongruity of ISPs denying that they plan to take advantage of the new privacy landscape when those same companies lobbied so hard to bring it about.  "Those rules were a huge victory for consumers," Tummarello wrote on the EFF blog of the to-be-repealed rules. "Of course, the ISPs that stand to make money off of violating your privacy have been lobbying Congress to repeal those rules. Unfortunately, their anti-consumer push has been working." What's more, it's not like internet service providers haven't creeped hard on customers before. They most certainly have.  "Consumers have every reason to be skeptical about what the ISPs say," the EFF's Karen Gullo wrote to
Mashable, "because, as we have pointed out, they have already tried many of the practices — including hijacking your searches — that they are now allowed to do thanks to the party-line vote in Congress." Spokespersons for Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T can proclaim their devotion to your privacy all they want, but if the past is any indication you'd be right to remain skeptical. WATCH: Terrifying face gadget promises to keep your conversations private in public places



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A Visual History of Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War 3

Taglines don’t get much more bleak than the one for Warhammer 40,000: “In the grim darkness of the far future, there is only war.” In addition to spawning the term “grimdark,” that tagline does a good job of letting players know what they’re in for once they enter this endlessly violent sci-fi universe.

Many video games have been set in this fictional realm, but Relic Entertainment’s Dawn of War series is probably the most highly regarded. Ever since its 2004 debut, fans have been blasting their way through futuristic war zones, eradicating every enemy on the map. With the third installment just around the corner, let’s go back to the beginning to see how far this series has come.

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A History Of All-Girl Bands And The Rock World That Tried To Keep Them Out

It was 1964 and singer Genyusha “Goldie” Zelkowitz had a problem. The all-girl band she formed in 1962 with drummer Ginger Bianco, Goldie and the Gingerbreads, had a major label record contract and an upcoming Las Vegas stint ― but the bassist, Nancy Peterman, had just told the band that she was pregnant. She’d formed an attachment to the organist of a band they’d been performing with; things had taken their natural course. In the 1960s, birth control for unmarried women was still illegal in certain states. Roe v. Wade was not yet a glimmer in the Supreme Court’s eye, and an attempt to get her an illicit procedure fell through. The situation was unsurprising, and the conclusion was unfortunate: Peterman had to leave the band.

Zelkowitz, who now goes by Genya Ravan, practically explodes with laughter remembering the incident now, 50 years later, during a phone conversation. “She kept saying she was ‘so lonely’!” Ravan hoots. “Had I known I would have bought her a vibrator.” A vibrator and a career, or a sexual partner and parenthood: That’s a choice The Beatles likely never had to make.

For Ravan, who was determined to make it in the music business, settling down wasn’t an option. After forming Goldie and the Gingerbreads, she saw the branding benefits of keeping the lineup all women, to capitalize on the exotic appeal of an all-girl rock ’n’ roll band. But over the years, they lost members, and it was difficult to fill all the parts in the group with women.

“A lot of the girls that were canned down the line … they wanted to have a family, they wanted to have children,” said Ravan. “There’s no room for that here.”

Womanhood used to usher women off the stage in fairly obvious, biological ways. But it’s 2017. Seven years ago, Pink put in a rousing performance at the American Music Awards while expecting a baby. In February of this year, Beyoncé performed gravity-defying moves during a Grammy performance while pregnant ― with twins.

Nonetheless, pockets of the music world remain startlingly male. Our greatest pop stars today might be women, but in instrument-heavy rock ― indie, punk, metal and beyond ― the standard-issue band is still a group of three to six guys. Less common: a group of male musicians with a female vocalist, or even a female keyboardist or bassist. Least common: a band comprised primarily or entirely of female musicians.

The music internet periodically offers up listicles of all-women bands to check out, which feature a common core cast of incredible indie groups: Hinds, Ex Hex, The Prettiots, Chastity Belt, Warpaint and so on. Plenty has been written about the the chart-topping pop-rock sister group Haim, but even in a diverse musical landscape of EDM, hip-hop, pop and hybrid music, a wide variety of all-male bands still flourishes. Why is the all-female band relatively elusive?

One might be tempted to blame women as a group. Perhaps we’re biologically uninterested in playing electric guitar, much like advanced algebra and video games. Maybe there simply aren’t girls out there with the chops and dedication to succeed. But ― much as with mathematics and video games ― a closer look at the picture suggests that the problem isn’t that women are rejecting rock. It’s that rock is rejecting women.

But how is the music world fencing women out? Picking on the visible gatekeepers is easy, and in many ways fair: Record labels, magazines and music festivals don’t tend to give women artists an equal platform. Last year, a HuffPost analysis of the gender breakdown of acts at 10 major festivals over the past five years found that the vast majority of performers were male. “[A]ll-male acts make up the overwhelming majority of festival lineups, ranging from 66 percent of all performers (Outside Lands and Governors Ball) to 93 percent (Electric Zoo),” HuffPost Women’s Editor Alanna Vagianos concluded. An LA Times piece on Coachella’s specific problems with women noted that, at the time it was written, only one female act had ever headlined the festival, out of over 40 headliners in its history. 

Music media seems little better. In 2016, KQED Arts pointed out in December, exactly zero women made the cover of Rolling Stone ― no Beyoncé, no Rihanna, no Alessia Cara, no Hayley Williams. Women who do snag coverage by major outlets routinely see their musical chops downplayed in favor of their sex appeal, or wind up relegated to special women’s issues or listicles.

The problem, though, starts way before the point when the organizers of Coachella or Bonnaroo are scouting acts, and before magazines are picking out cover models. This isn’t an excuse for their paltry lineups of female artists; it’s just to say that there are other pressures guiding tastemakers toward men and guiding women to give up rock stardom.

Bands made up of all women are rare not because of a lack of talent, dedication or interest, but because women have been siphoned out of the pipeline at nearly every step of the way.

Getting The Band Together

For young boys, forming a crappy band is as elemental a part of growing up as playing baseball, or quitting the baseball team to spend more time smoking pot. If you’ve ever known a handful of teenage boys, you probably know at least one who’s been in a jam band inspired by Phish, or a dude rock band inspired by Dave Matthews, or an indie rock band inspired by Weezer. Guys in bands stand to benefit from male bonding, creative self-expression, and cultivating a rock god image to attract romantic interests. As Alex Pall of The Chainsmokers told Billboard in 2016, “Even before success, pussy was number one … I wanted to hook up with hotter girls.”

The flip side, however, is that this gendered adolescent experience rarely includes a space for girls to be anything but doting audiences and, at worst, “pussy.”

To me that was just kind of a given, guys were always starting bands and playing guitar in their bedrooms,” Allison Wolfe, the former lead singer of riot grrrl band Bratmobile and, most recently, Sex Stains, told me. She grew up in Olympia, home of artsy, crunchy Evergreen State College in Washington State, in the midst of the burgeoning ‘90s DIY punk scene. “I went to a lot of punk shows and saw guys playing. Olympia and Eugene were cool, not super macho like a lot of other places, but it still made me feel like I couldn’t really be a part of it.”

Suzie Zeldin, of the indie band The Narrative, spent her teenage years attending hardcore shows across the country, in Long Island, New York, that were packed with both male and female fans ― but vanishingly few female artists. “It was pretty rare actually to see a girl onstage,” she recalled.

And this was in the late ‘80s to early aughts. Decades ago, when rock ’n’ roll was really taking off, the scene was almost entirely male. “You go back to the ‘60s, and you’re talking about the dark ages of women in music, because the light that you’re putting out, there’s nothing to reflect it back,” said June Millington, co-founder and lead guitarist of the pioneering 1970s band Fanny. “You had to have the courage to walk into that cave that was completely dark.”

Her bandmate, drummer Alice DeBuhr, was blunt: “We didn’t think of ourselves as the beginning of or part of a tradition of women musicians. Because there weren’t any.” 

As with any boys’ club, some determined and talented women have always fought their way in. But bands aren’t just about individual moxie. Forming a band requires collaboration. As a teenage bassist in Australia, music writer Anwen Crawford, author of a New Yorker article titled “The World Needs Female Rock Critics,” wanted that classic, adolescent band experience. The only problem? “I could never find other girls to play with, in those crucial years when you’re forming bands,” she told me. “Your teacher is likely to be male, your peers are likely to be male. It’s quite isolating.”

Just playing with her male peers wasn’t a solution either, she pointed out: “The boys around me didn’t really take me seriously, or thought I was a novelty.”

For many years, and even, to some extent, today, women who did seriously pursue rock music were less likely to find a thriving community of female peers to play with. Female stars like P.J. Harvey, Joan Jett and Stevie Nicks, Crawford noted, typically ended up as solo artists or the sole women in mostly male bands. After Goldie and the Gingerbreads disbanded in 1967, Ravan joined a mostly-male band and later built a solo career.

The creeping, pervasive assumption that little boys learn drums and grow up to be rock stars while little girls play Barbies and grow up to be groupies can isolate and stifle young girls who do pursue music, or it can simply delay their start. Many talented female musicians don’t begin their careers until early adulthood, at the age when young people are exploring who they really are outside of their rigidly defined peer groups. By then, many of their male peers have been mucking around with their instruments and amateur bands for a decade ― but that gap isn’t an insurmountable obstacle.

Augusta Koch, the guitarist and vocalist of the pop-punk band Cayetana, readily admits that she “didn’t know how to play guitar” when Cayetana was born five years ago. Koch and her bandmates were all out of college and dreaming of starting a band when they met at a party in Philadelphia. They decided to join forces and polished their skills together, through years of intense solo and band practice.

Mindy Abovitz, drummer and founder of Tom Tom Magazine, started her first band in college, not long after she’d surreptitiously begun to learn drums. It would have made zero sense to be in a band with a guy at that time, because all my guy friends who were musicians had been in bands since they were 12,” she told me.

“I played music in school band, clarinet and bass clarinet, but it wasn’t until much later that I thought I could do something like be in a band,” recalled Bratmobile’s Wolfe. “But I think I was very lucky to grow up in Olympia.” In the midst of a music scene that prided itself on counter-culturalism and anti-professionalism,anyone could do anything, and it would be considered music,” she said.

Wolfe went to Eugene to attend the University of Oregon, but many weekends she’d return to Olympia with her friend and future bandmate, Molly Neuman, to hang around the music scene. They met Kathleen Hanna, then a student at Evergreen. Wolfe began to notice that women around her were forming their own bands ― and not cute, smiley bands. One day, the summer before college, she peeked into Hanna’s art gallery, Reko Muse, and saw a band rehearsal in progress. “There was Kathleen, onstage,” recalled Wolfe, “and she was just yelling at the top of her lungs, with her veins popping out of her neck, and her face was all red … It was really confrontational, and intense.” Hanna’s band, Bikini Kill, ended up becoming early supporters of Wolfe and Neuman’s nascent group.

Wolfe and Neuman wanted to be involved in the scene ― they were already referring to themselves as a band around Olympia ― but they didn’t actually begin writing and performing music until a friend asked them to play a show he was booking. Despite Bratmobile’s slapdash beginnings, their first show was a rousing success.

“I don’t think it would have happened outside the Olympia scene, because I don’t think we would have had the encouragement,” she admitted. “People would have laughed us off the stage. But instead we had Bikini Kill there cheering us on.”

Keeping The Band Together

Getting an all-girl band together is a magical achievement, but it’s only step one. Rock bands are notoriously fragile things. Internal power struggles, ego trips and artistic disagreements tear many of them apart. For women, though, the stress of fending off inappropriate behavior, condescension and disdain rooted in their gender often ends up compounding the ordinary struggles faced by every band.

Having overcome years of overt or implicit discouragement to choose a musical career, female musicians face exhausting assumptions: That they don’t understand their own gear or craft; that, if they came later to mastering the art form, they are perpetual amateurs; that they’re just hanging around the scene to get male attention. Cayetana’s drummer, Kelly Olsen, pointed out that “women getting into relationships with musicians… get looked at in a very different way than men that do. And I know that we have been judged by who we date, like, you’re just doing that to get close to this band. And it’s like, actually, no! I have my own self and my own power in my own scene.” 

The assumption, however, generally remains that women don’t belong onstage unless they’re accompanied and overseen by men. Lydia Night, the teenage frontwoman of The Regrettes, caught the rock fever early ― she’s been playing guitar since the age of six and has not only attended years of music classes but performed in several bands. Nonetheless, she’s noticed, sound technicians often assume she can’t handle her own equipment. The sexism is difficult to ignore thanks to one simple fact: The band has one male member, drummer Maxx Morando. “We’ve met so many amazing sound people,” she told me, “but we’ve met so many annoying sound people who just assume that … oh, of course Maxx knows how to set up his drums, but she must not know how to set up her amp.”

Though many of the women I spoke to said that they felt respected and appreciated by their male peers in the industry, the spaces men make for themselves aren’t always welcoming. Women might be left out of bands and tours by men who want to keep the fratty vibe, or who don’t want their significant others to worry about infidelity. “Tour buses are definitely places where women get excluded,” Abovitz said, referencing a situation she’d recently advised another female musician about. “They don’t get hired. They just get left off.” Her acquaintance and the other woman in her band weren’t invited on a bus due to this reasoning; in the end, they had to drive themselves separately for the entire tour.

When it’s not the men directly involved in the industry, it’s the press. Music journalism, a field that was carved out and is still largely populated by white men, has historically been hostile at worst, and patronizing at best, to female artists. “The assumption [was] that interviewers and other people could treat us with condescension and that was the norm,” says Millington. “That condescension was pretty lethal, because it can come at you in so many different ways, even the subtle ways cut ― at least 50 percent, 60 percent or more of the time, the condescension had to be there even if [critics] said they liked us.”

Critics and journalists might cover a girl band with a tone of surprise that a group of women could even play competently, or fixate on the band members’ sex appeal and gendered characteristics.  

Plus, female artists were played off each other, creating the impression that in the massive rock universe, there was only room for one woman star. “It was never about the music,” Raven remembered of her early reviews. “They always had to compare me with somebody.” Usually, the times being what they were, that somebody was Janis Joplin. In 1969, legendary rock critic Robert Christgau described her as “this group’s resident Janis Joplin” in a review of Ten Wheel Drive, a jazz-rock band she joined after Goldie and the Gingerbreads broke up. Joplin comes up yet again in his review of one of her solo albums, “Urban Desire,” in addition to the accusation that “she oversings.” (Christgau’s oeuvre is a trove of chauvinistic criticism, which is rarely subtle; he takes pains to graciously judge that Fanny’s “execution is competent enough.”)

In the early days of rock ’n’ roll, even audiences who presumably showed up to enjoy these shows were sexist by default. Millington and DeBuhr both vividly recalled one particular compliment from male listeners that seemed to dog Fanny throughout its run: “Not bad for chicks!”

No matter where they performed, “that was the best compliment we could get through the early ‘70s. Isn’t that incredible?” Millington told me. “And we almost always smiled and said ‘Thank you.’” Worse, Fanny often confronted the assumption that they couldn’t play their own songs. “I can’t remember how many times people asked us, ‘Who were the male musicians playing on the album?’” DeBuhr remembered. To a group of women who practiced and performed tirelessly and who took pride in their music, this question was particularly galling.

In the punk era, disdainful audiences could be more aggressive. Wolfe half-seriously insisted that her nearsightedness and poor hearing protected her ego from the vitriol of sexist crowds. “A lot of the time I was saved by the fact that I couldn’t see or hear what was going on in the audience,” she said. After Bratmobile’s second show, Kathleen Hanna met them offstage and asked if they were OK. Unbeknownst to them, some “scary metalhead dudes” in the crowd had been hollering death threats at the band throughout their set.

Harder to ignore: An incident at a show during Wolfe’s time in the late-’90s band Cold Cold Hearts, when a man grabbed her ass while she performed. “I actually started laughing, because it was just too shocking,” she said.

Some women involved with the music world saw a relatively egalitarian, non-threatening environment, at least in specific scenes. Punk historian Gillian McCain, co-author of the oral history Please Kill Me, pushed back on the idea that the early punk scene could be sexually exploitative. “The girls were enjoying their sexual freedom as much as the boys were,” she wrote in an email. “None of the women we interviewed saw themselves as victims.”

But there’s no denying that some women in the music industry have been victimized, and that the experience can directly affect their careers. Pop star and songwriter Kesha, the most infamous recent example, follows in a long line of women whose voices were snuffed out thanks to male exploitation. Due to her ironclad contract and current legal battle with her former producer, Dr. Luke, whom she has accused of sexual and other abuse, Kesha is reported to be sitting on at least 22 new songs she’s not allowed to bring out. 

In 2015, the original bassist of The Runaways, Jackie Fuchs, accused the band’s late manager, Kim Fowley, of raping her soon after she joined the band in 1975. She quit in 1977. In a HuffPost Highline feature, Jason Cherkis documented multiple alleged victims of Fowley’s sexual violence, primarily Fuchs and Kari Krome, a precocious songwriter Fowley began grooming at just 13 years old. By the time Cherkis spoke to Krome, some 40 years later, she had been out of the music business since her teen years, instead writing boxes full of unpublished lyrics. “[S]he couldn’t shake the idea that Fowley never believed in her talent, that he only wanted to sleep with her,” he wrote. “She ended up abandoning her dreams of becoming a successful songwriter.” 

Though it’s impossible to say how many women’s careers have been stunted or destroyed by sexual predation, even those who remain and succeed continue to face gendered criticism and abuse. With few other options, women musicians often embrace determinedly nonchalant attitudes toward their harassers and critics. “It’s hard to play a show when someone screams ‘you can’t play guitar’ or ‘you’re hot,’ but at the same time,” said Koch, “we try to not let it ruin us.”

During the riot grrrl movement of the ‘90s, women on the scene tried to find safety in solidarity. After the butt-grabbing incident at her Cold Cold Hearts show, Wolfe remembered, “The amazing thing is I didn’t have to do anything. It was a girl power show; all the women bounced him out in two seconds.” By urging “girls to the front” and forefronting feminism, riot grrrl created a safer space for women in rock ― at least temporarily.  In other times, in other cases, playing through the pain simply led to burnout. “I left Fanny in ‘73, because I was just tired,” Millington told me.

When women aren’t kept out of rock genres through sheer discouragement, exclusion or harassment, the malleable nature of the genre can also be used against them. Women artists may be edited out of the rock annals simply through gendered perceptions ― what men play is rock and what women play is pop. Nowhere is this more evidently the case than with black women, who, like black men, often find themselves reflexively categorized as R&B simply because of their race. As Rolling Stone’s Brittany Spanos wrote in 2016, the white appropriation of rock has been so total that it “box[es] black performers into R&B and soul categories no matter how genre-bending they are.”

“Though largely forgotten in our whitewashed annals of history,” LaTonya Pennington wrote in The Establishment, “black women helped create the genre of rock, which has its roots in blues, country, jazz, gospel and R&B.” Just as many pioneers of rock were black men ― Chuck Berry, Fats Domino, Little Richard and Bo Diddley ― many of the early female pioneers, like “Godmother of Rock ’n’ Roll” Sister Rosetta Tharpe, were black. White women were also often complicit in undercutting black women performers. The first recording of “Piece of My Heart” was performed by Erma Franklin ― known as an R&B singer ― yet it was white singer Janis Joplin ― known as a rocker ― whose rendition rose to fame.

The contributions of black women have been routinely swept under the rug and written out of rock history. But Pennington, Spanos and other critics have seen black women reclaiming their place in the rock genre in recent years, from undeniably rock acts such as The Alabama Shakes (fronted by vocalist and guitarist Brittany Howard) to indie darling Santigold to, yes, Beyoncé.

In “Lemonade,” the pop icon dabbled in country and rock ’n’ roll to great effect. “Beyoncé… provided one of the year’s most memorable rock moments with ‘[Don’t] Hurt Yourself,’” Crawford argued. “Here we have a song by a black woman artist (Beyoncé), who has not typically been ‘seen’ as a rock musician, which appropriates white rock masculinity in order to emphasize that the origins of rock music (in the blues) lie with black women, whose music was, in turn, appropriated by white men.” The all-important visuals work fluidly with the song to reinforce this message, she added. “The film clip … which begins and ends with a young black woman sitting behind a drum kit, makes literally visible this lineage of largely disregarded and historically invisible black female musicianship.”

Passing The Torch

With all the obstacles and forms of discouragement women in rock have faced over the decades, rock is no longer the coolest nor freshest genre. Does it even matter how inclusive it is to women anymore? Crawford, though she qualifies that it’s important for women to have equal opportunity in any genre, suggests women look elsewhere. The masculinization of the scene has been so entrenched, and the genre itself seems so archaic, that she “wouldn’t necessarily advise [a young woman today] to pick up a guitar. I think of rock music like the realist novel ― it’s fun, people are still doing it, but why?” And though “other genres have their own problems,” she pointed out, there’s a less lengthy and calcified history of exclusion to undo. Women have been making huge amounts of exciting, boundary-pushing music in electronic music, in pop and beyond ― rock just hasn’t been as welcoming.

Conversely, McCain downplayed the severity of the obstacles faced by women in punk rock ― though the punk scene was predominantly male. “Unfortunately that’s the case in a lot of vocations,” she wrote in an email. “I think there were barriers to both men and women making it in punk music! […] In some ways the women may have held an advantage as far as getting more media attention.” McCain cited breakout female stars of the era, from Patti Smith to Tina Weymouth, who remain popular today. As Ravan realized in the 1960s, being a woman in a man’s world could be a great marketing tool.  

Still, staking a visible claim to rock music isn’t just an ego trip for marginalized artists: It clears the path to stardom for those that follow. Not only does it make it easier for audiences and critics to conceptualize, for example, black and female artists as rockers, but it helps future musicians to avoid the derision, harassment and sense of alienation that has afflicted many.

Even today, women deal with gendered belittlement and abuse on tour. But audiences have seen enough female rock musicians to mitigate the level of scorn faced by individual artists. Where Fanny and Goldie and the Gingerbreads often felt like their gender was so unusual that it was simply treated as a gimmick ― the only reason people bothered to book them as opposed to the many male bands ― women who are currently early in their music careers see a more diverse scene. Night told me that The Regrettes perform alongside “a lot of women … super badass women.”

Zeldin has also toured with a number of bands with one or more woman. “There are a lot of bands that have at least some female presence. It’s nice to see that happening more and more,” she said.

Part of the more welcoming environment for women and gender non-binary individuals in rock has to do with changing norms, like a better understanding of the harm caused by sexual assault. Recalling her time in Fanny in the ‘70s, DeBuhr describes a scene that was not only permissive of male urges, but that lacked a language to talk about it critically. Though sometimes she felt deeply uncomfortable with the sexualized atmosphere, she told me, “At the time, I don’t think we called it sexual harassment … It was creepy, I didn’t like it.” Creepy behavior might still be fairly common in the music industry, but women musicians do have the vocabulary to talk about it. Take music publicist Heathcliff Berru, once a power player in the field. He fell precipitously from grace after a raft of female musicians and industry professionals ― most notably Amber Coffman of Dirty Projectors ― publicly accused him of various forms of sexual misconduct.

Even the idea that women can be rebels and artists as well as homemakers, mothers and playthings needed to emerge over the past few decades. Not only were the first all-girl bands were presented as gimmicks, they were often presented as sexualized ones. Fowley notoriously positioned The Runaways as a clique of sexy jailbait rather than serious musicians ― and that’s a temporary brand at best.

During high school, in 1960s Iowa, DeBuhr played in a girl band called Women. (“We were a gimmick,” explained. “That was the attraction, it was all girls.”) While at an Iowan club, teenage DeBuhr saw a female drummer in a jazz trio. The drummer was older, “maybe 40,” she recalled. “I said, ‘I will quit when I‘m 30. I won’t be an old lady playing the drums.” She did end up hanging up her drumsticks not long after Fanny broke up. Now, she says, she regrets it.

To a young DeBuhr, that solitary, middle-aged woman drummer may have seemed like an oddity at the time; the lack of visible female rock icons inevitably perpetuates the assumption that women don’t belong onstage, unless they’re go-go dancers or sultry vocalists. Even serious bands like Fanny and the Gingerbreads faced pressure to go onstage scantily clad ― which they resisted to varying degrees.

Perhaps the most important evolution has been the determined, serious incursion of women into the genre, a genre that at first seemed to have no place for them. Though Ravan and Millington cite a few forerunners as inspirations ― Etta James, Lillian Briggs ― they saw their own music as something different. They were playing rock ’n’ roll in bands, just like the boys.

Today, budding musicians have a pantheon of women rockstars to draw inspiration from and emulate. “When I was five, my dad took me to a Donnas concert … and I just fell in love with it,” Night told me. “The turning point for me ― I think I was 10 ― my mom took me to see a movie about the drummer of Hole. I started listening to a lot of Hole, Bikini Kill, Babes in Toyland.” 

A push for mostly all-women bands may be unlikely today because, in a more inclusive scene, female musicians see less of a need to huddle together. When Night initially fell in love with The Donnas, she longed to start an all-girl band; now, she says, she doesn’t even think about gender when forming a band. Zeldin, who has always worked with male musicians, felt the same. “I’d totally be down to do a girl band,” she told me. But she wouldn’t be motivated to do sojust because it would be all girls.”

The success of “girl rock” can come in waves. For groups like Fanny and Bratmobile, being all women was part of the point; at those times, it felt like both safety in solidarity and a way of making political statement. “If the whole point was giving voice to girls, then yeah, we wanted to play with other girls,” said Wolfe. After the overtly feminist, but flawed, riot grrrl scene faded, punk and indie rock seemed to contract around men again.

“I feel like riot grrrl ended in the mid-’90s, and by the late-‘90s there was a lot of backlash,” said Wolfe. “Suddenly there were a lot fewer girl bands in the punk scene, and it was like, what happened?” The backlash to riot grrrl, which she concedes had its own problems, still felt “like sexism. Or just dissing feminism.”

Though juggernaut all-women bands like Sleater-Kinney arose from and survived riot grrrl, they were more the exception than the rule. By the early aughts, critics were commenting on the almost startling sexism of the ascendant emo and punk scene. Andy Greenwald’s Nothing Feels Good: Punk Rock, Teenagers, and Emo noted the dearth of women on popular emo labels, as well as the overtly resentful and objectifying view emo artists took of women: “Now emo songwriters were one-sided victims of heartbreak, utterly wronged and ready to sing about it, with the women having no chance to respond.”

In an essay on emo misogyny from her 2015 book The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic, titled “Where the Girls Aren’t,” music journalist and critic Jessica Hopper remembered growing up in the era of riot grrrl. “For me, even as a teenage autodidact who thought her every idea was worthy of expression and an audience,” she wrote, “it did not occur to me to start a band until I saw other women in one.” Watching female fans at emo shows where all-male artists sang about cardboard-cutout women who had hurt them, she thought, “I don’t want these front row girls to miss that. I don’t want girls leaving clubs denied of encouragement and potential.” 

The clock couldn’t simply be turned back to the 1950s after the riot grrrl era ended, though. Bikini Kill records were still out there. We knew about the Bangles. Zeldin, who grew up frequenting the emo and hardcore scene, took the rarity of women onstage at those shows as a challenge. “I think that’s probably partially what drove me to do it, aside from having the inclination,” she told me. “It was more like ― I don’t see girls doing so let’s do it.”

Abovitz, who launched a whole publication to cover female drummers, believes fervently in the power of modeling. “There’s this sort of thing that every female drummer I know does: Go out and play a show not just for herself, but for every other female drummer,” she said. “You just want to do it, so that people will get over it already.”

The scene already looks less homogenous than it did 10 years ago, despite the daunting machismo of the aughts. Earlier generations of women musicians have sought to further their gains by promoting their own legacies, and even by educating new generations. Millington started the Institute for the Musical Arts (IMA) with her partner, Ann F. Hackler, in 1986. The institute runs rock camps for young girls, among other initiatives to support women in music. Camps like the IMA’s have begun to bear fruit ― like Night’s The Regrettes, formed by three girls and a boy who met in an LA School of Rock.

Though the genre has put up walls against women for decades, women have refused to stay out ― and the more they refuse, the more open the music industry becomes to all women.  

You gotta keep writing songs that speak out about this stuff, or keep being in bands, or whatever it is that you do,” said Wolfe. “Being there, inserting yourself in a space that isn’t common for women to be.”

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Dude Tumbles Down Stairs And Into Prom Fail History

The internet, like high school, never lets you forget.

Austin Cooper was descending stairs with girlfriend Jordyn McManus for a dramatic debut before the prom Saturday when his feet slid out from under him. He tumbled on his butt, falling into the clutches of the viral gods.

That’s because on Sunday, McManus, from Palm Beach, Florida, tweeted the embarrassing moment. 

Austin and I were trying to make a grand entrance for our family and friends for prom,” McManus told Mashable. “Obviously it didn’t go as planned.”

Cooper wasn’t seriously injured. “My back was hurting during the whole night of prom but I stuck with it and manned up,” he said to the website.

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“A United Kingdom” reclaims the history of the colonized

LOS ANGELES (AP) — It took a single image for both David Oyelowo and Amma Asante to fall for the true story of Seretse Khama and Ruth Williams. The cover of Susan Williams’ book “Colour Bar: The Triumph of Seretse Khama and His Nation” shows a dapper looking couple in the late 1940s walking hand in hand. Ruth is white. Seretse is black. And the mere fact of their decision to marry would rock the social fabric of their respective worlds and result eventually in Seretse’s exile from his country.
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Blac Chyna Bares It All ‘In Celebration Of Black History Month’

Blac Chyna has never been afraid to show some skin, and the reality star said she took it all off for a recent photoshoot to celebrate her heritage. 

Chyna shared three photographs on her Instagram on Thursday, all taken by photographer Orin Fleurimont. Each photo shows her wearing white body paint and is respectively captioned with a single word: “Queen. History. Bold.”

“In celebration of Black History Month, I wanted to push out my inner Queen, express my ethnicity and beauty unapologetically!” Chyna told People magazine.

Queen

A photo posted by Blac Chyna (@blacchyna) on

History

A photo posted by Blac Chyna (@blacchyna) on

Bold

A photo posted by Blac Chyna (@blacchyna) on

Fans couldn’t get enough of Chyna and chimed in on Twitter to praise her pictures:

She sure knows how to keep the surprises coming. 

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Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad

Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad


The dramatic story of fugitive slaves and the antislavery activists who defied the law to help them reach freedom. More than any other scholar, Eric Foner has influenced our understanding of America’s history. Now, making brilliant use of extraordinary evidence, the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian once again reconfigures the national saga of American slavery and freedom. A deeply entrenched institution, slavery lived on legally and commercially even in the northern states that had abolished it after the American Revolution. Slaves could be found in the streets of New York well after abolition, traveling with owners doing business with the city’s major banks, merchants, and manufacturers. New York was also home to the North’s largest free black community, making it a magnet for fugitive slaves seeking refuge. Slave catchers and gangs of kidnappers roamed the city, seizing free blacks, often children, and sending them south to slavery. To protect fugitives and fight kidnappings, the city’s free blacks worked with white abolitionists to organize the New York Vigilance Committee in 1835. In the 1840s vigilance committees proliferated throughout the North and began collaborating to dispatch fugitive slaves from the upper South, Washington, and Baltimore, through Philadelphia and New York, to Albany, Syracuse, and Canada. These networks of antislavery resistance, centered on New York City, became known as the underground railroad. Forced to operate in secrecy by hostile laws, courts, and politicians, the city’s underground-railroad agents helped more than 3,000 fugitive slaves reach freedom between 1830 and 1860. Until now, their stories have remained largely unknown, their significance little understood. Building on fresh evidence-including a detailed record of slave escapes secretly kept by Sydney Howard Gay, one of the key organizers in New York-Foner elevates the underground railroad from folklore to sweeping history. The story is inspiring-full of memorable characte

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This Dinner Party Handbook Is The Perfect Way To Learn Queer History

An awesome new project is in the works that will provide fodder for an inclusive conversation about queer history while bringing people together in a dinner party setting.

“Serving Pride: The Queer History Dinner Party Handbook” is currently engaged in a Kickstarter campaign but its creators hope to have the handbook complete by June ― just in time for Pride 2016.

“Coming out is, in some ways, one of the most important political acts we do as queer people,” co-creator Joey Stern told The Huffington Post. “We say to friends and family ‘See me, see me like this.’ Learning about our history, teaching others about our history, thats how we say to each-other ‘See us, see all of us.’ It’s not just learning history, but learning it together that really solidifies that experience. You’re not alone, you’re part of vast and connected community.”

Resources like “Serving Pride” are more important than ever, in an era when its easy to lose sight of our history as LGBTQ people and our collective struggles.

Head here to check out the Kickstarter campaign and keep your eyes peeled for more from “Serving Pride: The Queer History Dinner Party Handbook.”

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A Brief History of Superhero Movies at Awards Shows

As we near the Golden Globes on Sunday, there’s a distinct possibility that Deadpool could change the way awards show season has historically treated comic book movies by walking away with a best musical or comedy Globe.

Comic book movies, despite becoming one of the most dependable genres at the box office over the past decade, haven’t fared as well in the scrum of early-year awards shows. But it’s not all bad! While quite a lot of superhero movies have been nominated for the “technical” awards — makeup, sound, visual effects, art direction, etc — they tend not to fare as well when you get into the acting and directing categories. Let’s take a look at their history, below.

(Again, we’re ignoring the technical categories: Almost every Marvel tentpole from the past few years has been nominated in the visual effects category, and most of the superhero films of the ’90s picked up at least nominations for their technical work.)

Superman

Superman picked up a special visual effects Oscar, but its score — by usual Oscar sure-thing John Williams — failed to connect with the Academy and snag the corresponding trophy.

Dick Tracy

The Academy granted Stephen Sondheim a Best Original Song award for his contribution to Dick Tracy. (We’re including it because it was based on a comic strip and includes numerous not-exactly-realistic elements, even if it might not exactly fit the “superhero” mold.)

Men in Black

Did you guys know Men in Black was based on a comic book? From Marvel, no less? While it won a Best Makeup award for the effects from non-CGI makeup wizard Rick Baker, its score, by Danny Elfman (who also created the distinctive theme for Tim Burton’s original Batman movies) was left in the cold.

The Incredibles

It’s not strictly a “comic book movie,” but it’s definitely a superhero movie. And either way, Pixar’s feature film picked up a statuette for Best Animated Feature at its Academy Awards, so that has to count.

The Dark Knight

Aside from being a titanic performance that rivals Anthony Hopkins-as-Hannibal-Lecter in the “most impact made in shortest amount of screen time” category, Heath Ledger’s turn as the Joker in 2008’s The Dark Knight earned him a Best Supporting Actor Oscar (posthumously, sadly) and legitimized the modern era of comic book films. (It also probably paved the way for DC’s current fixation on all things grim, but that’s neither here nor there.) Ledger also won the equivalent Golden Globe for his performance.

Big Hero 6

Also originating from a Marvel comic, Big Hero 6 picked up an Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film of the year in 2014.

The Golden Globe Awards air on Sunday, Jan. 8, at 8 p.m. ET on NBC.

Check out the full list of 2017 Golden Globes nominees and get your own ballot here!


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The Oxford History of Western Music: Music in the Early Twentieth Century

The Oxford History of Western Music: Music in the Early Twentieth Century


The universally acclaimed and award-winning Oxford History of Western Music is the eminent musicologist Richard Taruskin’s provocative, erudite telling of the story of Western music from its earliest days to the present. Each book in this superlative five-volume set illuminates-through a representative sampling of masterworks-the themes, styles, and currents that give shape and direction to a significant period in the history of Western music. Music in the Early Twentieth Century, the fourth volume in Richard Taruskin’s history, looks at the first half of the twentieth century, from the beginnings of Modernism in the last decade of the nineteenth century right up to the end of World War II. Taruskin discusses modernism in Germany and France as reflected in the work of Mahler, Strauss, Satie, and Debussy, the modern ballets of Stravinsky, the use of twelve-tone technique in the years following World War I, the music of Charles Ives, the influence of peasant songs on Bela Bartok, Stravinsky’s neo-classical phase and the real beginnings of 20th-century music, the vision of America as seen in the works of such composers as W.C. Handy, George Gershwin, and Virgil Thomson, and the impact of totalitarianism on the works of a range of musicians from Toscanini to Shostakovich

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Highlights From Coach’s History

1941
The company is founded in Manhattan as a small, family-run leather goods workshop.
1961
Owners Miles and Lillian Cahn hire American sportswear pioneer Bonnie Cashin — noted for her use of industrial hardware, leathers and wool — as its first creative director.
1979
Lew Frankfort joins the firm as vice president of business development; he would become chief executive officer in 1995.
1981
Coach opens its first store, a 450-square-foot shop on Madison Avenue and 64th Street in New York.
1985
The Cahns sell Coach to Sara Lee Corp. for a reported $ 30 million; the brand’s sales are about $ 19 million at the time. Frankfort becomes president.
1986-88
Coach broadens its product mix, expands distribution and starts a rapid retail expansion domestically and in Europe and Asia.
1996
The company hires Reed Krakoff as its creative head to develop Coach as a modern lifestyle brand.
1996
Overall sales top $ 500 million. The firm signs its first license, with Movado Group for Coach watches. Following soon are phone cases with Motorola, footwear with Jimlar and more.
1999
Coach.com launches.
2000
Sara Lee sells 19 percent of the newly named Coach Inc. to the public through an initial public offering, raising $ 118 million at $ 16 a share.
2002
Coach licenses Marchon for Coach Eyewear; its first collection appears in 2003.
2005
Coach unveils its

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Kristen Wiig Sings A Very Questionable History Of Thanksgiving On ‘SNL’

Kristen Wiig joined “Saturday Night Live” cast members in singing the history of Thanksgiving.

But some of her claims — like Christopher Columbus sailing to the Americas from South Korea — were, let’s just say, somewhat dubious. It was enough to prompt special guests Steve Martin and Will Forte to drop in and call out Wiig on her inaccuracy.

“Guys, I know I adjusted some of the facts so they would rhyme, like any true historian,” Wiig said in her defense, before her guests also got swept up in the holiday spirit.

After all, who needs real facts in this post-truth world?

Check it out in the clip above.

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Iconic Moments in Beverly Hills, 90210 Fashion History: The Denim, the Bangs, the Dueling Spring Dance Dresses & More

Beverly Hills 90210If Beverly Hills, 90210 premiered while you were still in elementary school, then you spent a fair amount of time thinking about what high school would be like, with its parking lot full of BMWs…

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Iconic Moments in Beverly Hills, 90210 Fashion History: The Denim, the Bangs, the Dueling Spring Dance Dresses & More

Beverly Hills 90210If Beverly Hills, 90210 premiered while you were still in elementary school, then you spent a fair amount of time thinking about what high school would be like, with its parking lot full of BMWs…

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P . H . P . Downhill In Montana a Pictorial History Paperback Book

P . H . P . Downhill In Montana a Pictorial History Paperback Book


Early Day Skiing in the Treasure State and Yellowstone National ParkAlpine skiing in Montana and Yellowstone National Park has a rich past dating from the late 19th century. From simple homemade rope tows to present high-speed quad chair lifts and trams the history of over 60 ski areas is illustrated in this book in black and white and color photographs newspaper articles correspondence ski patches and personal accounts.FEATURES: by Stan Cohen 278 Pages Color Black and White 500 Photos Maps Brochures Letters Charts Paperback
List Price: $ 24.95
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�P�gale! Historia de las herramientas (Hit It! History of Tools) (Time for Kids) (Spanish Edition)

�P�gale! Historia de las herramientas (Hit It! History of Tools) (Time for Kids) (Spanish Edition)


Find out how tools have helped people hunt, build, and make life easier in this engaging, Spanish-translated nonfiction title. With colorful images, timelines, charts, a glossary to assist with vocabulary improvement, and an index, children will learn how tools throughout time have made such an important impact on life as we know it! Featured eras include the Stone Age and the Industrial Revolution.
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The Breast is History: An Intimate Memoir of Breast Cancer

The Breast is History: An Intimate Memoir of Breast Cancer


In 2011 writer and mother of two, Bronwyn Hope is diagnosed with early stage breast cancer. Encouraged by a friend, she begins an online blog in which she faithfully diarises the days that follow, graphically chronicling the details of even her darkest days as they happen. Her reflections are controlled yet raw and immediate, comprising a mix of honesty and humor that will have you by turns laughing out loud, or crying. Over an 18-month period, Bronwyn propels her readers on a journey that will deliver to her some of life’s greatest blows and most uplifting moments. Along the way she shares intimate accounts of her life, her family and friends, and the challenges, both common and uncommon, of a breast cancer survivor. The Breast is History is that rare book that will delight and move readers at the same time as demystifying the experience of millions of women with breast cancer. About the Author: Born in Sri Lanka to parents of mixed Sinhalese, Scottish and Belgian heritage, Bronwyn Hope lives in the sunny state of Queensland, Australia with her husband, Alan, her two children, Harrison and Benjamin, and her labradoodle, Spunky. Bronwyn is a public relations consultant who currently runs a small consultancy from home, sometimes being paid handsomely by generous clients for her work. What this really means is that, in the main, she sits around in her pyjamas for a big part of the morning, playing online Scrabble, Facebooking and drinking coffee. Sometimes, this also means she has time to write, the result being one work of fiction, 4:05-A Novel, a small collectible book titled A Little Gift of Wisdom, a Presentation Training workbook, and a compendium of poetry that is soon to be released. In her spare time, Bronwyn indulges a suite of interests which, at time of writing, includes soccer refereeing, rowing, swimming, walking her dog, trivia, drawing and painting, music, public speaking, cryptic crosswords, entertaining and learning Spanish. Bronwyn is currently work

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Invisible Stars: A Social History of Women in American Broadcasting

Invisible Stars: A Social History of Women in American Broadcasting


Invisible Stars was the first book to recognize that women have always played an important part in American electronic media. The emphasis is on social history, as the author skillfully explains how the changing role of women in different eras influenced their participation in broadcasting. This is not just the story of radio stars or broadcast journalists, but a social history of women both on and off the air. Beginning in the early 1920s with the emergence of radio, the book chronicles the ambivalence toward women in broadcasting during the 1930s and 1940s, the gradual change in status of women in the 1950s and 1960s, the increased presence of women in broadcasting in the 1970s, and the successes of women in broadcasting in the 1980s and 1990s. The second edition is expanded to include the social and political changes that occurred in the 2000s, such as the growing number of women talk show hosts; changing attitudes about women in leadership roles in business; more about minority women in media; and women in sports and women sports announcers. The author addresses the question of whether women are in fact no longer invisible in electronic media. She provides an assessment of where progress for women (in society as well as broadcasting) can be seen, and where progress appears totally stalled.

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Mauritania in Perspective: Orientation Guide and Hassaniya Cultural Orientation: Geography, History, Economy, Security, Nouakchott, Nouadhibou, Rosso, Taya, Sanhadja, Almoravids, Sudanic Kingdoms

Mauritania in Perspective: Orientation Guide and Hassaniya Cultural Orientation: Geography, History, Economy, Security, Nouakchott, Nouadhibou, Rosso, Taya, Sanhadja, Almoravids, Sudanic Kingdoms


This is a professionally-formatted, free flowing ebook reproduction of unique, up-to-date guides produced by the Department of Defense that provide comprehensive information about all aspects of life in Mauritania, with a special emphasis on geography, history, the economy, society, security and military matters, religion, traditions, urban and rural life, ethnic groups, crime, the environment, government, holidays, gender issues and much more. CHAPTER 1: GEOGRAPHY * Geographic Divisions and Topographic Features * Climate * Bodies of Water * Major Cities * Nouakchott * Nouadhibou * Rosso, Bogue, and Kaedi * Hazards * Environmental Issues * CHAPTER 2: HISTORY * The Western Sahara: Migrations and Trade * The Sanhadja Confederation and the Almoravids * The Sudanic Kingdoms * Arabs and Moors * Early European Contacts * French Pacification of Mauritania * The Later French Colonial Era * Independence and Unification * The Western Sahara Conflict * The Salek and Haidalla Regimes * Mauritania Under Taya * The Fall of Taya * The Third Republic * Recent Events * CHAPTER 3: ECONOMY * Agriculture * Industry * Energy Resources * Mineral Resources * Trade * Tourism * Banking and Currency * Investment * Transportation * Standard of Living Organizations * CHAPTER 4: SOCIETY * Ethnic and Linguistic Groups * Moors * Black Africans * Language Policy * Religion * Gender Issues * Obesity * Marriage, Polygamy, and Divorce * Traditional Clothing * Arts * Music * Film * Sports and Recreation * CHAPTER 5: SECURITY * U.S-Mauritanian Relations * Relations with Neighboring Countries * Morocco/Western Sahara * Senegal * Mali * Algeria * Military * Terrorist Groups and Activities * Other Issues Affecting Stability * Political Instability * Ethnic Conflict * CHAPTER 1: PROFILE * Geography * Area * Climate * Geographical Divisions and Topographical Features * Saharan Zone * Sahelian Zone * Senegal River Valley Zone * Coastal Zone * Rivers and Lakes * Senegal River * Gorgol River * Karakoro River *

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Youth's History Of California

Youth's History Of California


This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections

such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact,

or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections,

have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works

worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

++++

The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to ensure edition identification:

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<title> Youth''s History Of California<edition> 2<authors> Louise Palmer Heaven, T. E.<publisher> A. Roman, 1883<subjects> California
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The Enlightenment: History, Documents, and Key Questions

The Enlightenment: History, Documents, and Key Questions


Based on the most recent scholarship, this book provides students and interested lay readers with a basic introduction to key facts and current controversies concerning the Enlightenment. Provides the Enlightenment in various formats, thereby enabling students to better understand and fully appreciate its causes and effects Develops critical thinking skills through the interplay of primary and secondary sources Includes argumentative essays that showcase the diversity of informed opinions on the modern Enlightenment Supports NCHS World History content standards for Era 6, Standard 2E

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North Carolina Lighthouses: A Tribute of History and Hope

North Carolina Lighthouses: A Tribute of History and Hope


From Google Books, “For more than 200 years, North Carolina’s stoic lighthouses have defined the state’s lacy yet lethal coastline as residents have worked to outsmart the impetuous shoals of the Graveyard of the Atlantic. Celebrating these revered symbols of warning and welcome, North Carolina’s leading lighthouse experts, Bruce and Cheryl Shelton Roberts, explore how and why North Carolinians have bravely defended themselves from shifting winds and waves. Their years of extensive research have produced groundbreaking information and insights into the complex world of coastal North Carolina.
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SEC Men’s Basketball: Florida Gators History, Head Coaches, Notable Players and Other Facts

SEC Men’s Basketball: Florida Gators History, Head Coaches, Notable Players and Other Facts


This book is a must-have for Florida basketball fans, including chapters on the Southeastern Conference, the university, Stephen C. O”Connell Center, Head Coach Billy Donovan, season histories, stats, rivalry games and traditions. Also provides details about the numerous former Gators to play in the NBA including David Lee, other star players and a special look at former head coaches. With chapters about the 2006 and 2007 Championship-winning seasons. This book was created and put into distribution by a team of dedicated editors using open source and proprietary publishing tools. One of the advantages to the way we publish books is that our content is up to date and written by dedicated subject matter experts from all over the world. By adding a layer of screening and curatorial attention to this material, we are able to offer a book that is relevant, informative and unique.

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A History of Evil in Popular Culture: What Hannibal Lecter, Stephen King, and Vampires Reveal About America [2 volumes]

A History of Evil in Popular Culture: What Hannibal Lecter, Stephen King, and Vampires Reveal About America [2 volumes]


Evil isn’t simply an abstract theological or philosophical talking point. In our society, the idea of evil feeds entertainment, manifests in all sorts of media, and is a root concept in our collective psyche. This accessible and appealing book examines what evil means to us. Includes the insights of scholars from widely different academic fields to inspect evil from various points of view, giving readers a broader perspective on the topic Compiles expert opinions from American, American expatriate, European, Asian, and Middle Eastern contributors Covers the portrayal of evil in many different forms of media-film, television, music, art, video games, literature, poetry-as well as in politics, current events, and the legal arena

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�Schools of Tomorrow�, Schools of Today: What Happened to Progressive Education (History of Schools and Schooling, V. 8)

�Schools of Tomorrow�, Schools of Today: What Happened to Progressive Education (History of Schools and Schooling, V. 8)


�Schools of Tomorrow,� Schools of Today documents some of the child-centered progressive schools founded in the first half of the twentieth century and provides histories of some more contemporary examples of progressive practices. Part I discusses seven progressive schools founded in the first part of the twentieth century (Francis W. Parker; Organic; Park; City and Country; Lincoln; Dalton; Arthurdale), tracing them from their beginnings to the present, or until their regrettable demises. Part II examines four more contemporary schools (Butterfield; Free Union Country; Urban Academy; W. Haywood Burns), showing how progressive practices gained momentum from the 1960s onward. As a volume in the History of Schools and Schooling series, this book seeks to look to the past for what it can teach us today. The lessons from the past about what has happened to progressive education hopefully will inform contemporary debates.
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Henry VIII and History

Henry VIII and History


Henry VIII remains the most iconic and controversial of all English Kings. For over four-hundred years he has been lauded, reviled and mocked, but rarely ignored. In his many guises – model Renaissance prince, Defender of the Faith, rapacious plunderer of the Church, obese Bluebeard- he has featured in numerous works of fact and faction, in books, magazines, paintings, theatre, film and television. Yet despite this perennial fascination with Henry the man and monarch, there has been little comprehensive exploration of his historiographic legacy. Therefore scholars will welcome this collection, which provides a systematic survey of Henry’s reputation from his own age through to the present. Divided into three sections, the volume begins with an examination of Henry’s reputation in the period between his death and the outbreak of the English Civil War, a time that was to create many of the tropes that would dominate his historical legacy. The second section deals with the further evolution of his reputation, from the Restoration to Edwardian era, a time when Catholic commentators and women writers began moving into the mainstream of English print culture. The final section covers the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, which witnessed an explosion of representations of Henry, both in print and on screen. Taken together these studies, by a distinguished group of international scholars, offer a lively and engaging overview of how Henry’s reputation has been used, abused and manipulated in both academia and popular culture since the sixteenth century. They provide intriguing insights into how he has been reinvented at different times to reflect the cultural, political and religious demands of the moment; sometimes as hero, sometimes as villain, but always as an unmistakable and iconic figure in the historical landscape.

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You Can Own a Piece of Sneaker History

One of Nike’s early endorsement contracts is up for auction.

Style – Esquire

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A Brief History of Ellen DeGeneres’s Amazing Halloween Costumes

A brief history of Ellen DeGeneres’s  amazing halloween costumes.

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Ohio’s Lake Erie Islands: A Brief History in Words and Pictures

Ohio’s Lake Erie Islands: A Brief History in Words and Pictures


Strewn across the Western Basin of Lake Erie, Ohio’s Lake Erie lslands are often known as the Vacationland of the Midwest. This book provides a firsthand look at each of the islands, their varied histories, and their natural beauty, using words and original photography. Included in this book is a detailed look at some of the most popular Ohio islands to visit – Kelleys, Put-In-Bay/South Bass, and Middle Bass – as well as information on some of the lesser-known islands such as North Bass, Rattlesnake, Green, Gibraltar, and others. A must for every travel library, Ohio’s Lake Erie Islands provides a detailed introduction to those new to this unique area, and brilliant color photographs make it a great remembrance for past visitors.Written by Chad Waffen, hardcover, 50 pages, ISBN: 978-0-9777891-0-1.
List Price: $ 18.50
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Biography of a Tenement House in New York City: An Architectural History of 97 Orchard Street

Biography of a Tenement House in New York City: An Architectural History of 97 Orchard Street


I trace my ancestry back to the Mayflower,” writes Andrew S. Dolkart. “Not to the legendary ship that brought the Pilgrims to Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1620, but to the more prosaic tenement on the southeast corner of East Broadway and Clinton Street named the Mayflower, where my father was born in 1914 to Russian-Jewish immigrants.” For Dolkart, his father’s experience of being raised in a tenement became a metaphor for the life that was afforded countless immigrant children growing up in Lower Manhattan during the past century. In this revised edition of his classic book, Dolkart presents for us a precise and informative biography of a typical tenement house in New York City that became, in 1988, the site for the Lower East Side Tenement Museum. The author documents, analyzes, and interprets the architectural and social history of this building at 97 Orchard Street, beginning in the 1860s when it was erected, moving on to the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries when the neighborhood started to change, and concluding in the present day as the building is reincarnated as the museum. This edition includes new research on the basement storefronts (specifically the Schneider saloon and the kosher butcher), the backyard privies and their reconstruction, and the new Irish Moore apartment. “Biography of a Tenement House in New York City “is a lasting tribute to the legacy of immigrants and their children, who were part of the transformation of New York City and the fabric of everyday American urban life. Distributed for the Center for American Places at ColumbiaCollege Chicago

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Progressive Sight Reading Exercises for Piano By Tutorial Fellow and University Lecturer in History Hannah Smith (Sheet music)

Progressive Sight Reading Exercises for Piano By Tutorial Fellow and University Lecturer in History Hannah Smith (Sheet music)


Overview A group of resourceful kids start “solution-seekers.com,” a website where “cybervisitors” can get answers to questions that trouble them. But when one questioner asks the true meaning of Christmas, the kids seek to unravel the mystery by journeying back through the prophecies of the Old Testament. What they find is a series of “S” words that reveal a “spectacular story!” With creative characters, humorous dialogue and great music, The “S” Files is a children’s Christmas musical your kids will love performing. Product details Isbn-13: 9780793552627, 978-0793552627 Author: Tutorial Fellow and University Lecturer in History Hannah Smith Publisher: Associated Music Publishers Publication date: 1986-11-01 About Wordery Wordery is one of the UK’s largest online booksellers. With millions of satisfied customers who enjoy low prices on a huge range of books, we offer a reliable and trusted service and consistently receive excellent feedback. We offer a huge range of over 8 million books; bestsellers, children’s books, cheap paperbacks, baby books, special edition hardbacks and textbooks. All our books are dispatched from the UK. Wordery offers Free Delivery on all UK orders, and competitively priced international delivery. #HappyReading

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Last Night a DJ Saved My Life: The History of the Disc Jockey

Last Night a DJ Saved My Life: The History of the Disc Jockey


New – To celebrate 100 years of DJing, Bill Brewster and Frank Broughton have expanded and updated their classic account of the history of the disc jockey. The DJ was born on Christmas Eve, 1906 when Reginald Fessenden became the first person to play a record over the radio. A century later and the DJ is the central figure in popular music. From these humble ‘talking jukebox’ origins to today’s DJ superstars earning rock star salaries with a fanbase to match, the history of the DJ is fascinating

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