Jeffrey Epstein Found Dead in Apparent Suicide

Jeffrey Epstein, the multimillionaire financier who was accused of sex trafficking, was found dead Saturday morning. He was 66. Epstein hanged himself in his jail cell at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan, according to multiple reports. He was placed on suicide watch last week after he was found injured with marks on his neck. […]

Variety

SHOPPING DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Jeffrey Epstein Dies in Apparent Suicide

Jeffrey Epstein was found dead in an apparent suicide in his Manhattan jail cell on Saturday. The convicted sex offender reportedly hung himself at the Metropolitan Correctional Center, according to NBC News. Epstein was transported to a nearby hospital where he reportedly went into cardiac arrest. On July 6, Epstein was charged for one count of sex trafficking of minors and one count of conspiracy to engage in sex trafficking of minors between 2002 and 2005. He was being held in the Manhattan prison awaiting his court date and was denied bail. If convicted, Epstein would have faced a maximum of 45 years in prison. His death comes days after L Brands’ chairman, Leslie Wexner, claimed that the two had a falling out because Epstein misappropriated over $ 46 million from him and his family. The two were closely linked until the late aughts, with Epstein later taking ownership of Wexner’s Manhattan home on East 71st Street, the same residence that prosecutors demanded Epstein forfeit. Read more here:  L Brands Probe Into Wexner and Epstein Hit Retailer’s Shares L Brands’ Les Wexner Makes First Comment on Jeffrey Epstein How Jeffrey Epstein Is Linked to Fashion, Media and President Trump WATCH: 5 Ways ThirdLove Is Innovating Bra Shopping if(typeof(jQuery)==”function”){(function($ ){$ .fn.fitVids=function(){}})(jQuery)}; jwplayer(‘jwplayer_m31GEjpc_V9usQ9H0_div’).setup( {“playlist”:”https:\/\/content.jwplatform.com\/feeds\/m31GEjpc.json”,”ph”:2} );

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.

Read More…
WWDWWD
TideBuy Black Friday Sale 90% Off+ Extra Coupon

Ronda Rousey Opens Up About Her Father’s Tragic Suicide on Hollywood Medium: “He Was the Best”

Ronda Rousey, Hollywood Medium 307Even the strongest of fighters break down.
And that includes former UFC champion, Ronda Rousey, who gets emotional when opening up about her father’s tragic suicide in this clip from…

E! Online (US) – Top Stories

Special Entertainment News Bulletin:


Check Groupon First

Aaron Hernandez’s Double Life: Inside the Aftermath of His Suicide and the Questions Left Unanswered

Aaron HernandezAaron Hernandez’s suicide last April meant the disgraced former football star’s short life was over, but it did not mark the end of his story.
To the families who lost loved ones,…

E! Online (US) – Top Stories

Special Entertainment News Bulletin:


Check Groupon First

Aaron Hernandez’s Double Life: Inside the Aftermath of His Suicide and the Questions Left Unanswered

Aaron HernandezAaron Hernandez’s suicide last April meant the disgraced former football star’s short life was over, but it did not mark the end of his story.
To the families who lost loved ones,…

E! Online (US) – TV News

SPECIAL TIP UPDATE!

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend Game Changer: How TV’s Madcap Musical Comedy Delivered a Sobering Examination of Suicide & Mental Health

Rachel Bloom, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend Season 3Since its premiere in 2015, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend has never shied away from a willingness to go there. After all, when your central conceit hinges on a character struggling with mental illness who…

E! Online (US) – TV News

SPECIAL TIP UPDATE!

Watch Prince William’s Tearful Meeting with Teen Who Attempted Suicide: ‘It’s So Personal’

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Prince William took on a therapist-style role as he hosted a moving video with a mother who lost her son, and a teen who contemplated suicide over cyberbullying.

The women, who were the prince’s guests at Kensington Palace, spoke to the royal dad about their deep traumas following the consequences of online abuse.

The film reveals William’s motivation for his taskforce on cyberbullying. Mom Lucy Alexander and teen Chloe Hine both contributed to the taskforce’s investigation over the last 18 months.

After the birth of his son, Prince George, William heard about a young boy “who had killed himself following a vicious campaign of online bullying,” a Kensington Palace statement says. “As he looked into the issue further it was soon clear there were many similar stories from the UK and around the world.”

He was then inspired to set up the ambitious taskforce, which brings together tech and media companies.

Last year, Lucy Alexander shared the story about her son, Felix, who took his own life following online abuse. She started her own campaign to raise awareness of the issues in an effort to ensure no other parents would suffer the heartbreak of losing a child to online bullies. “ read Lucy’s story and asked her to be one of the parents to help the taskforce better understand the impact of cyberbullying,” the statement adds.

RELATED VIDEO: Prince William Condemns ‘Barbaric’ Illegal Wildlife Trade

In the video, which ends with William giving both women a compassionate hug, Lucy Alexander says, “I sort of feel that Felix has given me a job to do – and my job is to make sure that we try and help as many other people like him.”

Chloe Hine, who was a member of William’s Taskforce Youth Panel, attempted to take her own life at 13 years old after being attacked online. She explains in the video that it was while writing a goodbye note that she found comfort in the ability to express what she had been unable to say in person. “On social media you can’t escape it, you’re constantly with that bully. People just turned against me because they thought ‘she said this one thing this one time so let’s all hate her for that’, and it just spiraled out of control from there.”

She continues: “It’s written down, so it’s there to look back at, time and time again. And if you’re in a negative space, that’s all you can see. You look for the negativity and you look for the cruel things.”

William brought together some of the world’s most recognizable names in media and tech, such as Apple, Facebook, Google, Twitter and online media companies, as well as children’s charities and parents, to work alongside the panel of young people to find ways to tackle cyberbullying.

On Thursday, William is set to unveil the results of his taskforce, which was chaired by tech entrepreneur Brent Hoberman.

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).


PEOPLE.com

Fashion Deals Update:

Jared Leto ‘Proud’ to Be Part of Suicide Squad

Jared Leto is more than happy to continue playing the Joker in the DC Extended Universe.

His recent appearance on the Australian “Kyle and Jackie O” show featured a segment in which he was quizzed on his involvement in 2016’s Suicide Squad, which was notable both for his approach to the role—allegedly sending his castmates gifts including a live rat and a dead pig—and for Leto’s vocal disappointment over the way the Joker was handled in the film’s final edit.

Continue reading…

IGN All

SHOPPING DISCOUNT UPDATE:

GameStop, Inc.

Teenager Alexa Curtis, Who Considered Suicide at 15, Reacts to 13 Reasons Why

At 15 years old and the target of incessant cyberbullies, Alexa Curtis nearly ended it all.

But she survived — and now, at the age of 19, she oversees the non-profit Media Impact and Navigation for Teens, a program to raise awareness about online bullying.

When Curtis, who is also a fashion blogger, decided to watch Netflix’s new series 13 Reasons Why, she never expected she’d be so critical of it.

“That last episode , I had so many moments where I thought, ‘This is what I wanted to do,’ ” Curtis explains to PEOPLE. “I am so glad I didn’t watch this at 15, because I probably would have done something.”

The 13-episode series, based on Jay Asher’s hit young adult novel of the same name, premiered on March 31 and centers on the contents of 13 cassette tapes left behind by high school student Hannah Baker, who killed herself after making the tapes for the people she felt were responsible.

“It makes look like an easy way out,” Curtis says, “and lots of girls I’ve spoken to say it hits too close to home — that it was just too alarming to watch, as it depicted situations they had been in before.”

The show was well-received by critics for its unflinching look at the dark side of teenage relationships — including alcohol and drug use and sexual assault — and it has been the focus of intense social media conversation.

But that attention has also bolstered the controversy it faces for its depiction of self-harm.

“I thought that the show was, in a way, glamorizing teen suicide,” Curtis tells PEOPLE. “The fact that Hannah Baker is living on through these tapes, that her voice is still echoing on … that gives a bad presentation.”

This week, Netflix announced a decision to add a warning to the show before it can be viewed and to strengthen its episode advisories.

“Entertainment has always been the ultimate connector,” the network said in a statement, “and we hope that 13 Reasons Why can serve as a catalyst for conversation.”

“We worked with experts to show how these issues impact teens in real and dramatic ways,” Netflix said.

Dr. Victor Schwartz, chief medical officer at the suicide prevention non-profit JED Foundation, agrees that the series “created great conversation.”

“But now suicide is what happens when people wrong you,” he says.

• For more on 13 Reasons Why and what parents need to know, subscribe now to PEOPLE or pick up this week’s issue, on newsstands now.

As someone who grappled with suicidal thoughts, Curtis tells PEOPLE that families should get involved and ask questions.

“A lot of young adults have already watched the show, so parents should immediately talk to their kids and ask them things like, ‘How did it make you feel?’ ” she says.” ‘Do you know any friends who are going through this sort of thing? What would you do if you saw someone inappropriately touching your friend?’ ”

“I think parents should check in with their kids every week,” Curtis says, “just ask them, ‘How are you feeling? Do you ever feel depressed like Hannah does on the show?’ ”

She says that while the topic of suicide may be sensitive — and statistics show it is a leading cause of death for people ages 10-24 — silence could do more harm than good.

That recommendation is echoed by mental health experts who say reaching out to someone in need is a simple but highly effective suicide prevention technique.

“Uncomfortable issues will come up for teens” who have seen the show, Curtis says. “They may self-harm, which is not the best route to go. Parents need to talk to their children. They need to be a friend and a parent at the same time now and make their kids comfortable with opening up.”

If you or someone you know is showing warning signs of suicide, consider contacting the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK, texting “HOME” to the Crisis Text Line at 741741 or seeking help from a professional.


PEOPLE.com

Fashion Deals Update:

‘Suicide Squad’ Finally Gets The Brutally ‘Honest Trailer’ It Deserves

Maybe calling Jared Leto “Heath Lesser” wouldn’t have been the ideal way to promote his role in “Suicide Squad” before the film’s release last summer. But in the latest Honest Trailer, hindsight tells it like it is.

This cheeky preview embraces the bad reviews that pummeled the film, including the ones aimed at Leto, who played the Joker. Honest Trailers said his interpretation “combines James Franco in ‘Spring Breakers’ with Ace Ventura.”

Ouch.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Comedy – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Mobile Playboy today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Teen ‘Choking Game’ Played Solo Points to Suicide Risks

Kids who tried this game alone were almost 5 times more likely to think of killing themselves, study finds
healthfinder.gov Daily News
SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN!-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News-
HEALTH SPECIALS!!-

Save up to 50% at Walgreens

Younger Native Americans Face High Suicide Rate: Report

Experts say poverty may be the root of the problem, interventions are lacking
healthfinder.gov Daily News
SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN!-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News-
HEALTH SPECIALS!!-

Save up to 50% at Walgreens

Addressing Veteran Suicide Head-on: Q&A With Oscar Winner Ellen Goosenberg Kent

One number: 22. That’s all it took to transform Ellen Goosenberg Kent from a filmmaker to a woman on a mission. “When I heard that 22 veterans are killing themselves every day, I thought: This is outrageous. That’s almost one every hour. I had to do something,” she said. Goosenberg Kent was already a strong voice on veterans’ issues. In 2007 she partnered with the late James Gandolfini to create Alive Day Memories, a heartwrenching documentary in which soldiers from the Iraq War reflected on the days they almost died in combat.

But suicide, that was a silent epidemic, one that needed to be addressed head-on. “I kept thinking: How can I make that number real for people? When I learned about the Veterans Crisis Line,” a suicide hotline created by the Department of Veterans Affairs in 2007, “I realized that this was an opportunity, a chance to capture a glimmer of hope in a sea of suffering.”

The director convinced the V.A. to grant her access to the crisis line’s Canandaigua, NY., facility, where she spent the next three months filming trained responders as they answered calls from suicidal veterans, some of them armed and ready to act. Goosenberg Kent spliced her footage into a 40-minute film that crackles with a disquieting, nervous energy. The movie has more drama than any action picture released this year and a greater grasp of the soldier experience than most of the war films of the last decade.

Crisis Hotline: Veterans Press 1 premiered on HBO last November. In February it won the Oscar for Best Documentary (Short Subject). And today, Independence Day, as millions nationwide honor our vets, Americans have the chance to watch the film with family, through HBO Go, Google Play and Amazon Instant Video.

Goosenberg Kent spoke with me about her film, the importance of the suicide hotline, and what each of us can do to help our veterans.

Kors: I have to challenge you about that statistic: 22 veteran suicides a day. It comes from the V.A., and you cite it in the beginning of the film. But how can we possibly know a number like that?

Goosenberg Kent: It’s an estimate. We spent a lot of time trying to vet it. But it’s very difficult to reliably gather suicide statistics. My sense is that the real figure may be much larger, that veterans’ suicides are widely underreported. But even if it is just 22 — one is too many. So 22 is insane.

Kors: And yet your film spends no time casting blame, not on the administration, not on the V.A. It’s focused on the crisis hotline responders, who display such intelligence and empathy as they to talk these veterans down from the brink.

Goosenberg Kent: That’s right. There’s a lot of blame to go around when it comes to these suicides. And exploring who is to blame is important. But I realized, we had an opportunity here, a chance for a fresh perspective by focusing on the good guys, the responders who are using compassion, training and focus to save lives. As a filmmaker, I wanted to do more than present the problem. I wanted to offer a lifeline of hope. That’s what the Veterans Crisis Line is.

Kors: It’s Ground Zero for the epidemic.

Goosenberg Kent: Absolutely. At the call center, it’s wave after wave of veterans, alone, in the dark, crying out for help. You spend a little time there, and you really get the scope of the problem.

Kors: How did you get access to the facility?

Goosenberg Kent: Well, the V.A. had let the New York Times in for a piece they produced in 2010. But what we wanted was a whole different level of access. Basically, we wanted to embed, to be there for three or four months and just watch the place work, to hear the soldiers in crisis and watch the responders as they assist them.

Kors: That’s one of the amazing ironies of the film: it captures the voice of veterans better than so many other movies, and yet the only voices in the movie are the responders’, not the callers’.

Goosenberg Kent: Because the V.A. doesn’t tape the calls.

Kors: It doesn’t?

Goosenberg Kent: No, it doesn’t. That surprised us too. We thought it would be like 911, which records all of its calls. But veterans’ conversations with the responders are just between them. To get access to the call center, we had to commit to not taping those calls either. Which meant that, with one side of the conversation, we didn’t know what we had. We didn’t know if there was enough to make a film.

Then we came back from our first few days of shooting and watched the footage. There was a call from a 20-year-old veteran whose best friend died in his arms. Maureen, [one of the crisis hotline responders], talked to him in a way that was incredibly moving. He thought this life was over, and she was able to seize on his ambivalence, keep him from acting on his impulse. She bought him some time to reconsider living, to realize that he wasn’t responsible for his friend’s death. On another call, Luis, who was an Army sergeant before becoming a responder, he talked about going through combat in such a powerful way. The caller was crying so loudly, you could hear it over the phone. Luis was emphatic. He told him: “If you ever feel like this again, you pick up the phone.” I thought we were going to be hearing phone therapy, but wow, this was different.

Dana Perry, who produced the film, her son committed suicide. When we first got to call center and started watching the responders, she got so silent. I asked her what’s going on, and she said, “It never occurred to me to call a hotline. Maybe if he had a hotline on the day he killed himself, maybe he wouldn’t have done it.” I realized, this is a message we had to get out to military families: There’s a place you can call, a place where you can be heard.

Kors: Were you worried that your film would look like a 40-minute commercial for the V.A.?

Goosenberg Kent: I was. But the failures of the V.A. have been amply reported. I was more concerned that there was this hotline out there, a bright light with top-notch people ready to help, and many military families didn’t even know it existed.

Kors: It is amazing how many veterans I talk to who are in crisis but don’t know about the hotline or have never thought to call.

Goosenberg Kent: Exactly. The longer we filmed at the call center, the more urgency I felt to tell soldiers what a resource they had there. I remember one call, an Army sniper who said, “I saw a child get blown away.” He wasn’t able to tell that story to his buddies or his wife. But to the responder, he could. It was an amazing moment. It was the beginning of something.

Kors: In the film, none of the calls end in suicide. Did you film any calls that ended unsuccessfully?

Goosenberg Kent: No, we didn’t capture anything like that. I know that occasionally it does happens. But not as often as you might think. When it does, usually the responder will find out much later: “You took a call a few weeks ago from a Marine in crisis. He didn’t make it.” But that didn’t happen while we were there.

Kors: Recently the Crisis Line has drawn fire from vets who say they called, needing immediate assistance, and instead were put on hold. I know Senator Bill Nelson has been looking into this. Was this a problem that you saw during your time at the call center?

Goosenberg Kent: No, I didn’t see anything like that. Believe me, if I saw responders putting veterans on hold, I would not have ignored that. But that’s not how the call center is set up. Responders don’t have a queue, with blinking lights for callers they have to get to. The center has 255 responders. And when each of them is talking with a veteran, the calls are rolled over to backup centers, which are also staffed with trained responders. I met several of them.

Kors: Did you ever meet a veteran who called the Crisis Line?

Goosenberg Kent: I did. The New America Foundation was screening our film, and a veteran at the screening told me she called the Crisis Line. She had been sexually assaulted while serving and was struggling with that. She said the Crisis Line saved her. To hear that from a veteran, in person, it was wonderful. She said that after the call, she got herself to a better place and got involved with [the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America].

Kors: It is tough, though, for veterans to get to a place where they’re ready to call and ask for help.

Goosenberg Kent: I think it is. That’s part of the culture that I was hoping to chip away at, this idea that only the weak pick up the phone and ask for help. I remembering reading a series of articles about soldiers being bullied for seeking help, including soldiers at Fort Carson who were actively discouraged from seeking help. That was heartbreaking to me, and when I made this film, those articles very much in my mind. I wanted veterans to see that asking for help is actually a sign of strength. It’s an act of courage, one that doesn’t make you any less of a hero. In fact, it’s the beginning of getting your life back together.

Kors: Nonetheless, I bet a lot of civilians will see the movie and say, “It’s sad to hear that so many vets are in crisis. And it’s good that these responders are helping some of them. But either way, there’s not really anything I can do about it.”

Goosenberg Kent: No. That’s not true at all. In fact, that’s exactly the opposite of what I hope people will take from the film.

Kors: What do you want them to take from the film?

Goosenberg Kent: That they can be part of the solution. Even people with no training in psychology or counseling. You can ask a veteran how he’s doing. Let him know that you’re available to listen.

The worse feeling in the world is a sense of isolation. That’s what I learned from my time at the Crisis Line. You don’t have to have gone to war to understand pain or trauma, or empathy or understanding. The responders provide an example of how to open the lines of communications, how to be part of a conversation that all of us can engage in.

Follow Joshua Kors on Facebook at www.facebook.com/joshua.kors.

Follow Joshua Kors on Twitter at www.twitter.com/joshuakors.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Visit Gabby Love today for the hottest fashion entertainment online!
Ashley Madison - Have an affair. Married Dating, Affairs, Married Women, Extramarital Affair

Margot Robbie Celebrates Her Birthday As Harley Quinn On The Set Of ‘Suicide Squad’

The most surprising thing about Margot Robbie’s birthday cake on the set of “Suicide Squad” is that it actually looks edible.

The cast of the movie has been known to give each other peculiar gifts, such as the rat that Jared Leto previously sent to Robbie that was then “adopted” by other celebs, but that wasn’t the case for the actress’s birthday celebration.

Robbie, who just had a birthday July 2, shared a photo of her in Harley Quinn makeup with a caption reading, “Harley’s cake – thank you squad!”

Harley’s cake – thank you squad!

A photo posted by @margotrobbie on



News recently broke that movie director David Ayer has an on-set therapist for the cast since the actors have to work with pretty dark material. So, at least in the case of Robbie, it looks like it’s working. The actress also shared a photo of balloons on her actual b-day, saying that she was “Spoilt rotten today”:

Spoilt rotten today

A photo posted by @margotrobbie on




Yep. There’s nothing too disturbing about balloons. Unless, of course, that means there’s a scary clown around, too. In that case, we might all need to use that therapist.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Heed the Warning Signs of Teen Suicide, Experts Say

Withdrawal, changes in daily habits can signal trouble
healthfinder.gov Daily News
SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN!-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News-
HEALTH SPECIALS!!-

Save up to 50% at Walgreens

Aisle View: Suicide Is Painless

2015-01-10-3318.jpg

Joey Slotnick (in coffin) and the Cast of Dying for It. Photo: Ahron Foster

“Suicide is painless” goes that innocuous-but-satirical ditty written for the 1970 movie “M*A*S*H.” Suicide was also painless in Nikolai Erdman’s 1928 play The Suicide, but the satire was so severe that the Soviet authorities cancelled the production and sent the author off to Siberia. This despite, apparently, a plea from the great Stanislavsky to Stalin himself on Erdman’s behalf. The Suicide was sent into a deep freeze so deep that it went unproduced in Russia until decades after the author’s death. The Atlantic Theatre Company now gives us Moira Buffini’s adaptation of The Suicide, at the Linda Gross Theater. Dying for It was initially produced by The Almeida Theatre in London in 2007.

Erdman’s piece was an absurdist comedy, falling somewhere between Gogol’s The Inspector General and Marx’s “Duck Soup.” (Not that Marx, but the subversive brothers from East 93rd Street–who in any event didn’t make their film until Erdman was already in exile.) Semyon Semyonovich is a henpecked failure who decides to end it all. His neighbors are scandalized; this was 1928, when suicide wasn’t quite so common as today.

Once accepting the notion, the locals realize that Semyonovich’s death can support their own individual causes. A member of the intelligentsia sees him as a hero for the former elite; a free-spirited floozy wants him to die proclaiming his love for her; the priest thinks the suicide will drive people back to the church–and they each provide Semyonovich with suicide notes to that effect. In the end, the hapless hero doesn’t commit suicide and in a farcical climax bursts out of his coffin.

This makes for an intriguing evening of ideas, and a dangerous one in 1928 since Semyonovich’s complaints were not-too-obliquely aimed at the Soviet government. (The language is fairly direct in this adaptation, although it’s impossible to know just how seditious Erdman was without reading the Russian original.) In any event, the play–which in its time was a dangerously-sharp satire–now has the danger removed, making it a farce of ideas. As such, it has its points but eventually runs out of comedic steam. The Atlantic’s Dying for It is a play that you want to like and support, but after a while you reach the point where it starts to wear down.

Let it be added that Buffini–an English playwright whose recent Elizabeth II/Thatcher satire Handbagged was an Olivier Award-winning comic delight–has given us a far more engaging adaptation than the one that landed on Broadway in 1980 at the ANTA. That production, called The Suicide, featured Derek Jacobi–at the height of his stardom–as the hero, and is remembered by this viewer as somnolently lethargic. After seeing Dying for It, one concludes that Jacobi was severely miscast.

Joey Slotnick, in the present production, does better as Semyonovich. Even so, the 2007 London production of Dying for It apparently got an enormous lift from the actor in the role, which does not happen here. Jeanine Serralles as the wife, Mary Beth Piel as the mother-in-law, Peter Maloney as the priest, Mia Barron as a café owner and CJ Wilson as the thuggish boarder all offer amusing portrayals; the entire cast, in fact, does an admirable job. There is also a superbly decrepit set from Walt Spangler. But while the production under the direction of Neil Pepe offers numerous sparks, it never quite catches fire.

.

Dying for It, Moira Buffini’s adaptation of The Suicide by Nikolai Erdman, opened January 8, 2015 and continues through January 18 at the Linda Gross Theater
Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Aisle View: Suicide is Painless

2015-01-10-3318.jpg

Joey Slotnick (in coffin) and the Cast of Dying for It. Photo: Ahron Foster

“Suicide is painless” goes that innocuous-but-satirical ditty written for the 1970 movie “M*A*S*H.” Suicide was also painless in Nikolai Erdman’s 1928 play The Suicide, but the satire was so severe that the Soviet authorities cancelled the production and sent the author off to Siberia. This despite, apparently, a plea from the great Stanislavsky to Stalin himself on Erdman’s behalf. The Suicide was sent into a deep freeze so deep that it went unproduced in Russia until decades after the author’s death. The Atlantic Theatre Company now gives us Moira Buffini’s adaptation of The Suicide, at the Linda Gross Theater. Dying for It was initially produced by The Almeida Theatre in London in 2007.

Erdman’s piece was an absurdist comedy, falling somewhere between Gogol’s The Inspector General and Marx’s “Duck Soup.” (Not that Marx, but the subversive brothers from East 93rd Street–who in any event didn’t make their film until Erdman was already in exile.) Semyon Semyonovich is a henpecked failure who decides to end it all. His neighbors are scandalized; this was 1928, when suicide wasn’t quite so common as today.

Once accepting the notion, the locals realize that Semyonovich’s death can support their own individual causes. A member of the intelligentsia sees him as a hero for the former elite; a free-spirited floozy wants him to die proclaiming his love for her; the priest thinks the suicide will drive people back to the church–and they each provide Semyonovich with suicide notes to that effect. In the end, the hapless hero doesn’t commit suicide and in a farcical climax bursts out of his coffin.

This makes for an intriguing evening of ideas, and a dangerous one in 1928 since Semyonovich’s complaints were not-too-obliquely aimed at the Soviet government. (The language is fairly direct in this adaptation, although it’s impossible to know just how seditious Erdman was without reading the Russian original.) In any event, the play–which in its time was a dangerously-sharp satire–now has the danger removed, making it a farce of ideas. As such, it has its points but eventually runs out of comedic steam. The Atlantic’s Dying for It is a play that you want to like and support, but after a while you reach the point where it starts to wear down.

Let it be added that Buffini–an English playwright whose recent Elizabeth II/Thatcher satire Handbagged was an Olivier Award-winning comic delight–has given us a far more engaging adaptation than the one that landed on Broadway in 1980 at the ANTA. That production, called The Suicide, featured Derek Jacobi–at the height of his stardom–as the hero, and is remembered by this viewer as somnolently lethargic. After seeing Dying for It, one concludes that Jacobi was severely miscast.

Joey Slotnick, in the present production, does better as Semyonovich. Even so, the 2007 London production of Dying for It apparently got an enormous lift from the actor in the role, which does not happen here. Jeanine Serralles as the wife, Mary Beth Piel as the mother-in-law, Peter Maloney as the priest, Mia Barron as a café owner and CJ Wilson as the thuggish boarder all offer amusing portrayals; the entire cast, in fact, does an admirable job. There is also a superbly decrepit set from Walt Spangler. But while the production under the direction of Neil Pepe offers numerous sparks, it never quite catches fire.

.

Dying for It, Moira Buffini’s adaptation of The Suicide by Nikolai Erdman, opened January 8, 2015 and continues through January 18 at the Linda Gross Theater
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Cocaine, Amphetamines May Up Injection Drug Users’ Suicide Risk

These substances doubled the likelihood of an attempt, study says
healthfinder.gov Daily News
SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN!-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News-
HEALTH SPECIALS!!-

Save up to 50% at Walgreens

Pat Robertson Blames ‘God Of The Heathen’ For Robin Williams’ Suicide

Pat Robertson thinks he knows what could’ve saved Robin Williams: More Jesus.

On his show “The 700 Club” on ABC Family Wednesday, Robertson warned viewers of the consequences of chasing “gods” such as fame and money:

“You see these very popular people in the media who commit suicide like Robin Williams recently and you say, ‘What is the deal with him? What happened?’ You find people who are at the top of the game in music and they’re strung out on drugs. What happened? What was their God?

You see, the god of the heathen are idols, and everything that you seek in life can ruin you unless that something and somebody is God himself.

He can fill your every need, and he won’t disappoint you and you won’t want to commit suicide after you have come to him.”

Williams killed himself at his home near San Francisco on Aug. 11 at the age of 63. He had been battling severe depression and had recently spent time in rehab.

His wife, Susan Schneider, later released a statement saying the actor’s “sobriety was intact” at the time of his death and that he had been struggling with the early stages of Parkinson’s disease.

(h/t Raw Story)
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

When Older Adults Consider Suicide, Depression May Not Be Main Reason

Study suggests health, money, family problems more likely to trigger troubling thoughts
healthfinder.gov Daily News
SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN!-http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News-
HEALTH SPECIALS!!-

Save up to 50% at Walgreens